Brexit Disclaimer
This website as well as the publications and online tools accessible via this website may contain UK data and analysis based on research conducted before the United Kingdom’s exit from the European Union on 31 January 2020. EU averages or other statistical parameters including the UK reflect the situation in the European Union before 31 January 2020 and should not be considered as representative of the situation in the EU thereafter. Any data or information pertaining to the UK will be gradually phased out from Cedefop’s website, publications and online tools, as ongoing research projects with the United Kingdom’s participation are concluded. Data coming from UK were collected, processed and published before its withdrawal from the EU. Therefore, EU averages contain UK related data up to 2019.

General themes

The main features of the Hungarian VET system are:

  • participation in both upper-secondary VET tracks is decreasing;
  • apprenticeship has been steadily increasing (25% of all IVET learners in 2017 had an apprenticeship contract);
  • early leaving from education and training is a challenge, especially in VET; it coexists with low employment rates in the age span 15-24;
  • the share of adults enrolling in VET offered in the school system to upskill is on the rise ([1]Thanks primarily to the opportunity to obtain a second vocational qualification free of charge since 2015. The share of adults enrolled in ISCED 353 skilled workers’ training programmes increased from 10.7% in 2015 to 27.1% in 2017.).

Distinctive features ([2]Cedefop (2018). Spotlight on VET in Hungary - 2017. Luxembourg: Publications Office.
http://www.cedefop.europa.eu/en/publications-and-resources/publications/8126
):

The national vocational qualifications register (NVQR), in place since 1993, comprises State-recognised (partial, full or add-on) vocational qualifications that can be acquired either in formal upper and post-secondary IVET or outside the formal education system. NVQR qualifications entitle holders to practise the occupation specified in the vocational and examination requirements set for a given qualification. The register has a modular, competence-based structure and is regularly updated in accordance with labour market needs. The revision process is run by the ministry responsible for VET (currently, the Ministry for Innovation and Technology) in coordination with the ministries responsible for the qualifications and the recently created sectoral skills councils (coordinated by the Chamber of Commerce and Industry, with the involvement of the Chamber of Agriculture in relevant sectors). It closely follows the economy.

Young people and adults need to pass the complex examination upon completion of VET programmes ([3]Provided within or outside the school system.) in order to obtain an NVQR vocational qualification.

To improve quality and efficiency in a heavily fragmented institutional VET structure, 44 regional integrated VET centres were created in 2015 and have run under the responsibility of the ministry responsible for VET.

A shortage job list is issued each year on the basis of recommendations from the ‘county development and training committees’; it is based on employment and employability data and labour market needs forecasts. Practice providers are offered incentives to encourage training in shortage jobs and learners receive grants. In school-based VET, learners enrolled in programmes to acquire a first qualification in shortage jobs may receive a scholarship, based on their performance.

Despite a decrease since 2015, youth unemployment remains substantial and coexists with great skills shortages and mismatches. The demographic decline has negatively affected enrolment in VET, especially in skilled workers training. programmes. Nearly one third of VET learners in ISCED 3 level programmes leave education without qualifications, mainly due to disadvantaged socioeconomic background and low basic skills.

Changes in VET-related legislation in 2015 aimed to enhance the image, quality and attractiveness of vocational education and training in line with European policies and national priorities set for 2016-20.

Bridging programmes replaced the previous catching-up variants in 2013 and were reformed in 2015. They are available in both general and vocational streams, and allow underperformers (often learners from deprived backgrounds) to acquire the basic skills necessary to enrol in upper secondary education and training. In the vocational stream learners can achieve a partial NVQR ([4]National vocational qualifications register; see also Section 1. Summary of main elements and distinctive features of VET.) qualification before moving to upper secondary VET.

VET programmes updated in 2015 and offered as of 2016/17 aim to ease access to occupations in demand, balancing labour shortages and skills gaps. Upper secondary VET programmes offer a first vocational qualification while easing progression routes.

The quality and relevance of practical training is a priority. Dual training (apprenticeship training contract) is being promoted. The percentage of practical training in companies has increased considerably; minimum pedagogical knowledge has been made compulsory for in-company trainers. The chamber guarantee (2015) measure and the reform of upper secondary VET in recent years resulted in an increase in apprenticeships enrolments by 8%.

 

Increase of the number of apprentices (except for the sector of agriculture) between 1997/98 and 2017/18

Source: Hungarian Chamber of Commerce and Industry, 2018.

 

Adult learning for all is being promoted. Acquiring a second NVQR qualification is free of charge ([5]In adult education provided in VET schools.) since 2015 (without any age limit); the measure opens up more than half of full or partial NVQR qualifications to older workers. The Chamber of Commerce has been developing standards for the majority of qualifications in skilled workers training since 2010. This responsibility is currently being reviewed in relation to the responsibilities of the newly created sectoral skills councils, coordinated by the chamber. Programmes supporting further education are designed to help the inclusion of the Roma in those areas where they are mostly affected.

Adapted from Spotlight on VET Hungary 2017 ([6]Cedefop (2018). Spotlight on VET in Hungary - 2017. Luxembourg: Publications Office.
http://www.cedefop.europa.eu/en/publications-and-resources/publications/8126
):

Population in 2018: 9 778 371 ([7]NB: Data for population as of 1 January. Eurostat table tps00001 [extracted 16.5.2019].)

Population in the last decades is decreasing due to low birth rates and relatively high mortality rates. It decreased by -1.3% since 2013 ([8]NB: Data for population as of 1 January. Eurostat table tps00001 [extracted 16.5.2019].).

The population in Hungary is decreasing and ageing.

The old-age dependency ratio is expected to increase from 27 in 2015 to 53 in 2060 ([9]Old-age-dependency ratio is defined as the ratio between the number of persons aged 65 and more over the number of working-age persons (15-64). The value is expressed per 100 persons of working age (15-64).).

 

Population forecast by age group and old-age-dependency ratio

Source: Eurostat, proj_15ndbims [extracted 16.5.2019].

 

According to national statistics ([10]KSH (2017). Mikrocenzus 2016 - 3. Demográfiai adatok [Micro census 2016. Part 3: Demographic data]. Budapest: KSH.
http://www.ksh.hu/docs/hun/xftp/idoszaki/mikrocenzus2016/mikrocenzus_2016_3.pdf
KSH stands for Központi Statisztikai Hivatal (Central Statistical Office).
), the number of young people under 15 as well as in the age span 15-64 are falling, while the number of people aged 65+ is on the rise.

An increasing share of people over the age of 50 in the working-age population concurs with a declining number of school-age learners (see figure below). That indicates a further decrease of learners in initial vocational education and training (IVET) and an increasing demand for continuing vocational education and training (CVET) and other forms of adult learning.

 

Learners in initial education and training (aged 3-22) ([11]Education is compulsory from age 3 to 16. Learners in higher education can obtain a master degree at age 22 at the earliest.), 2008-18

Source: Hungarian Central Statistics Office, Társadalmi Haladás Mutatószám rendszere (System of Indicators of Social Development) http://www.ksh.hu/thm/2/indi2_2_1.html

 

At the 2011 census, 98.4% of the people declared that they spoke Hungarian as their native language and 4.3% identified themselves as a member of one of the recognised minority groups (Roma, Germans, Croats, Slovaks, etc.).

The largest minority group are Roma ([12]2% in the 2011 census; but their share in more recent research and surveys is much higher, around 9% and rising.). Their share among school-aged children is significantly higher ([13]According to the 2011 census data, 43% of them are aged under 20. See
http://www.ksh.hu/docs/hun/xftp/stattukor/nemzetiseg_demografia.pdf
) than their share in the population and is on the rise. The vast majority of Roma learners continue their studies after completing primary school (integrated primary and lower secondary education) in VET at upper secondary level ([14]Around 90% of Roma students continue studying at upper secondary level but around 90% of them study in VET. See
https://www.mtakti.hu/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/14_Kertesi_Kezdi_TRIP2010.pdf
), but almost half of them leave upper secondary education without any qualification. Less than a third of them obtain an NVQR ([15]The National vocational qualifications register (NVQR) includes all State-recognised vocational qualifications regulated by the 2011 VET act.) qualification and only about a quarter acquire the secondary school leaving certificate ([16]8% in upper secondary general education programmes, 16% in VET programmes. Without this certificate, they may not continue studies at post-secondary/tertiary level. Source: Hajdú, T, Kertesi, G., Kézdi, G. (2014). Roma fiatalok a középiskolában. Beszámoló a TÁRKI Életpálya-felmérésének 2006 és 2012 közötti hullámaiból [Roma youth in secondary school: report about the waves of the TÁRKI career survey between 2006 and 2012). In: Társadalmi riport, 2014. Budapest: TÁRKI, pp. 265-302.
http://old.tarki.hu/adatbank-h/kutjel/pdf/b334.pdf
).

The high drop-out rate among Roma learners can be explained mostly by their socially disadvantaged background and their competence deficiencies accumulated during their prior schooling. Roma learners and adults are therefore prioritised for receiving public scholarships and support in labour market programmes.

The economy is small and open. Small sized enterprises are 99.7% of all enterprises. The share of micro enterprises among them was 97.8% on 31 December 2017 ([17]KSH (2018). A regisztrált gazdasági szervezetek száma, 2017 [Number of registered business organisations, 2017]. Budapest: KSH.
https://www.ksh.hu/docs/hun/xftp/gyor/gaz/gaz1712.pdf
).

Only 0.3% of all enterprises are medium sized and 0.1% is large.

SMEs employed two thirds of the workforce ([18]Hungarian SMEs employ 3.3 persons on average, below the EU average of 3.9 (SBA Fact Sheet, 2017,
https://ec.europa.eu/docsroom/documents/29489 ).
) and produced 43% of gross value added (GVA) in 2016 ([19]KSH (2018). Magyarország, 2017 [Hungary, 2017]. Budapest: KSH, pp. 150-151.
http://www.ksh.hu/docs/hun/xftp/idoszaki/mo/mo2017.pdf
).

Economy is characterised by a shift to services that produced 64.8% of total gross value added (GVA) and employed 63% of the workforce in 2017.

Industry still had a share of 26.4% of GVA and employed nearly a quarter of the workforce (23%).

The construction industry and agriculture produced 4.8% and 3.9% of total gross value added and had shares of 6.8% and 5% of total employment, respectively ([20]KSH (2018). Magyarország, 2017 [Hungary, 2017]. Budapest: KSH, pp. 36, 130-131.
http://www.ksh.hu/docs/hun/xftp/idoszaki/mo/mo2017.pdf and KSH (2016). A kis- és középvállalkozások helyzete hazánkban, 2016 [The situation of SMEs in Hungary in, 2016]. Budapest: KSH.
http://www.ksh.hu/docs/hun/xftp/idoszaki/pdf/kkv16.pdf
)).

Main export industries are:

  • automotive;
  • electronics;
  • pharmaceuticals and medical technology;
  • ICT (telecommunications, IT outsourcing, IT services, software and hardware production);
  • food processing industry;
  • chemical industry;
  • textiles and clothing industry.

The labour market is highly regulated. A list with all regulated professions in Hungary is available at the European database of regulated professions ([21]543 (2019 data); see also
http://ec.europa.eu/growth/tools-databases/regprof/index.cfm?action=regprofs&id_country=21&quid=1&mode=asc#bottom
).

In 2018, the total unemployment ([22]Percentage of active population aged 25-74.) in Hungary was 3.2% (6% in the EU-28); it decreased by 3.7 percentage points since 2008 ([23]Eurostat table une_rt_a [extracted 20.5.2019].).

 

Unemployment rate (aged 15-24 and 25-64) by education attainment level in 2008-18

NB: Data based on ISCED 2011; breaks in time series; low reliability for ISCED 5-8, age 15-24.
ISCED 0-2 = less than primary, primary and lower secondary education.
ISCED 3-4 = upper secondary and post-secondary non-tertiary education. ISCED 5-8 = tertiary education.
Source: Eurostat, lfsa_urgaed [extracted 16.5.2019].

 

Unemployment has decreased in the last decade. The unemployment rate of unskilled workers, although decreasing steadily since 2014, is considerably higher compared to the share of people with medium- and high-level qualifications.

Employment rate of 20 to 34-year-old VET graduates has increased from 78% in 2014 to 84.5% in 2017 ([24]Eurostat table edat_lfse_24 [extracted 16.5.2019].).

