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AMS Standing Committee on New Skills

Policy Instrument

AMS Standing Committee on New Skills

AMS Standing Committee on New Skills
Austria

Description

Timespan

Implemented in October 2009 as a response to the economic crisis.

Stage

Fully operational

Foundations

Policy area

The Committee has continually initiated projects/workshops/lectures that aim to identify changes in the needs for qualifications in collaboration with experts from companies. Based on these projects, the Committee develops continuing education and training (CET) programmes to make it easier for jobseekers to re-enter the world of work.

Policy goal

Identifying changes in the needs for qualifications/new skills. To design training measures for the unemployed and to guide (further) training in companies and in specific occupations, based on input working groups (PES and companies representatives). Working groups are created for specific sectors, made up of sectoral clusters of business representatives (e.g. in construction and building, business administration, chemicals and plastics, electrical engineering/electronics/ telecommunications, energy and environmental engineering, commerce, machinery/motor vehicles/metal, tourism, and health). These groups then formulate a list of current and future sector-specific requirements for employees and jobseekers in their sectors. The outcomes are used by AMS for the design of training measures for the unemployed and are also meant to guide (further) training in companies and in specific occupations.

Mismatch

Explicitly designed to address skill mismatch

PES, employers and other sector experts cooperate to identify skills needs.

Administrative level

National

Main responsible body

PES

Stakeholders

The Standing Committee is meant to prepare employed and jobseekers for future changes and challenges in the labour market via active labour market policies, especially in times of under-utilisation of economic capacities.
Stakeholders (in the educational system as well as in the labour market, e.g. PES, employers, employees) are responsible for putting the knowledge into practice. For example, active labour market programmes calls for tenders of the Austrian PES are often based on input provided by the Standing Committee.

Funding

No information is publicly available

Intended beneficiaries

Companies intend to profit from the know-how acquired by the committee. Also, insights of the committee are relevant for jobseeker as well as employees and apprentices in the sectors (clusters) relevant for the Standing Committee that want to acquire new skills to gain better employment opportunities.

Processes

Use of labour market intelligence

Working groups are created for specific sectors, made up of sectoral clusters of business representatives (e.g. in construction and building, business administration, chemicals and plastics, electrical engineering/electronics/ telecommunications, energy and environmental engineering, commerce, machinery/motor vehicles/metal, tourism, and health). These groups then formulate a list of current and future sector-specific requirements for employees and jobseekers in their sectors. The outcomes are used by AMS for the design of training measures for the unemployed and are also meant to guide (further) training in companies and in specific occupations.

Financial schemes

None

Frequency of updates

Several publications per year between 2010 and 2014.

Development

The number of clusters that the instrument focuses on were expanded. E.g. in autumn 2010, clusters like "electrical engineering/ electronics, telecommunication", "health and care", or "energy and environmental technologies" were implemented.

Barriers

The main barrier is the translation of insights into practice.

Success factors

The structural change in the labour market (e.g. digitisation) increase the probability that insights are effectively put into practice by stakeholders.

Monitoring

Attendance at the events could be seen as a indicator for progress or success of the instrument, however no information is publicly available if attendance is actually measured.

Innovativeness

Slightly innovative

Slightly innovative as know-how of experts with (practical) experience in certain promising fields is used as input to improve the educational system.

Sustainability

Evidence of effectiveness

There is no evaluation or assessment of the effectiveness. The measure focuses strongly on gathering company experts’ views. At an early stage, other experts/institutions were included. The measure might gain in effectiveness if researchers were included in the process to comment on the views of company experts.

Engagement of stakeholders

Workshops are carried out regularly. They enable continuous engagement of stakeholders.

Transferability

Easily transferable

In general, the instrument is easily transferable. Success is however highly dependent on the stakeholders cooperation.

Sustainability

As the tasks of the instrument are not tied to a specific time frame, as skills needs and trends are always changing, the Standing Committee will remain relevant. For example, digitisation of the labour market became a more and more important topic during the last few years. The Standing Committee published several reports regarding this topic from 2015 to 2017.