 

Employment rate of VET graduates (20 to 34 years old, ISCED levels 3 and 4)

NB: Data based on ISCED 2011; breaks in time series.
ISCED 3-4 = upper secondary and post-secondary non-tertiary education.
Source: Eurostat, edat_lfse_24 [extracted 16.5.2019].

 

The employment rate of 20 to 34-year old VET graduates increased by 6.1 percentage points in 2014-18 and is higher compared to the increase in employment of all 20 to 34-year old graduates (+4.8%) in the same period in Hungary ([25]NB: Break in series. Eurostat table edat_lfse_24 [extracted 16 5.2019].).

In Hungary, most people in the age group 25-64 have a medium level qualification (59.8%, against 45.7% in the EU-28), placing Hungary fifth among all EU28+ countries with the highest share in this group in 2018. People with high level qualifications represent 25.1% of the total population aged 25 to 64, which is lower than the EU average (32.2%). The share of people with no or low level qualifications (15.1%) is below the EU-28 average (21.8%) in 2018.

 

Population (aged 25 to 64) by highest education level attained in 2018

NB: Data based on ISCED 2011; low reliability for ‘no response’ in Czechia, Iceland, Latvia and Poland.
ISCED 0-2 = less than primary, primary and lower secondary education.
ISCED 3-4 = upper secondary and post-secondary non-tertiary education.
ISCED 5-8 = tertiary education.
Source: Eurostat, lfsa_pgaed [extracted 16.5.2019].

 

Share of learners in VET by level in 2017

lower secondary

upper secondary

post-secondary

0.2%

23%

100%

Source: Eurostat, educ_uoe_enrs01, educ_uoe_enrs04 and educ_uoe_enrs07 [extracted 16.5.2019].

The share of learners in lower secondary VET decreased by -0.2 percentage points from 2013 to 2017. In the same period, the share of learners in upper secondary VET decreased by -3.5 percentage points.

 

Share of initial VET learners from total learners at upper-secondary level (ISCED level 3), 2017

NB: Data based on ISCED 2011.
Source: Eurostat, educ_uoe_enrs04 [extracted 16.5.2019].

 

Traditionally, there are more males in VET (63.2%, or 66.1% in full time education in 2016/17), though the share of females is nearly 50% in programmes that span upper- and post-secondary education (49.8%, or 47.5% in full time education).

Males prefer IT, engineering, transport, electronics, manufacturing and construction, while females most often enrol in health and social care, economics and office management and services (tourism, catering, the beauty industry).

The share of early leavers from education and training has increased by 1 percentage point, from 11.5% in 2009 to 12.5% in 2018. It is above the national target for 2020 of not more than 10% and the EU-28 average of 10.6%.

 

Early leavers from education and training in 2009-18

NB: Share of the population aged 18 to 24 with at most lower secondary education and not in further education or training; break in series.
Source: Eurostat, edat_lfse_14 [extracted 16.5.2019] and European Commission, https://ec.europa.eu/info/2018-european-semester-national-reform-programmes-and-stability-convergence-programmes_en [accessed 14.11.2018].

 

Reducing the high number of drop-outs from VET is a national challenge. Early leaving from education and training can be explained mainly by learners’ disadvantaged socio-economic background and low basic skills (due to quality problems with primary school education provision) and the inability of VET schools to compensate these disadvantages ([26]As shown also by the PISA results, the impact of learners’ socioeconomic background on education outcomes in Hungary is the strongest in the EU and the impact of school/programme type on outcomes is also very significant, reflecting early selection in secondary education. See also European Commission (2017). Education and Training Monitor 2017: country analysis. Luxembourg: Publications Office.
https://publications.europa.eu/en/publication-detail/-/publication/6e709b4c-bac0-11e7-a7f8-01aa75ed71a1/language-en/format-PDF/source-search
). A mid-term national strategy to prevent early leaving from education and training is in place (2014-20).

In 2014, learners in ISCED 353 level VET programmes ([27]Three-year upper secondary VET programmes offering skilled workers training (ISCED 353/EQF level 4) not leading to the end of upper secondary school-leaving certificate.) accounted for nearly half of all drop-outs whereas they represented only 21% of the whole school population. Nearly one-third of learners leave these programmes without a qualification ([28]To obtain a vocational qualification upon completion of upper and post-secondary VET programmes, learners have to take the practice-oriented complex examination which is based on the standards established for this qualification. Qualification standards are defined in the vocational and examination requirements regulated by degree for a given qualification.). The share of drop-outs from the other VET track (vocational grammar school ISCED 344 programmes combining general and vocational subjects at upper secondary level) is lower but remains high ([29]It was 19% in grades 9-12 in 2013. The dropout rate in post-secondary ISCED 454 VET programmes was 16% in 2013. Source: Mártonfi, G. (2013). Early leaving from VET - Hungary. Cedefop ReferNet Thematic perspectives [unedited].
http://www.cedefop.europa.eu/en/events-and-projects/networks/refernet/thematic-perspectives/early-leaving-from-vet
).

More information on early leaving from E&T in Hungary ([30]Cedefop (2017). Leaving education early: putting vocational education and training centre stage - Hungary. Cedefop country fiche [unedited].
http://www.cedefop.europa.eu/en/publications-and-resources/country-reports/leaving-education-early-putting-vocational-education-an-5
).

Adult participation in lifelong learning (aged 25-64) is being promoted in Hungary, with a special focus on early leavers and people without a VET qualification.

 

Participation in lifelong learning in 2014-18

NB: Share of adult population aged 25 to 64 participating in education and training; break in series.
Source: Eurostat, trng_lfse_01 [extracted 16.5.2019].

 

Participation in lifelong learning increased by 2.7 percentage points since 2014 (from 3.3% to 6.0% in 2018) and is lower than the EU-28 average (11.1% in 2018). However, this increase is due primarily to a break in the series of statistical data: in 2015, additional clarifications and reminders were added to the Hungarian survey for better coverage of compulsory training systems and introduction courses for those who started their job recently ([31]Eurostat file ‘country specific breaks’. Available at
https://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/statistics-explained/index.php/EU_labour_force_survey_%E2%80%93_data_and_publication#Comparability_over_time_and_across_countries [accessed 2.4.2019].
).

 

VET learners by age group (*)(2010-16)

NB: (*) In school-based VET programmes and in adult training; data about adult training excludes learners in the following programme categories: catching-up training of disadvantaged people, foreign language training, general adult training and preparatory training aimed at obtaining entry competences.
Source: Statistical yearbooks of public education (2011-18). Online OSAP 1665 statistics https://statisztika.mer.gov.hu [accessed 18.6.2019].

 

Initial education and training system comprises:

  • pre-primary (ISCED level 0);
  • integrated primary and lower secondary (ISCED levels 1 and 2);
  • integrated lower and upper secondary general education (ISCED levels 2-3);
  • general (ISCED level 2) and vocational bridging programmes (ISCED levels 2-3);
  • upper secondary general, vocational or combined education (ISCED level 3);
  • post-secondary non-tertiary VET (ISCED level 4);
  • higher education VET (ISCED level 5);
  • higher education (ISCED levels 6,7 and 8).

The term ‘public education’ (köznevelés) ([32]Regulated by the Act CXC of 2011 on public education.) refers to the right to education to all from pre-primary to post-secondary non-tertiary level, and includes general and vocational education programmes in kindergartens and schools ([33]Beside the State, church and business entities, foundations, associations, etc., can also found and maintain public education institutions; private providers can also provide public education services.).

Compulsory schooling covers age three to 16. Education is free of charge up to the obtainment of the upper secondary school leaving certificate and/or two NVQR ([34]The National vocational qualifications register (NVQR) includes all State-recognised vocational qualifications regulated by the 2011 VET act.) vocational qualifications ([35]Since 2015, the right to acquire a second VET qualification free of charge is without age limit, therefore older adults may enrol in adult education (within the formal school system, in VET schools) to upskill, at no expenses.).

Pre-primary education is provided in kindergarten (óvoda) from age three to six ([36]Attendance is compulsory from September that follows the completion of three years old to mandatory school entry age (though exemption from attendance can be applied for and permitted up until the completion of age 5).). It is followed by an integrated primary and lower secondary eight-year programme (általános iskola; age 7-14) ([37]Two integrated lower and upper secondary general education paths are also available: an eight-year programme (ages 10 to 18) and a six-year programme (ages 12 to 18). The entry requirements in these highly selective schools include a national entry exam in Hungarian and Mathematics, oral exams organised by the schools as well as very good grades in primary school. In school year 2016/17, 7% of learners in lower secondary education studied in these schools (the rest in grades 5-8 of primary school). Source: Ministry of Human Resources (2017). Köznevelési Statisztikai Évkönyv 2016/2017 [Statistical yearbook of public education 2016/17]. Budapest: EMMI.
https://www.kormany.hu/download/5/0a/81000/Köznevelés-statisztikai%20évkönyv-2016-új.pdf
). To move on to upper secondary education, learners must complete the programme and thus obtain the primary school certificate.

For learners at risk of dropping out from education, two bridging programmes are in place ([38]Since 2013, though reformed in 2015.):

  • a one-year public education bridging programme (köznevelési hídprogram) for learners who finished lower secondary education but did not get admitted to upper secondary education, to prepare them for the entrance exam; and
  • a two-year VET bridging programme (szakképzési hídprogram) for learners who completed at most two (out of four) years of lower secondary education by age 15.

Upper secondary general education is provided in the so-called gimnázium (age 14-18). To move on to higher level studies, learners must obtain the (upper) secondary school leaving certificate (érettségi bizonyítvány) at the secondary school leaving exam at the end of grade 12.

Higher education ([39]Regulated by the Act CCIV of 2011 on higher education.) includes academic programmes at EQF levels 6-8. Vocational programmes are offered in higher education at EQF level 5, but are not considered VET ([40]These programmes are regulated by the higher education act and not the VET act (Act CLXXXVII of 2011 on vocational education and training).).

Adult education programmes (felnőttoktatás) offer general and vocational education at all education levels in flexible learning forms ([41]In full- or part- time (evening, correspondence, distance learning and other) courses. See also Section 6. VET within the education and training system/ VET learning options.).

Government-regulated VET is offered:

  • within the formal school system (participants have the status of student):
    • in VET schools, regulated by the 2011 public education act ([42]Act CXC of 2011 on public education.) and 2011 VET ([43]Act CLXXXVII of 2011 on vocational education and training.) act. Programmes are offered at EQF levels 2 to 5, either:

i) in regular full-time education for school-age learners and young people up to age 25; or

ii) in flexible learning forms for those over the compulsory schooling age (16) and older adults in adult education ([44]Young people over the compulsory schooling age (16) and up to 25 may enrol in both learning forms, either in regular full-time schooling or in flexible learning courses offered in adult education. NB: School-based full-time adult education (representing 90% of regular full time schooling hours) or part-time adult education courses (evening, correspondence, distance learning and other).);

  • in higher education, regulated by the 2011 Higher education act ([45]Act CCIV of 2011 on higher education.). Following the introduction of the 2011 VET act ([46]Act CLXXXVII of 2011 on vocational education and training.), EQF level 5 higher education vocational programmes offered in HE are no longer considered part of VET;
  • outside the formal school system (adult training) regulated by the 2013 adult training act ([47]Act LXXVII of 2013 on adult training (amended in 2015, 2016 and 2017).) and the 2011 VET act. Participants have a contractual relationship with the training provider.

National legislation thus distinguishes between VET provided within the school system (iskolai rendszerű szakképzés) and VET provided outside the school system (iskolarendszeren kívüli szakképzés), in adult training. VET qualifications included in the national vocational qualifications register ([48]The National vocational qualifications register (NVQR) includes all State-recognised vocational qualifications regulated by the 2011 VET act.) can be obtained in both sectors (and only these are provided within the school system, along with a formal education qualification upon completion of the programme that allows learners access to the next qualification level). Initial and continuing VET is also available in both, though full time VET provided within the school system is typically considered IVET.

Education provided within the formal school system is free of charge up to the obtainment of the upper secondary school leaving certificate (grade 12) and/or two NVQR ([49]The National vocational qualifications register (NVQR) includes all State-recognised vocational qualifications regulated by the 2011 VET act.) vocational qualifications ([50]For both school-age learners and adults enrolled in adult education programmes.). Adult training courses are fee-paying but the training of vulnerable target groups (unemployed, Roma etc.) can be publicly funded.

Work-based practical training is a part of the curricula of all VET programmes leading to NVQR qualifications and can be provided either in a school workshop or at a company. Apprenticeship training is only available in VET provided within the school system.

The type of attendance (full-time, part-time, evening classes, distance learning) of VET programmes depends on the type of education a learner is enrolled in.

Regular full-time education is mandatory for learners in compulsory schooling (up to age 16), in both the general and vocational paths.

Adult education (felnőttoktatás) (learners over 16) provides general or vocational programmes within the school system at all levels ([51]In both public education (which covers pre-primary to post-secondary) and higher education sectors.) in the following learning options:

  • full time (corresponding to 90% of regular full-time education programme hours);
  • part time (evening classes, 50%);
  • correspondence courses (10%); or
  • in ‘other’ (e.g. distant learning) forms.

Adult education targets learners who did not obtain a formal school certificate of a certain level or a VET qualification during their compulsory schooling, or who want to attain a new qualification. Adult education courses do not differ from regular full-time courses in terms of objectives, admission criteria, structure, main characteristics of curricula, or the awarded State-recognised qualifications.

Learners in the age span 16-25 may either enrol in regular full-time school-based education or enrol in adult education.

 

Share of learners in VET (provided within the school system) by learning form (%), 2017

Source: Educational Authority (Oktatási Hivatal): http://www.oh.gov.hu/, 2018.

 

Most people in adult education attend evening classes, only a few participate in distant learning or in any other special forms. The lower-qualified, older population are offered specifically designed programmes within adult training supported by the State.

Adult training (felnőttképzés) includes general, language or vocational programmes, provided outside the school system and covers many different types and forms of learning opportunities.

The scope of the adult training act of 2013 ([52]And in contrast to previous legislation.) covers:

  • training leading to NVQR qualifications;
  • training financed from public sources (the State budget or the training levy) ([53]Including training targeted at specific groups (the unemployed, other vulnerable groups).).

Outside the scope of the adult training act, other training programmes regulated by the State include:

  • training towards licenses, diplomas, certificates etc. not listed in the national vocational qualifications register (NVQR), required to perform certain jobs or to fulfil certain positions ([54]Typically in the fields of road, water and air transport, plant and veterinary health inspection or food hygiene.); their content and objectives are defined by legislation;
  • mandatory further training programmes for a given occupation ([55]ECVET of policemen, civil servants, teachers, judges, etc.) regulated by the responsible ministers.

The VET landscape shaped by the 2011 and 2015 (ongoing) VET reforms.

The content, funding and governance of VET were reformed in 2011 ([56]The 2+2 model of VET programmes offering skilled workers’ training was reduced to three-year dual VET ISCED 353 programmes; at the same time, an enhanced VET component was added to the first phase of the other long VET track spanning upper-secondary (four or five years, ISCED 344) and post-secondary (one or two year, ISCED 454) levels. VET qualifications offered in higher education were no longer included in the national vocational qualifications register (NVQR).) with the Chamber of Commerce and Industry ([57]Magyar Kereskedelmi és Iparkamara (MKIK).) gaining an even more important role in VET delivery. The 2015 reform focused on tackling early leaving, supporting VET and apprenticeships take up to provide skilled workforce ([58]The Chamber of Commerce and Industry has been in charge of promoting and supervising apprenticeship training provision, the introduction of ‘chamber guarantee’ made apprenticeship the default form of practical training in VET provided within the school system. Another measure introduced was an opportunity to obtain a second NVQR qualification free of charge in VET in adult education (national vocational qualifications register, NVQR).). Moreover, since 2016/17, the content and names of the different VET programmes were modified to raise the prestige and attractiveness of VET ([59]The secondary vocational school programmes, three-year VET ISCED 353 (dual) programmes offering skilled workers’ training; the vocational grammar school programmes, delivered partly in upper secondary four (five, with preparatory language training) year ISCED 344 combined general education and VET and post-secondary one or two-year ISCED 454 VET programmes; and vocational school programmes for SEN learners.). New legislation in December 2017 introduced apprenticeships earlier (in grades 11 and 12) in the upper-secondary years of the (longer) VET track ([60]The vocational grammar school track offers upper-secondary ISCED 344 combined general education and VET and post-secondary ISCED 454 VET programmes; see also the section on apprenticeships.).

Dual VET and apprenticeships were enhanced especially in upper secondary VET since 2012 and have been coordinated by the Chamber of Commerce and Industry. The chamber’s role in shaping VET was expanded by the introduction in 2015 of a chamber guarantee ([61]A written confirmation by the Chamber that there is no practical placement available.) for securing training places for VET learners. Policy priorities in vocational education and training focus on improving the quality of dual training and increasing the number of companies offering practical training (apprenticeship training contracts) ([62]Source: Cedefop (2018). Spotlight on VET in Hungary - 2017. Luxembourg: Publications Office.
https://www.cedefop.europa.eu/en/publications-and-resources/publications/8126 and
Cedefop (2018). Developments in vocational education and training policy in 2015-17 - Hungary. Cedefop monitoring and analysis of VET policies.https://www.cedefop.europa.eu/en/publications-and-resources/country-reports/vet-policy-developments-hungary-2017
).

Provision of practical training

The share of theory and practice in vocational training is defined in the vocational and examination requirements of the pursued vocational qualification included in the national vocational qualifications register (NVQR). There are two possible legal forms of training at a workplace (in VET provided within the school system), the first one is privileged by the VET act:

  • apprenticeship contract (tanulószerződés): the contract is made between the student and the company ([63]The AC comes into effect at the moment of the beginning of the training at the given training site stipulated in apprenticeship contract. In general (if there is no extraordinary case for earlier termination, such as expulsion from the vocational training school or termination of student status, termination by mutual consent, etc.) the apprenticeship contract is terminated on the last day of the complex examination (NB: Young people and adults need to pass the complex examination upon completion of VET programmes – provided within or outside the school system – in order to obtain an NVQR vocational qualification). It means duration depends on several factors, but the AC can be effective:
    - during the whole training period in vocational programmes at ISCED 353 level (in secondary vocational schools; three years); and
    - during the post-secondary training (grade 13 or grades 13 and 14) in vocational grammar school programmes (or, since 2017, from grade 11 if the learner chooses this option).
    ); apprentices receive monthly payment and are entitled to social insurance;
  • cooperation agreement (együttműködési megállapodás): the contract is made between the school and the company and learners receive payment only for the three-to-five-week practice during the summer holiday.

Apprenticeships are supervised by the Hungarian Chamber of Commerce and Industry (MKIK), which is responsible for accrediting and registering training providers, supporting learners to find one and registering apprenticeship contracts ([64]The Chamber of Commerce organises the ’level exam’ (szintvizsga) as well, at the end of the first VET year (in secondary vocational school and vocational school programmes), to assess whether learners have acquired the competences required for participating in company-based learning.).

Since 2015, learners are only allowed to participate in practical training at the school workshop or at a company, based on a cooperation agreement if there is no company (apprenticeship) placement available to them, which has to be confirmed in writing by the Chamber (the Chamber’s guarantee).

An apprenticeship contract can be signed from the beginning of the first VET year ([65]In vocational grammar schools programmes this possibility refers to the post-secondary path of the programme (grades 13 and 14). After the 2017 amendment (effective as of 2017/18), apprenticeship contracts may be concluded also in the last two upper secondary grades (grades 11 and 12).). However, in the first year (grade 9) of secondary vocational school (ISCED 353) programmes and vocational school programmes for SEN learners practical training can only be organised within the school or at a company workshop dedicated exclusively to practical training (except for the summer practice).

Practical training (as from grade 9) ([66]Practical training at a company in grade 9 is only possible in the case the company has a workshop dedicated exclusively to practical training provision.) can be organised on the basis of a school-company agreement only in special circumstances:

  • if the share of practical training is less than 40%;
  • if practical training is provided within the school and the company only provides the summer practice or supplementary practice;
  • if the practical training is provided at a State-maintained organisation; or
  • if an apprenticeship contract cannot be made due to lack of apprenticeship offer (confirmed by the Chambers guarantee) ([67]A written confirmation by the Chamber that there is no practical placement available.).

Provision of practical training by VET programme type

In 2016/17, while most vocational grammar school learners (upper and post-secondary, respectively ISCED 344/EQF4 and ISCED 454/EQF 5 programmes) still had their practical training in a school workshop or at a workplace based on a cooperation agreement, the majority of secondary vocational school learners (ISCED 353/EQF level 4 programmes) participated in dual (apprenticeship) training. The share of learners in one of the two forms of company-based learning by programme type is shown in the figure below.

 

Share of learners by type of company-based learning and programme type (%), 2016/17

NB: (*) data on cooperation agreements in ‘vocational schools for SEN learners’ are included under ‘secondary vocational schools’ – except for agreements signed in programmes that award a partial qualification that are included under ‘vocational school for SEN learners’.
(**) including 103 cooperation agreements signed in vocational bridging programmes.
Source: Hungarian Chamber of Commerce and Industry (MKIK); KSH STADAT database: http://www.ksh.hu/stadat_eves_2_6

 

Extending dual training (apprenticeships) in VET:

  • a policy target was set to increase by 2018 the share of apprenticeships in skilled worker’s training (ISCED 353 VET programmes) to 70% ([68]In 2017, almost one in four VET learners had an apprenticeship contract, most of whom (69%) were enrolled in three-year upper-secondary VET programmes. Source: Cedefop (2018). Spotlight on VET in Hungary - 2017. Luxembourg: Publications Office.
    http://www.cedefop.europa.eu/en/publications-and-resources/publications/8126
    ) and in the other VET track (spanning upper and post-secondary levels) to 25%;
  • the Chamber of Commerce and Industry and the Chamber of Agriculture support learners find an apprenticeship. Since the introduction of the Chamber guarantee in 2015, apprenticeship became the default form of practical training in VET schools. Practical training may be provided at the school workshop (or at a company based on a school-company agreement) only after the written confirmation by the chamber that no apprenticeships are available;
  • apprenticeship training has been introduced in adult education programmes since 2015 ([69]Adult education targets adults who did not obtain a formal school certificate of a certain level or a vocational qualification during their compulsory schooling, or who want to obtain a new qualification. Adult education is provided within the school system, typically in the same schools that provide full time education (IVET).).

New legislation in December 2017 ([70]Government of Hungary (2017). T/18309. számú törvényjavaslat [Bill No T/18309].
http://www.parlament.hu/irom40/18309/18309.pdf
) introduced a number of measures to further extend apprenticeship training in upper-secondary VET:

  • introducing the possibility to conclude apprenticeship contracts in grades 11 and 12, when the programme involves at least 250 hours per grade (500 hours of practical training in total in two years);
  • in the last year (grade 8) of lower secondary, learners may conclude a ‘pre-apprenticeship contract’ ([71]It is a special contract, effective from 1.1.2018.) which is a company commitment to offer, at a later stage, an apprenticeship contract to the learner who would enrol in upper-secondary VET;
  • extending the range of organisations eligible to provide apprenticeship training to State organisations and NGOs ([72]This refers to the social and pedagogy sectors and qualifications supervised by the minister of defence, to include State-maintained institutions, foundations, associations and churches.);
  • the regulation that aimed to prevent enterprises set up only to train IVET learners to receive public funding from the training levy was modified because it was unfavourable for micro companies; at the same time, the number of learners that a micro or small enterprise can train was limited to 12 ([73]Except for learners with multiple disadvantages and SEN learners and in case the chamber confirms in writing that there are no other apprenticeship placements available.) to ensure more effective training;
  • an opportunity was introduced for companies to establish joint sectoral training centres.

Learn more about apprenticeships in the national context from the European database on apprenticeship schemes by Cedefop: http://www.cedefop.europa.eu/en/publications-and-resources/data-visualisations/apprenticeship-schemes/scheme-fiches

Governance of the Hungarian VET system

Central governance and administration of VET and adult training, since 2018, is under the competence of the Ministry for Innovation and Technology (innovációs és technológiai miniszter) with other ministries being responsible for qualifications in their sectors. The government has responsibility on VET in issues that exceed the competences of the above.

The Ministry of Human Capacities is in charge of public ([74]Public education covers from pre-primary to post-secondary education levels, including vocational education offered from lower secondary to post-secondary education levels.) and higher education where VET within the formal school system and higher education VET ([75]These are regulated by the higher education act not the 2011 VET act, therefore vocational programmes in higher education, per legislation, are not part of VET) are provided. The Innovation ministry and the Ministry of Human Capacities are responsible for framework curricula of VET and general education, respectively. Other ministers are responsible for qualifications standards in their sectors.

The national vocational qualifications register ([76]The national vocational qualifications register (NVQR) – Országos Képzési Jegyzék (OKJ) – in place since 1993, comprises State-recognised (partial, full or add-on) vocational qualifications that can be acquired either in formal upper and post-secondary IVET or outside the formal education system.), the vocational requirement modules, examination regulations and funding of VET programmes are regulated in government decrees and the government approves education and VET strategies.

The National Office of VET and Adult Learning ([77]Nemzeti Szakképzési és Felnőttképzési Hivatal (NSZFH).), supervised by the Ministry for Innovation and Technology, ensures coordination and implementation of national VET and adult learning policies. Its main tasks include:

  • consultative role including preparation of draft legislation for decision-making;
  • qualification and curricula development in VET;
  • subsidy management;
  • operation of VET centres; and
  • career guidance.

The Education Authority is an agency of the Ministry of Human Capacities that operates:

  • the national systems of assessment in public (general) education;
  • the uniform admission procedure to upper secondary education (both general and VET);
  • the secondary school leaving exam;
  • pedagogical counselling services; and
  • qualification procedures within the teacher career system and teacher/school inspections.

The Pest County Government Office is responsible for registering vocational exams and registering and inspecting adult training providers and programmes ([78]As of 1 January 2017, taking over these tasks from the National Office of VET and Adult Learning.).

The employment departments of county/capital government offices, as part of the national employment service led by the Ministry of Finance, provide training support for vulnerable groups.

Social partners involvement – the role of the Chamber of Commerce and Industry

The Chamber of Commerce and Industry has an important role in VET in policy advice, qualifications development for manual jobs ([79]Including standards and framework curricula.), accreditation and supervision of practice providers, provision of apprenticeship contracts (including the chamber guarantee measure ([80]Students are only allowed to participate in practical training at a school workshop or at a company based on a school-company cooperation agreement if there is no company (apprenticeship) placement available to them, which has to be confirmed in writing by the Chamber (or by the Hungarian Chamber of Agriculture in relevant sectors such as agriculture, forestry, food industry and fisheries).)) and career guidance services.

Social partners shape VET policy through participation in advisory bodies, mainly:

  • the National VET and Adult Learning Council ([81]Nemzeti Szakképzési és Felnőttképzési Tanács (NSZFT).), advising strategic policy issues and allocation of development funds;
  • 18 sectoral skills councils (SSCs) ([82]Agazati készségtanács.) were set up in 2018 ([83]The SSCs took over the responsibilities of the national qualification board. Each council consist of 7 to 19 business representatives from the sector. Currently, there are19 SCCs.) operating under the coordination of the chamber of commerce (with the involvement of the chamber of agriculture in relevant sectors) to monitor labour market trends and needs for new skills and qualifications;
  • at country level, 19 country development and training councils ([84]Megyei fejlesztési és képzési bizottságok.) design short-and medium-term VET strategies on local needs, prepare lists of ‘qualifications in demand’ and propose quotas for enrolment places considered for financing VET from the State budget ([85]See Section: VET financing mechanisms - IVET financing.).

VET providers – public education sector ([86]Public education covers from pre-primary to post-secondary education levels.)

Governance of schools has been centralised (2013) and the majority of VET schools (those that came under the maintenance of the ministry responsible for VET in 2015) have been integrated into a network of 44 vocational centres ([87]The number of schools represented in each centre varies from 5 to 19. The number of students in each vocational centre must be at least 2 000 on average in the past three years. Currently, these 44 vocational centres have 380 member schools.). The vocational centres coordinate education and training activities of the member schools, manage their finances and help them offer training better aligned with labour market needs, promoting partnerships with businesses and innovation.

State-maintained VET schools in the sector of agriculture, (and forestry, fishery, food industry etc.) are operated by the Ministry of Agriculture and belong to the network of agricultural VET schools (46 schools).

The Ministries of Interior and of Defence as well as some universities also operate some VET schools that provide sector-specific programmes.

Under the public education act ([88]Act CXC of 2011 on public education.), church and business entities, foundations, associations, etc., can also maintain schools, which can get funding from the central government budget based on an agreement with the minister responsible for VET ([89]The share of students studying in VET schools maintained by churches has increased considerably since 2010, while of those studying in schools maintained by foundations decreased: in school year 2015/16, 11% studied in the former and 7-8% in the latter type, in addition to 5-6% studying in other private schools.).

Provision of practical training

Practical training is part of the curricula of all VET programmes and can be provided in school-based setting or at companies based on an apprenticeship contract (of the learner and the company) or a cooperation agreement (of the school and the company, see Section: 7. Apprenticeship).

Dual VET is provided through apprenticeship training contracts which is an integral part of initial (primarily, ISCED 353 level) VET programmes ([90]See also the scheme fiche on Hungary in Cedefop’s European database on apprenticeship schemes: Dual vocational training based on the apprenticeship training contract:
http://www.cedefop.europa.eu/en/publications-and-resources/data-visualisations/apprenticeship-schemes/scheme-fiches/apprenticeship-dual-vocational-training [accessed 20.3.2019].
) and is provided by companies. Apprenticeships are coordinated by the Chamber of Commerce and Industry ([91]The Chamber of Agriculture assumes the same role in the sectors under its remit of responsibilities, supervising apprenticeships and delivering the chamber guarantee.) which is responsible for accrediting and registering training providers, supporting learners to find a placement at a training provider and registering apprenticeship contracts ([92]More information on apprenticeship delivery is available in Section 7 - Apprenticeships.).

Since 2017, companies may establish joint sectoral training centres which are being set up in order to support the capacity of SMEs and micro enterprises to offer training ([93]Adapted from Cedefop (2019). Spotlight on VET: 2018 compilation: vocational education and training systems in Europe. Luxembourg: Publications Office.
http://data.europa.eu/doi/10.2801/009
).

VET providers – higher education sector

Vocational programmes offered at EQF level 5 are provided by higher education institutions ([94]See also Section
6. VET within education and training system.
).

Higher education VET programmes include a mandatory, one-semester-long (minimum 14 weeks) period of company-based practice in the last (4th) semester. In case that is provided in a block of six or more weeks, it must be organised on the basis of a cooperation agreement between the higher education institution and the company. The company then also has to make a student work contract (hallgatói munkaszerződés) with the student.

CVET/Adult training providers

Learners in adult training must sign a training contract with the training provider. The Adult training act of 2013 – the scope of which only covers courses that award an NVQR qualification or are publicly funded – replaced the former system of institutional and programme accreditation by a new system of licensing. Training providers have to apply for a licence that specifies the courses they offer. The license is awarded for an indefinite time by the Pest County Government Office ([95]Since 1 January 2017, instead of the National Office of VET and Adult Learning (NSZFH).), based on the opinion of an expert committee. All providers should apply a quality assurance system, which must be in line with a framework system ([96]Corresponds to the EQAVET framework:
http://eqavet.nive.hu/#!/grafikon|part=0
) defined by the minister responsible for VET and adult raining. Adult training providers include:

  • public and higher education institutions engaging in adult training as a supplementary activity;
  • other budgetary or State-funded institutions, most notably, regional training centres ([97]These are currently part of the Directorate-General for Social Affairs and Child Protection (Szociális és Gyermekvédelmi Főigazgatóság) and provide training for vulnerable groups, or specialised State agencies that provide mandatory further training programmes for public servants and employees.);
  • the chambers of economy organising the master craftsman exams and offering preparatory training;
  • private training companies;
  • NGOs (non-profit organisations, professional associations, etc.); and
  • employers providing in-company (internal) training for their own employees.

IVET funding

The public expenditure for education including primary, lower and upper secondary education, general and VET streams in 2016 was 2.37% of the GDP.

Learners may enrol free of charge in formal VET to prepare up to two VET qualifications listed in the national vocational qualifications register ([98]The second VET qualification can be obtained free of charge in adult education programmes (in VET provided within the school system).). VET schools are funded by:

  • the State budget and the contribution of the school maintainer that cover the costs of training provision in VET schools;
  • a training levy paid by enterprises ([99]Called ‘VET contribution’ (szakképzési hozzájárulás). ) that finances practical training provision at enterprises as well as the training sub-fund of the National Employment Fund ([100]Nemzeti Foglalkoztatási Alap (NFA); képzési alaprésze.); the latter funds the Adolf Szabóky VET Scholarship programme for IVET learners and various development measures (see sections: Incentives for learners and Incentives for enterprises);
  • the contribution of training provider companies that cover a part of the costs of their practical training provision ([101]20% as per estimates in 2016.).

VET is funded from the State budget on an annual basis ([102]The funding of State-maintained VET centres is based on annual institutional budget plans except for adult education, for which funding is provided on a per capita basis. Church-maintained and other privately maintained VET schools can also receive State funding if they make an agreement with the minister responsible for VET.). The aim of the so-called ‘qualification structure decisions’ regulated by the VET act is to adjust local VET supply to the needs of the economy and reduce skills mismatch. Every year (until the end of March), the county development and training councils based on local labour market information, skills analysis, and forecasts make proposals on qualifications/VET programmes to be offered from the following school year to receive State funding. The final government decision (decree) defines per county/the capital the range of those qualifications and vocational grammar school sectors for which VET school maintainers:

  • can enrol any number of learners without limitations;
  • are not entitled to any funding from the State budget;
  • can request budgetary contribution up to certain student quotas that are defined for each school maintainer in each county/the capital (for both full time attendance and adult education).

The ‘training levy’ and the National Employment Fund (NFA) training sub-fund

There are several ways enterprises may pay the vocational training levy:

  • by providing practical training to students in VET and certain higher education programmes ([103]Per legislation, VET does not cover vocational programmes offered in higher education, which are regulated by the higher education act.) and deduct their costs from the training levy, up to a certain amount, calculated on the basis of a base per capita rate and a coefficient (of 0.7 to 2) defined for each qualification ([104]The base per capita rate is defined in the annual budget laws (in 2018 it was HUF 480 000, EUR 1 528); the coefficients are defined in a government decree.). Furthermore, if the amount of the payable training levy does not cover all eligible costs, these can be claimed from the NFA training sub-fund;
  • by providing or financially supporting employees’ training, the costs of which can be deducted from the training levy up to at most 16.5% (but only if they also train at least 30 VET apprentices); or
  • by paying it directly into the NFA training sub-fund.

According to companies’ estimate, the share of VET student training costs which are deductible/reimbursable from the training levy and own funds was 80%-20% in 2016.

The training sub-fund of the National Employment Fund is also used to:

  • support training providers that do not pay the training levy ([105]E.g. central budgetary institutions in the social/health sector, farmers, etc.) to offer apprenticeships;
  • finance national programmes (and decentralised tenders) to improve infrastructure and technological capacities in VET and adult training programmes;

The training sub-fund can be used by the minister responsible for VET (assisted by the National Office of VET and AL and other advisory bodies on VET) according to the needs and policy priorities, in line with provisions regarding its use in legislation ([106]Act CLV of 2011 on VET contribution and the subsidisation of training development.).

CVET/Adult training funding

Adult training programmes provided outside the formal school system are funded by:

  • participants’ (learner) contributions;
  • employers’ contributions, including the training levy;
  • the National Employment Fund (NFA) employment sub-fund ([107]Its income derives from compulsory contributions paid by employers and employees and budgetary support.) which is used to finance training programmes for the unemployed and other vulnerable groups;
  • the NFA training sub-fund (see above); and
  • the central State budget and international (mostly ESF) assistance, which co-finance various development programmes.

Funding mechanisms include:

  • public funding (of mandatory CVET in the public sector; grants for individuals, primarily for the unemployed and at-risk groups; and grants for micro and small enterprises);
  • public-private cost-sharing (grants for at-risk groups; grants for enterprises; tax incentive for companies, see section: Incentives for learners);
  • collective (employer, employee) investment to finance CVET (training leave and playback clauses specified by the Labour Code).

Teaching staff in VET schools

The employment, initial and further training of all teachers and trainers working in public education (where VET schools are found) ([108]VET schools operate following (both the Public education and) the VET act which regulates VET within the lower-, upper- and post-secondary levels (in public education and also in adult training). It does not regulate vocational programmes offered in higher education.) are regulated by the public education act. In addition, the VET act regulates the qualification requirements of in-company trainers.

The table below lists the types of VET teachers and trainers working in VET schools, their qualification and further training requirements, respective tasks and responsibilities.

Teachers and trainers employed in VET schools, 2018

Title/

tasks and responsibilities

Required qualification

General subject teacher/ Teaching general education subjects

Relevant teacher qualification (master degree) (ISCED 766)

Vocational teacher/ Teaching vocational theoretical subjects

  • Relevant VET teacher qualification (master degree) (ISCED 766 or 767); or
  • a relevant higher education degree and qualification relevant to the taught subject or
  • a relevant higher education degree and qualification relevant to the training field (*)

Vocational teacher or trainer/ Teaching vocational practical subjects in the school

  • Relevant VET teacher qualification (master degree) (ISCED 766 or 767); or
  • a relevant vocational trainer qualification (bachelor degree) (ISCED 660); or
  • a relevant higher education degree; or
  • the secondary school leaving exam certificate and a relevant OKJ qualification and at least five years of professional experience

Instructor at an enterprise (in-company trainer)/ Instructing vocational practice at an enterprise

A relevant vocational qualification, at least 5 years of professional experience and

  • (since 2018) an instructor exam certificate (issued by the Hungarian Chamber of Commerce and Industry, MKIK); or
  • (since 2015) a master craftsman certificate(issued by MKIK); or
  • a relevant higher education degree and qualification (in this case, two years of professional experience is sufficient); or
  • any higher education degree and qualification. (**)

NB: (*) In case there is no relevant VET teacher training, those with a relevant higher education degree and any teacher qualification, or if there is no relevant higher education training, those with any teacher qualification and a relevant OKJ qualification and a master craftsmen certificate can be employed permanently.

(**) Those over 60 and those who instruct practice in one of the catering facilities of outstanding quality (listed in a ministerial decree) are exempt from the latter requirements.

Source: VET and Public education acts.

VET teacher qualifications can currently be obtained in:

  • 4+1-year undivided (long) university programmes; or
  • four-semester master programmes (in which the duration of training can be reduced to three semesters by recognising previous teaching experience in public education); or
  • two-semester master programmes by those who already hold a master diploma in the professional field.

The vast majority of learners in vocational teacher training study in master programmes, in part time, correspondence learning form.

The 4+1 year programmes include subject-specific training (minimum 160 credits), a teacher training module (50 credits) and a one-year-long final external school teaching practice (40 credits). The duration of external teaching practice is one semester in the four-semester master programmes. VET teacher training programmes prepare participants for teaching several subjects of vocational theory.

Since 2006, vocational instructor training is offered in seven-term bachelor level programmes in three areas (business, technology and agriculture) and various specialisations. They consist of subject-specific training, pedagogical studies (including psychology) and practical training, the latter includes a teaching practice and a 12 week-long external vocational practice.

The qualification requirements of in-company trainers supervising the practical training of VET learners at enterprises are defined by the VET act. All instructors must have a relevant vocational qualification and at least five years of professional experience. In addition, since 2015, they either have to hold a master craftsman certificate or a higher education degree or, since 2018, a certificate awarded at the newly introduced instructor training and exam of the Chamber of Commerce and Industry.

Teachers and trainers in higher education VET programmes

Higher education VET programmes have been fully integrated into higher education since 2013, therefore the qualification and further training requirements of VET teachers/trainers involved are regulated and vary by institutions.

VET teachers and trainers in adult training

Adult training legislation – effective for programmes that award an NVQR qualification or receive funding from the central budget or the training levy – makes a distinction between (a) instructors of vocational theory (VET teachers), (b) instructors of vocational practice (in-company trainers) and (c) instructors of language education. The former must hold a relevant VET teacher qualification or at least a relevant higher education degree or any higher education degree and a relevant vocational qualification. Those who instruct practical training must have at least a relevant vocational qualification and five years professional experience.

The continuous training of teachers and trainers working in public education (where VET schools are found) ([109]VET schools operate following (both the public education and) the VET act which regulates VET within the lower-, upper- and post-secondary levels (in public education and also in adult training). It does not regulate vocational programmes offered in higher education.) are regulated by the public education act. The VET act regulates the qualification requirements of in-company trainers but make no provision for the continuous professional development of in-company trainers (see table below).

Teachers and trainers employed in VET schools, 2018

Title/ tasks and responsibilities

In-service training

General subject teacher/ Teaching general education subjects

Compulsory in-service training of 120 hours at least once every seven years (can be accomplished by accredited in-service training, formal education and even some forms of non-formal and informal learning)

Vocational teacher/ Teaching vocational theoretical subjects

Vocational teacher or trainer/ Teaching vocational practical subjects in the school

Instructor at an enterprise (in-company trainer) / Instructing vocational practice at an enterprise

No compulsory in-service training

Source: VET and Public education acts.

Teachers/trainers who have not obtained a new degree or qualification in the past seven years must participate in in-service training that contributes to the renewal of their knowledge and skills. School leaders are required to attend courses that develop leadership skills, including those that prepare for the pedagogical professional examination, available in postgraduate specialisation programmes (ISCED 667 or 768).

The public education act of 2011 introduced a teacher career model that is divided into five categories, with each corresponding to specific career options, differentiated remunerations and possibilities to be promoted. Special provisions concerning VET teachers were introduced in 2015 and 2017, to promote the employment of practitioners with professional experience. An education inspection system was introduced in public education in 2015 that involves external experts to support the assessment and quality development of teachers’ work.

There are no legal requirements concerning the in-service training of in-company trainers.

VET teachers and trainers in adult training

In-service training for adult training instructors is not mandatory, but adult training providers have to operate a quality assurance system, including procedures to ensure the continuous training and quality of instructors. Current practice shows great variety in this respect and most adult training providers offer further training for their (full-time) instructors on an occasional basis only.

More information is available in the Cedefop ReferNet thematic perspective on teachers and trainers ([110]http://www.cedefop.europa.eu/en/publications-and-resources/country-reports/teachers-and-trainers).

Labour market forecasts

Short-term labour market forecasts have been produced by the labour organisation since 1991, since 2005 in cooperation with the Institute for Economic and Enterprise Research of the Hungarian Chamber of Commerce and Industry ([111]Magyar Kereskedelmi és Iparkamara Gazdaság- és Vállalkozáskutató Intézet (MKIK GVI).). Forecasts are made annually, based on a stratified sample of companies, representative for sector and size. They provide information about current and prospective layoffs and demand by sector and occupation groups ([112]https://mmpp.hu).

The labour departments of county government offices also regularly prepare quarterly analyses of prospective layoffs and opening positions planned by companies in the following three and 12 months. These are based on data reported to the given county office ([113]https://nfsz.munka.hu/Lapok/full_afsz_kozos_statisztika/afsz_negyedeves_munkaerogazd_felmeres.aspx).

Since 2008, the Economic and Enterprise Research of the Hungarian Chamber of Commerce and Industry (MKIK GVI) also prepares annual surveys on labour market supply and demand specifically for skilled workers over the course of the next one and four years. These include qualitative information about employers’ satisfaction with the general and vocational competences of VET graduates ([114]http://gvi.hu/kutatasaink/szakkepzes). Data are collected by the local chambers. The results assist county development and training committees to make informed recommendations to the minister responsible for VET about enrolment in VET schools (see section: VET funding mechanisms) and to prepare the county-level lists of qualifications in-demand that serve as the basis of allocating additional funds to learners and enterprises.

One of the tasks of the newly (2018) established sectoral skills councils will be to prepare short and mid-term forecasts to define the directions and objectives of VET development and to propose updates of qualifications and curricula.

Career tracking of VET graduates

The VET act foresees data collection (by graduates, VET providers and employers) for career tracking in the formal school system and in adult training ([115]Programmes leading to State-recognised VET qualifications included in the national register of vocational qualifications or programmes financed by national funds.), implementation is yet pending.

The National Office for VET and Adult Learning will run the national career tracking system of VET graduates, collecting data from the National Tax and Customs Administration ([116]Nemzeti Adó és Vámhivatal (NAV).), the pension insurance system and the public education information system.

Currently, a national project co-financed by ESF ([117]GINOP-6.2.4-VEKOP/16 project titled Developing the quality and content of 21st century VET and adult training.) is developing a system of VET graduate tracking.

Annual VET supply and demand surveys conducted by the Economic and Enterprise Research of the Hungarian Chamber of Commerce and Industry (MKIK GVI) included ‘career tracking snapshots’ to map the labour-market success of those who acquired an in-demand vocational qualification through apprenticeship training. Different methodologies have been used; the latest in 2018 involves surveying a sample of learners in their last school year and then seven-eight months and again 19-20 months after graduation.

In higher education, a ‘hybrid’ system of graduate career monitoring ([118]Diplomás Pályakövető rendszer (DPR).) combining national and institutional level tracking was developed with ESF support in 2008-10. This is based on a different methodological approach (survey of graduates using a questionnaire, three and five years after graduation), and the results and analysis of the DPR ([119]https://www.felvi.hu/felsooktatasimuhely/dpr) data collection are published annually.

See also Cedefop’s skills forecast ([120]http://www.cedefop.europa.eu/en/publications-and-resources/data-visualisations/skills-forecast) and European Skills Index ([121]https://skillspanorama.cedefop.europa.eu/en/indicators/european-skills-index).

The national vocational qualifications register (NVQR)

The national vocational qualifications register lists all formal vocational qualifications (full, partial and add-on) regulated by the 2011 VET act ([122]NVQR (Országos Képzési Jegyzék, OKJ). The register does not include higher VET (EQF level 5) programmes which are regulated by the higher education act.). Qualifications may be acquired by completing a vocational programme, meeting all the complex vocational and examination requirements set for a given qualification and passing the final complex exam. Some of the qualifications in the register can be obtained only within the formal school system, some only in adult training, the rest in both forms. The register was created in 1993 and has since been regularly reviewed and amended ([123]Systemic reforms of the OKJ included aligning it with the ISCED (1995) and the Hungarian Unified Job Classification System (Foglalkozások Egységes Osztályozási Rendszere (FEOR) (1996), introducing occupational groups (2001), a modularised and competence-based qualification structure (2006), a sectoral system (2012) and most recently, alignment with the European qualifications framework (EQF).).

Three types of qualifications are available:

  • a vocational qualification entitles its holder to perform all jobs related to one or several occupations; its vocational and examination requirements typically include several qualification-specific modules as well as modules shared by two or more qualifications;
  • a partial vocational qualification entitles its holder to perform at least one job and its vocational and examination requirements contain only some of all modules of a qualification; no programmes to award it can be launched within the formal school system, except for vocational programmes for SEN learners and the vocational bridging programme;
  • an add-on vocational qualification can be obtained by those who have already obtained a vocational qualification; it typically includes only qualification-specific modules and entitle its holder to perform a new job that requires higher level expertise.

The classification of the register (seven-digit identification number) specifies the level of qualification, if it can be acquired in the formal school system or in adult learning, and the training field for each qualification. Detailed other data are also included in the NVQR register ([124]NVQR table is an annex of the government decree publishing it. Other information included in the register refers to occupational group; vocational grammar school sector; duration in number of years in VET within the school system; duration in number of class hours in VET outside the school system; learning form (full time, evening, correspondence or other in VET within the school system or course work or distance learning in VET outside the school system; level in the national qualifications framework (NQF) (Magyar Képesítési Keretrendszer, MKKR); and the responsible minister.).

Vocational and examination requirements (SZVK)

Standards of a qualification included in the national register (NVQR) are defined in its vocational and examination requirements ([125]Szakmai és vizsgakövetelmények (SZVK).) - published as a decree of the responsible minister - that specify (among others):

  • its entry requirements;
  • the jobs that can be performed by those holding this qualification and the occupational profile;
  • share of theoretical and practical training;
  • duration of summer practice;
  • learning outcomes: identification numbers of its ‘vocational requirements’ modules (see below); and
  • assessment standards: ‘examination requirements’, including any preconditions (e.g., foreign language exam) and the content and form of the exam activities.

Vocational requirements modules

A module may be unique or shared by two or more qualification(s) that belong to the same occupational group or sector. Modules are published in a separate government decree ([126]217/2012 (VIII.9.) government decree on the vocational requirement modules of State-recognised qualifications.) and specify for each work activity:

  • the occupational standards (its ‘task profile’); and
  • the related ‘character profile’ that specifies different types of knowledge and skills required to perform those tasks ([127](i) vocational competences: vocational knowledge and vocational skills; (ii) personal competences (e.g., independence, precision); (iii) social competences (e.g., empathy, comprehensibility); and (iv) method competences (e.g., prudence, practical thinking).) ([128]Though qualification standards were transcribed in learning outcomes as understood in the European qualification framework (EQF) when referencing them to the NQF (Source: Tót, É.; ICF (2016). 2016 update to the European inventory on validation of non-formal and informal learning: country report on Hungary, pp. 3, 8, 10. Report commissioned by Cedefop
    https://cumulus.cedefop.europa.eu/files/vetelib/2016/2016_validate_HU.pdf ), the task and character profiles in the SZVKs modules – and the framework curricula based on them – are not yet defined in the form and language of learning outcomes as understood in the EQF.
    ).

Designing and updating qualifications and standards

Any institution or person can initiate the deletion, modification or introduction of a vocational qualification in the NVQR register by submitting a proposal to the minister responsible for the given qualification (sector). The initiating institution or person must provide detailed justification for the amendment ([129]Supported by:
(a) a discussion of its objective and what alternative options to reach the same result have been considered;
(b) the estimated number of expected training participants per year;
(c) a list of training providers willing to provide the practical and the theoretical training; and
(d) a forecast of the national employment service on the number of jobs that will be available to be taken with the qualification proposed.
).

Proposals are first reviewed by the National Office of VET and Adult Learning ([130]Nemzeti Szakképzési és Felnőttképzési Hivatal (NSZFH).). Social partners are involved in the process through the National VET and Adult Learning Council ([131]Nemzeti Szakképzési és Felnőttképzési Tanács (NSZFT).), whose opinion is consulted by the minister responsible for VET before making a final decision ([132]Social partners participated also in the National Qualification Committee (Nemzeti Képesítési Bizottság, NKB) that was responsible for the continuous development of VET qualification structure and content until 1 July 2018.). Social partners and experts (practitioners as well as teachers) ([133]Teacher experts chosen from the national register of vocational experts who can participate in such development work.) were involved in all major VET qualifications development projects initiated by the government.

Standards can also be updated without modifying the national register, by the amendment of the SZVKs/vocational requirement modules only. In that case, SZVKs are developed by practitioners and teacher experts, commissioned by the responsible body/agency. The Hungarian Chamber of Commerce and Industry ([134]Magyar Kereskedelmi és Iparkamara (MKIK).) has played a special role in qualification design, it was responsible for developing the standards of the majority of qualifications (those that are required for manual jobs). Their role in qualification design is being reviewed in 2019 in relation to the responsibilities of the newly set up sectoral skills councils.

Sectoral skills councils

Under a 2017 amendment to the VET act, as of 1 July 2018, the chamber of commerce coordinates the operation of the newly established sectoral skills councils (SSCs) ([135]Ágazati készségtanácsok.). In case of sectors which fall within the competence of the Minister for Agriculture (including also forestry, food industry and fisheries), this task will be carried out with the involvement of the Hungarian Chamber of Agriculture ([136]Nemzeti Agrárkamara (NAK).).

On the government’s initiative ([137]Following a pilot phase with 13 SSCs created in 2017.), 18 SSCs covering 41 economic sectors, each with 7-19 members, were set up in 2018. These are voluntary associations of stakeholders in a given sector that will support and promote the design, update and development of qualifications standards and align them with labour market and employer demands. Their work includes:

  • monitoring of labour market trends and technological developments;
  • making proposals for new/updated qualifications in the national register and training programmes and skills;
  • making forecasts to share short- and medium-term strategies.

Framework curricula in IVET

VET schools have to prepare their own local VET curricula based on centrally prepared framework curricula issued for each VET qualification in the national register: these define the vocational subjects to be taught and their content and class hours, based on the vocational and examination requirements ([138]SZVK). They are issued in a decree by the minister responsible for VET and adult training ([139]Currently, the Minister for Innovation and Technology.), with the approval of the minister responsible for education ([140]Currently, the Minister of Human Capacities.) and the minister responsible for the given qualification. The protocol of designing and updating framework curricula is defined by the minister responsible for VET and adult training. Curricula are developed by commissioned teacher experts and practitioners and then validated by the National Office of VET and Adult learning.

The local curriculum of general education provided in VET schools is prepared by the schools based on the National Framework Curriculum published in a government decree as well as framework curricula published by the minister responsible for education.

Standards and curricula in adult training

  • Adult training courses that award a VET qualification included in the national vocational qualifications register have to observe the same standards (vocational requirement modules - SZVKs) and framework curricula as those applied in formal school education;
  • Concerning other vocational courses not included in the national vocational qualifications register, adult training providers are free to design and deliver their own curricula and they have to observe regulations of the Adult training act only if the training is financed from the State budget or the training levy ([141]See also Section: VET within education and training system - learning forms - adult training.). Curricula of such ‘supported other vocational training’ have to include all data specified in the adult training act and be designed in accordance with a programme listed in the register of ‘adult training vocational programme requirements’ ([142]Felnőttképzési programkövetelmények (FPK).).

The adult training vocational programme requirements are similar to the vocational and examination requirements ([143]SZVKs) in content and function: they define outcome standards along with NQF level, entry requirements/competences, minimum-maximum class hours etc. for each module. They were introduced by the Adult training act of 2013 to promote uniform and transparent standards in adult training.

They can be designed by anyone and submitted to the Chamber of Commerce and Industry, which is responsible for their registration. Under the chamber guidelines assisting their design, adult training vocational programme requirements have to define learning outcomes for each module, in accordance with the knowledge, skills, attitude and responsibility-autonomy descriptor structure of the Hungarian Qualifications Framework (HuQF/MKKR).

Proposals are approved by a five-member Programme Committee of the Chamber of Commerce and Industry, which includes three adult training programme experts delegated by the Chamber of Commerce and Industry (MKIK) ([144]Magyar Kereskedelmi és Iparkamara (Hungarian Chamber of Commerce and Industry).), one delegated by the Chamber of Agriculture (NAK) ([145]Nemzeti Agrárkamara (Hungarian Chamber of Agriculture).) and one by the responsible minister.

The complex vocational examination

State recognised vocational qualifications listed in the national vocational qualifications register are awarded at the final complex vocational examination. The preconditions of sitting this exam are defined in the vocational and examination requirements of the given qualification:

  • in courses provided in adult training, these include passing a final exam in all modules (‘module exam’);
  • in VET provided within the formal school system, the certificate issued upon the successful completion of the reference school year is equivalent to taking these module exams.

At the final complex vocational examination, learners’ competences are assessed in various (written, oral, interactive and/or practical) exam activities (as defined in the vocational and examination requirements) by an independent examination board. The exam board comprises four members: one is the candidate’s teacher/trainer, the others are experts from the national register of examiners. The president of the board is appointed by the minister responsible for VET and adult training. In the case of qualifications overseen by the chamber of commerce – that make up the majority of the qualifications for manual jobs – he/she is appointed from among the experts recommended by the chamber.

In principle, those who fail to meet all vocational and examination requirements of a given qualification may still receive a partial qualification. In practice, however, this seldom happens. Learners can get exemption from taking a module exam in adult training (those that they have previously passed). Learners in VET schools can also get their prior learning recognised during their training, subject to the principal’s decision.

The national quality assurance system of VET provided within the school system – as part of public education - was introduced by the 2011 Public education act from school year 2015/16. It involves regular external pedagogical-professional evaluation (inspection) of teachers, school leaders and schools, based on their self-assessments as well as the analysis of students’ performance at standardised tests. The three elements of evaluation – self-assessment, external inspection and teacher qualification (within the framework of the national teacher career model, that aims to qualify teachers to enter the next teacher category) – are linked and aligned in several aspects (using the same assessment areas and standards), albeit they serve different purposes ([146]Educational Authority (2018). Önértékelési kézikönyv szakképző iskolák számára. Negyedik, javított kiadás [Self-assessment handbook for VET schools: 4th amended edition].
https://www.oktatas.hu/pub_bin/dload/unios_projektek/kiadvanyok/2019_onertekeles/Onertekelesi_kezikonyv_szakkepzes.pdf
See also the Eurydice country report on quality assurance in Hungary:
https://eacea.ec.europa.eu/national-policies/eurydice/content/quality-assurance-early-childhood-and-school-education-29_en
).

Self-assessment must be carried out once every five years by all teachers and schools and by school leaders in the 2nd and 4th year of their mandate. Based on their self-evaluation identifying outstanding areas and areas for development, teachers, school leaders and schools prepare five-year development plans and carry out organisational and personal development programmes.

The national external evaluation (inspection) aims to evaluate teachers, school leaders and schools with the primary objective of supporting their professional development. It is carried out in all public education institutions once every five years by the Educational Authority (the inspection of a school must be preceded by or conducted in parallel to the inspection of school leaders). The experts involved in the inspection process are peers with significant professional experience in the given sector, chosen from the national register of educational experts. Based on uniform as well as sector-specific standards and using various methods (document analysis, observation, interviews, parent and student surveys) the inspection assesses:

  • teachers’ pedagogical work in the eight teacher competence areas (as defined in the common teacher qualification standards);
  • school leaders’ leadership performance in five areas, including relations with companies providing practical training for IVET students; and
  • the quality of pedagogical-professional work, implementation of the pedagogical programme and development in target areas of the school.

From school year 2018/19, the evaluation standards for VET have been adapted to the EQAVET framework ([147]Educational Authority (2018). Országos tanfelügyelet. Kézikönyv szakképző iskolák számáa. Ötödik, javított kiadás. [National educational inspection. Handbook for VET schools: 5th amended edition].
https://www.oktatas.hu/pub_bin/dload/unios_projektek/kiadvanyok/2019_psze/PSZE_szakkepzesi_kezikonyv.pdf
). Based on the results of the inspection:

  • teachers and school leaders update their five-year development plans; and
  • the school leader prepares a five-year action plan setting out development measures for the school, which is approved by the teachers.

The quality assurance of companies that provide practical training to VET school students is ensured by their accreditation and monitoring by the chambers of economy in cooperation with the VET school. The inspection covers checking the adequacy of personal and material conditions and the fulfilment of legal regulations regarding training provision.

As regards training programmes provided outside the formal school system, the adult training act of 2013 – the scope of which only extends to courses that award an NVQR qualification or are publicly funded – replaced the former system of institutional and programme accreditation by a new system of licensing. Training providers have to apply for a licence that specifies the courses they offer. The license is awarded for an indefinite time by the Pest County Government Office ([148]Since 1 January 2017, instead of the National Office of VET and Adult Learning (NSZFH).), based on the opinion of an expert committee. All providers should apply a quality assurance system, which must be in line with a framework system ([149]Which corresponds to the EQAVET framework:
http://eqavet.nive.hu/#!/grafikon|part=0
) defined by the minister responsible for VET and adult training.

Hungary does not have a nationwide validation system based on uniform principles and procedures. The validation of non-formal and informal learning outcomes appears in some policy documents as an important tool for lifelong learning but there is no evidence of an explicit national strategy ([150]Source: Tot, E.; ICF (2016). 2016 update to the European inventory on validation of non-formal and informal learning: country report on Hungary, p.3. Commissioned by Cedefop.
https://cumulus.cedefop.europa.eu/files/vetelib/2016/2016_validate_HU.pdf
). Arrangements for recognition of prior learning in place in 2018 are presented below.

The VET act provides for the opportunity to recognise previous work experience in the completion of vocational practical training, subject to the principal’s decision. Learners in VET schools can also get their prior learning recognised during their training, subject to the principal’s decision.

Furthermore, in adult training, those who have not participated in training can also take the module exams ([151]See Section: shaping VET qualifications - design - The complex vocational examination.) and then the complex vocational exam. However, though compared to general and higher education, VET is closer to the learning outcomes approach since standards are modularised and defined in competences, one of the main obstacles to the validation of prior learning is that educational and assessment standards are not yet defined in terms of genuine learning outcomes ([152]Tót, É.; ICF (2016). 2016 update to the European inventory on validation of non-formal and informal learning: country report on Hungary, pp. 3, 8, 10. Report commissioned by Cedefop.
https://cumulus.cedefop.europa.eu/files/vetelib/2016/2016_validate_HU.pdf
).

Under the adult training act of 2013, assessment of learners’ prior learning (competences) is compulsory in adult training courses that provide a vocational qualification listed in the national vocational qualifications register and in State-supported foreign language courses; in other publicly supported training programmes it must be carried out upon the request of the applicant.

Validation of prior learning in vocational courses not leading to a qualification included in the national vocational qualification register is also promoted by the fact that curricula must be based on adult training vocational programme requirements, which must be defined in terms of learning outcomes. However, assessment of prior learning is often more like a placement test that aims primarily to sort learners into ability groups and thus to increase the efficiency of training ([153]Idem, p. 6.).

For more information about arrangements for the validation of non-formal and informal learning please visit Cedefop’s European database ([154]http://www.cedefop.europa.eu/en/publications-and-resources/data-visualisations/european-database-on-validation-of-non-formal-and-informal-learning).

Supporting skills for jobs especially in skilled workers’ training, raising the attractiveness of and participation in VET as well as promoting apprenticeship have been high in the policy agenda in recent years. Incentives are in place to support these goals.

Financial incentives in IVET

  • regular allowance and other benefits for learners in work-based training: pay during the summer practice (cooperation agreements) or monthly salary (apprenticeship contracts, see also below). The amount of payment is regulated by the VET act: it is linked to the minimum wage but varies according to the share of practical training in the programme, its form of delivery and learners’ performance and diligence;
  • the ‘Adolf Szabóky VET scholarship’ programme ([155]Previously called ‘the VET school stipend programme’, launched in 2010.) encourages learners to enter VET and train for ‘qualifications in-demand’ (hiányszakképesítés) included in a list established by the local county development and training committees ([156]Eligible students, i.e., those who participate in a full-time vocational programme to obtain their first vocational qualification, one that is included in the county list of ‘qualifications in-demand’, receive a lump sum of HUF 10 000 (EUR 32) per month in the first semester of the first VET grade. In the subsequent semester(s), those with an average attainment of at least 2.51 in a secondary vocational school or 3.01 in a vocational grammar school (on a grading system of 1 to 5) and at most seven hours of unauthorised absence, receive a monthly stipend of up to HUF 30 000 (EUR 96) or HUF 50 000 (EUR 159) in a secondary vocational school programme (EQF 4) or vocational grammar school programme (EQF 4), respectively, depending on their school performance. The number of beneficiaries grew from 16 844 in the 2nd semester of school year 2014/15 to 33 037 in the first semester of school year 2017/18.);
  • the ‘Road to an occupation’ (Út a szakmához) scholarship programme targets early leavers; it offers a small amount of monthly scholarship to disadvantaged learners in VET schools ([157]This programme was originally launched in 2005, as a sub-programme of the multi-component programme ‘Supply for the trip’ (Útravaló). In school year 2017/18, a total programme budget of HUF 580 million (EUR 1.9 million) was available from the ‘Roma scholarships’ section of the central State budget to provide a monthly amount of HUF 7 000 to 13 000 (EUR 23 to 42) to students (depending on their school performance) and HUF 7 000 (EUR 23) to their mentors for 10 months.);
  • the regular stipend ([158]Monthly scholarship of HUF 8 000 (EUR 25) in the first and HUF 10 000 (EUR 47) in the second year, provided since 2015.) provided to participants of the vocational bridging programme; and additional funding for the payment of teachers in these programmes; and
  • some local scholarship programmes for VET school learners, especially in counties with significant industrial activity.

In apprenticeships:

  • monthly salary;
  • paid sick leave/maternity leave;
  • time spent in apprenticeship counts towards pension;
  • reduced cost meals, reimbursement of travel costs, safety and work clothes and other mandatory benefits.

Competitions and media campaigns such as

  • WorldSkills and EuroSkills (2018, held in Budapest);
  • the excellent student of the trade competition for IVET learners in programmes run under the supervision of the Chamber of Commerce;
  • final rounds of VET study competitions at the annual Trade Star Festival.

Financial incentives for adult learners

  • financial remuneration and other benefits provided to apprentices; apprenticeships are available in adult education since 2015. The number and share of adult education participants in skilled workers’ training have nearly tripled in the past three years and have also increased in vocational grammar schools ISCED 344 upper secondary and ISCED 454 post-secondary programmes ([159]See also Section 5 – Share of learners in adult education in VET schools (%), 2010-18);
  • an opportunity to obtain two VET qualifications within the formal school system free of charge:
    • the first one either in full time education (by the age of 25, or at any age in adult education ([160]In any of the flexible adult education forms: full-time (90% of regular full-time), evening courses, distance learning.);
    • the second one in adult education ([161]Up to age 25 in full time adult education, or at any age, part-time (evening courses););
    • acquire (free of charge) ‘add-on’ qualifications built on the first or second VET qualification included in the national register;
    • learners with multiple disadvantages ([162]Criteria defined by law.) or special education needs can obtain any number of qualifications free of charge, and they can study in full time learning at any age;
  • training support ([163]Reimbursement of tuition fees, related expenses (travel and accommodation costs), cost of family member/child care as well as provision of supplementary/compensatory payment.) through the national employment service available to the unemployed and vulnerable groups ([164]The unemployed, women on child care support, people on rehabilitation support, people participating in public work programme and those at risk of becoming unemployed.). Beneficiaries are selected and assisted to choose sector, a qualification-in-demand and a training provider among those available at county level; employers may also launch supported training programmes if they will provide immediate employment;
  • central, regional and county labour market programmes. These include - in addition to financial - other individual psycho-social support, mentoring, work placement or temporary employment and entrepreneurial support. ESF-supported training programmes are in place ([165]Currently with target groups such as: the unemployed in the 25-64 age group and those in public work programmes (Road to the labour market); young people aged 15-24 not in training nor in employment (Youth Guarantee); or those at risk of becoming redundant (Preventing and tackling redundancy). Under the coordination of the National Office of VET and Adult Learning, two ESF-supported programmes for people with low qualifications are also in place.).

Among job seekers participating in labour market training programmes in 2017 71% of beneficiaries were in the age group 25-54 (24% under 25), 59% were women; in terms of level of qualifications they had at most lower secondary education (39%) or a VET qualification (40%).

Learners in training organised by employers are mostly men (75%), aged 25-54 (81%) with a VET qualification (67%). Most attended training for the unemployed (and public workers) and youth guarantee programmes for NEETs.

  • The labour code includes a right to training leave/benefits ([166]Paid or unpaid and support measures, such as pay tuition fees, costs of training materials and examination fees, possibly also travel and accommodation costs, etc.) for employees to attend primary education or under a study contract concluded between the employee and the employer ([167]Tnulmányi szerződés.). In the latter case, after the end of the training programmes, employees are bound to remain in employment for a definite period of time ([168]Usually as long as the duration of the training programme, but maximum five years.).

Incentives for companies to train VET learners

Training costs of VET learners (based on a cooperation agreement with a VET school or an apprenticeship contract with a learner) may be deducted from the training levy and claimed (costs not covered by this amount) from the National Employment Fund (NFA) training sub-fund, on a per capita rate of deductible/reimbursable costs differentiated by qualification (see Section: Funding).

Training providers training apprentices can also spend a part of their training levy on financing workshop development, payment of in-company trainers (in the case of SMEs) and workshop maintenance (in case of training 9th grade VET learners).

Hospitals and other non-profit organisations ([169]Budgetary organisations, foundations, associations, church legal persons, etc.) can also claim training costs from the NFA training sub-fund.

The minister responsible for VET can also provide financial support from the NFA training sub-fund for companies to create or develop training workshops ([170]In 2017, such financial support was given to set up six workshops.). School-based VET trainers ([171]Called practical training managers; since 2015, this formal function is obligatory in all State-maintained VET schools if the number of students is more than 200.) ensure cooperation between companies and the VET schools.

Incentives for companies to provide training for employees

Companies may use part of the training levy they are obliged to pay to co-finance their employees’ vocational and foreign language training. This option is mostly used by large companies, due to strict applicable criteria ([172]This option is only available for companies that also provide practical training to at least 30 apprentices (VET school students) and only up to at most 16.5% of the amount of their training levy.).

The 2017 amendment of the Adult training act extended the definition of ‘internal training’ to include training programmes of the company’s suppliers’ and partners’ employees as well and facilitated short VET or language training courses (at most 30 hours).

Companies may also be supported financially by the State to offer training to employees if they create new jobs for at least 50 people or may participate in ESF-supported training actions for the professional development of their employees (either in-company training or other courses purchased from other training providers). In 2018, ESF support is ensured for two-year training projects targeting large companies and SMEs (respectively EUR 318 000 and EUR 159 000, corresponding to 50-70% of the total training costs).

Career guidance and counselling activities are overseen by the ministry of education as well as the ministry responsible for VET and adult training. Under the VET act, primary schools, VET schools, school maintainers, the chambers of economy, employer and employee associations, the county development and training committees (see Section 2.4) and the national employment service are all involved in such activities, coordinated by the latter. Since 2015 the National Office of VET and Adult Learning (NSZFH) is responsible for the development and supervision of lifelong guidance in VET. It set up a career orientation work team in 2015 to survey and coordinate the career orientation activities of VET centres (the majority of VET schools, see Section 2.4) and develop methodological guidelines. Based on their activities, a large-scale national career orientation event, called the ‘Night of Trades’, was introduced in 2016 (see below).

Under the public education act, career orientation of learners is a responsibility of the teachers. The National Core Curriculum defines it as an important development task, to be provided mainly as part of the ‘Way of life and practical skills’ subject area in lower secondary education. Career guidance and counselling services for primary and secondary school learners are also provided ([173]NSZFH (Euroguidance Hungary), 2017.) by:

  • the county/capital pedagogical counselling services, whose tasks include career counselling of (recommendation of school and training programme type for) learners, based on the professional analysis of their competences, attitudes and interests;
  • the local chambers of economy, who provide career orientation and information services, especially regarding qualifications in high demand on the labour market, by organising career orientation events, factory visits, skills contests for primary school learners, etc.;
  • the 44 VET centres (see Section 2.4), which provide information about their vocational programmes both to learners and adults looking for adult education/adult training opportunities. Currently, 788 teachers provide career orientation services in VET centres and their member schools, i.e., roughly two people in each school (source: NSZFH).

The most important tools of career orientation and guidance targeting primary and secondary school learners include open days in VET schools and career exhibitions and expos ([174]Examples include the Technical career orientation festival in six cities (
http://miapalya.mee.hu/mi_ez_a_fesztival) or the ’Build your future!’ professional expo for the building industry in eight cities (
https://www.epitsdajovod.com).
). Such events are often organised by some or all of the above actors in cooperation with the employment departments of government offices. In 2016, initiated by the career orientation work team of the National Office of VET and Adult Learning, a new nationally coordinated annual event was introduced. On the ‘Night of Trades’, VET schools organise local career orientation events on the same day at the same time (6 p.m. to 10 p.m.) throughout the country ([175]https://szakmakejszakaja.hu/index.php). In 2017, 8 706 teachers in 423 schools in 151 settlements organised 4 647 different activities (exhibitions, interactive programmes, factory visits etc.) at this event, that was visited by nearly 70 000 people. The primary objective is to increase the attractiveness of VET among the wider public and to provide an opportunity for schools to present themselves. An important tool for this is allowing visitors to ‘taste’ different vocations and thus obtain hands-on experiences.

Career guidance and counselling in higher education is offered at career centres that operate in most higher education institutions. Information about HE programmes, including higher education VET, is available on a website of the Education Office ([176]http://www.felvi.hu).

Adults, unemployed as well as employed people, can obtain career information and counselling at the employment departments of the county/capital government offices. A network of Employment Information Counselling centres (Foglalkozási Információs Tanácsadó, FIT központok) operates as part of these, allowing access to tools (films, brochures, tests etc.) that assist career choice and provide career information. Career information and guidance are offered also by some companies, non-profit organisations, county community centres and family service offices.

Online career information, guidance and counselling is available on the National Career Guidance Portal (Nemzeti Pályaorientációs Portál) ([177]https://npp.munka.hu). It provides information on occupations in various formats, links to relevant databases, career orientation tests, online counselling as well as methodological support materials to various target groups, including primary and secondary school learners, adults, parents, experts and institutions.

Please see:

Vocational education and training system chart

Tertiary

Click on a programme type to see more info
Programme Types

EQF 5

Higher education VET

programmes,

2 years,

WBL 40-80%

ISCED 554

Higher education VET programmes leading to EQF level 5, ISCED 554 (felsőoktatási szakképzés)
EQF level
5
ISCED-P 2011 level

554

Usual entry grade

n/a

Usual completion grade

n/a

Usual entry age

18

Usual completion age

20

Length of a programme (years)

2

  
Is it part of compulsory education and training?

N

Schooling is compulsory for learners up to 16 years old.

Is it part of formal education and training system?

Y

Is it initial VET?

Y

Is it continuing VET?

Y

It can be considered as CVET when the learner has previously received an NVQR ([287]The National vocational qualifications register (NVQR) includes all State-recognised vocational qualifications regulated by the 2011 VET act.) vocational qualification.

Is it offered free of charge?

Y

These programmes are offered both in State-financed and self-financed form. Learners can participate in State-financed higher education for up to at most 12 semesters (total allowance for higher education VET, bachelor and master programmes). Quotas are defined annually for the number of learners who may be admitted to State-financed education.

Is it available for adults?

Y

In higher education the same programme may be offered in full or part time or distance learning forms ([286]Part-time forms involve at least 30% and at most 50% of the number of class hours in full time form; distance learning is defined as involving less than 30% of class hours in full-time education.).

ECVET or other credits

120 (ECTS) credit points ([285]https://ec.europa.eu/education/resources-and-tools/the-european-credit-system-for-vocational-education-and-training-ecvet_en)

Graduates can transfer 30-90 credits to a bachelor programme in the same field.

Learning forms (e.g. dual, part-time, distance)
  • full-time education;
  • part-time education (evening or correspondence, in 30-50% of class hours of full-time education);
  • distance learning (30% of class hours)
  • minimum 14-week company-based practice (if it is provided in a block of six or more weeks, it must be organised on the basis of a cooperation agreement between the HE institution and the company; in this case, the company also has to make a student work contract with the learner) ([288]Dual training in higher education is only available in bachelor and master programmes (but ‘dual training’ is different from ‘dual VET’ offered in VET school programmes).).
Main providers

Higher education institutions

Share of work-based learning provided by schools and companies

= 40-80% ([289]The share of practice is defined in the standards – called ’training and qualification requirements’, képzési és kimeneti követelmények (KKK) – of higher education programmes. The most typical is WBL 60-70%.)

Higher education VET programmes include a mandatory, one-semester-long (minimum 14 weeks) period of company-based practice in the last (4th) semester. In case that is provided in a block of six or more weeks, it must be organised on the basis of a cooperation agreement between the higher education institution and the company. The company then also has to make a student work contract (hallgatói munkaszerződés) with the student.

Work-based learning type (workshops at schools, in-company training / apprenticeships)
  • practical training at the HE institution
  • practical training at a company (if provided in a block of six or more weeks, on the basis of a cooperation agreement between the school and the company as well as a student work contract between the learner and the company)
Main target groups

Learners with the secondary school leaving certificate (ISCED 344), who wish to obtain a higher level certificate in a short and flexible programme. Transferability of credits can also help transition to bachelor level education.

In 2017/18, only 4.3% of all learners in higher education studied in these programmes.

Entry requirements for learners (qualification/education level, age)

Entry requirements are:

  • holding the upper secondary school certificate (ISCED 344);
  • higher education VET providers might also require previous VET studies.
Assessment of learning outcomes

Learners who completed all study and examination requirements and the professional practice specified in the curriculum obtain the final certificate (abszolutórium). The higher education VET qualification is awarded at the final exam (záróvizsga) that involves defending a thesis and may also have oral, written and practical parts ([290]A State-recognised foreign language proficiency certificate is also a precondition of obtaining some (but not all) of these qualifications.).

Diplomas/certificates provided

Higher education VET programmes award an ISCED 554 vocational qualification (not included in the OKJ ([291]The national vocational qualifications register, which includes VET qualifications delivered in public education (for VET, this includes secondary and post-secondary levels) or in adult training) since 2013).

Examples of qualifications

Economist assistant in tourism and catering specialised in tourism’, network information technology engineer assistant ([292]These are higher education vocational qualifications, not a higher education degrees.)

Progression opportunities for learners after graduation

Learners having completed higher education VET programmes may:

  • progress to a bachelor programme (where they can transfer 30-90 credits in the same field); or
  • enter the labour market.
Destination of graduates

Information not available

Awards through validation of prior learning

N

Although higher education legislation permits earning (ECTS) credits by validation (of prior learning/work experience), at least one-third of the credits must be earned in the institution issuing the qualification ([293]Tót, É.; ICF (2016). 2016 update to the European inventory on validation of non-formal and informal learning: country report on Hungary, p. 5. Report commissioned by Cedefop.
https://cumulus.cedefop.europa.eu/files/vetelib/2016/2016_validate_HU.pdf
) and it is not possible to acquire the higher education VET qualification by validation only.

General education subjects

N

Curricula of these programmes are modularised and involve:

  • a shared competence module of all higher education VET programmes (12 credits), including development of labour market, foreign language, VET and financial information and communication competences;
  • a shared module of all programmes in a training field (21 credits, including a shared module of the training branch of 15 credits);
  • a VET module (87 credits, including practical training of 30 credits and a specialisation module of 15 credits).
Key competences

Y

Some key competence development is included in the shared competence module of all higher education VET programmes (12 credits) that involves labour market, foreign language, VET and financial information and communication competences.

Application of learning outcomes approach

Y

The standards (called ‘training and qualification requirements’) of higher education VET programmes define learning outcomes in terms of knowledge, skills, attitudes and autonomy and responsibility.

Share of learners in this programme type compared with the total number of VET learners

In 2017/18, only 4.3% of all learners in higher education studied in these programmes.

3.9% (2017/18) ([294]Share of learners in higher ISCED 554 VET programmes compared to the total number of learners in secondary, post-secondary VET and higher education VET programmes (all levels, but excluding adult training provided outside the formal school system); 3.4% of full time learners. Source: Central Statistical Office STADAT database:
https://www.ksh.hu/stadat_eves_2_6 and Educational Authority KIR database:
https://www.oktatas.hu/felsooktatas/kozerdeku_adatok/felsooktatasi_adatok_kozzetetele/felsooktatasi_statisztikak
)

Post-secondary

Click on a programme type to see more info
Programme Types

EQF 5

School-based practice-oriented

programmes,

1-2 years,

WBL 27-64%

ISCED 454

Post-secondary VET (vocational grammar school) programmes leading to EQF level 5, ISCED 454 (szakgimnázium szakképző évfolyamok)
EQF level
5
ISCED-P 2011 level

454

Usual entry grade

13

Usual completion grade

13

14 ([265]For those that are coming from upper-secondary VET but continue in a different vocational grammar school sector, as well as for those who have no prior VET learning the programme takes two-years instead of one. There is also a grade 15 for those who pursue an add-on qualification.)

Usual entry age

18 ([266]Or a year later for those coming from a five-year vocational grammar school ISCED 344 programme (one with an additional language year).)

Usual completion age

19 or 20 ([267]Or a year later for those coming from a five-year vocational grammar school ISCED 344 programme (one with an additional language year). A year later (20) also if studying in a different sector.)

Length of a programme (years)

1 or 2 ([264]Graduates of upper secondary vocational grammar school ISCED 344 programmes that enrol in post-secondary VET in a different sector will complete the programme in two years; learners without any VET prior learning and certificate will also complete the programme in two years.)

  
Is it part of compulsory education and training?

N

Schooling is compulsory for learners up to 16 years old.

Is it part of formal education and training system?

Y

Is it initial VET?

Y

Is it continuing VET?

Y

([270]These programmes are also available to those who have already obtained an VET qualification included in the national register of vocational qualifications (NVQR) qualification, to obtain a second one or an add-on qualification. Also, graduates of skilled workers training (ISCED 353) can also obtain a higher level NVQR qualification in these programmes.)

Is it offered free of charge?

Y

Public education is free of charge for learners up to the obtainment of two VET qualifications; add-on qualifications may also be offered free of charge.

Is it available for adults?

Y

In adult education (available to learners over 16) the same programme is offered in flexible learning forms ([269]Full-time (90% of regular full-time education, up to age 25), part-time (evening classes, 50%), correspondence courses (10%) or other (e.g. distance learning). See also Section 6. VET learning options.).

ECVET or other credits
Learning forms (e.g. dual, part-time, distance)
  • regular school-based full-time education;
  • adult education for learners over 16 available in full-time attendance (90% of regular school-based full-time education) ), part time (evening classes, 50%), correspondence courses (10%) or other (e.g. distance learning) (see also Section 6. VET learning options);
  • practical training is part of the curriculum of all VET programmes and can be delivered in school workshops and/or at companies (see sections on WBL)
Main providers

VET schools that provide these types of programmes ([271]VET schools can provide one or more types of VET programmes. Beside the State, church and business entities, foundations, associations, etc., can also found and maintain public education institutions; private providers can also provide public education services. . The maintainer of most State-maintained VET schools is the Ministry of Innovation and Technology (these schools are integrated into 44 vocational centres with 380 member schools), except for schools providing VET in the sector of agriculture, which are maintained by the Ministry of Agriculture and belong to the Network of Agricultural VET schools with 46 schools.)

Share of work-based learning provided by schools and companies

= 27-64% ([272]Calculated on the basis of framework curricula of general education (i.e., foreign language education in 4 lessons/week, that make up 11% of the total number of lessons in these post-secondary programmes) and for VET qualifications (based on qualification standards that define the share of vocational practice for the whole four upper secondary +one post-secondary years as varying as 30-70%).)

65% of learners received (the whole or a part of) their practical training in companies 2016/17.

 

Share of students by type of WBL and programme type (%), school year 2016/17

NB: (*) Data on cooperation agreements in ‘vocational schools for SEN learners’ are included under ‘secondary vocational schools’ – except for agreements signed in programmes that award a partial qualification, which are included under ‘vocational school for SEN learners’.
(**) including 103 cooperation agreements signed in vocational bridging programmes.
Source: Hungarian Chamber of Commerce and Industry (MKIK), KSH STADAT database http://www.ksh.hu/stadat_eves_2_6

 

Work-based learning type (workshops at schools, in-company training / apprenticeships)
  • practical training in school workshops
  • practical training in a company based either on a cooperation agreement between the school and the company or an apprenticeship contract between the learner and the company ([273]Since 2015 apprenticeship contracts can be signed also by adult education participants, only in evening and correspondent courses the monthly payment is reduced to 60% and 20% of that provided in full-time education, respectively.)
Main target groups

Programmes are mainly targeting graduates from the secondary school years of vocational grammar school programmes (having already the secondary school leaving certificate as well as prior VET) as well as graduates of grammar schools (having only the secondary school leaving certificate) that wish to acquire a technician qualification at ISCED level 454 ([274]These programmes are the so-called VET years in post-secondary of the vocational grammar school programmes which were last reformed in 2015 (effective from school year 2016/17) by changing their name with the intention to increase attractiveness.). These programmes have also become more easily accessible to graduates of skilled workers training ISCED 353 – those aiming to acquire a higher level technician qualification - since the introduction (in 2012) of the opportunity to enter without the secondary school leaving certificate, but with a craftsman certificate and five years of experience; and also because of the introduction (in 2016/17) of the optional two-year follow-up general education programme in secondary vocational schools that awards the secondary school leaving certificate.

Entry requirements for learners (qualification/education level, age)

Entry requirements are:

  • holding the secondary school leaving certificate (ISCED 344, duration is two years, as learners do not have prior VET learning); or
  • holding the VET upper secondary school certificate (ISCED 344); duration is one year if training is followed in the same sector or two years if training is followed in a different sector; or
  • skilled workers without any of the above secondary school leaving certificates, but with an ISCED P 353 NVQR qualification, a master craftsmanship certificate (awarded by the chambers of economy) and five years of work experience may also enrol; duration is one year.
Assessment of learning outcomes

Their framework curricula for VET, based on the vocational and examination requirements of the pursued vocational qualification ([275]All public education (covering secondary and post-secondary levels) VET qualifications are included in the national vocational qualifications register (OKJ / NVQF).) are published by the minister responsible for VET, consulted by the minister of education ([276]Vocational subjects account for 89% of the curriculum, there are only four lessons/week foreign language education in these programmes The local curriculum of general education provided in VET schools is prepared by the schools based on the National Core Curriculum published in a government decree as well as framework curricula published by the minister responsible for education.).

Upon completion, these programmes award an NVQR ([277]The National vocational qualifications register (NVQR) includes all State-recognised vocational qualifications regulated by the 2011 VET act.) qualification at the final complex exam ([278]All public education (covering secondary and post-secondary levels) VET qualifications are included in the national vocational qualifications register (NVQF).). Learners’ competences are assessed in various (written, oral, interactive and/or practical) exam activities (as defined in the vocational and examination requirements) by an independent examination board. In principle, those who fail to meet all requirements may still receive a partial qualification.

Diplomas/certificates provided

VET learners prepare a technician qualification at ISCED level 454 listed in the national vocational qualifications register (NVQR) allowing them to perform several jobs.

Types and levels of NVQR (OKJ in Hungarian) ([279]The National vocational qualifications register (NVQR) includes all State-recognised vocational qualifications regulated by the 2011 VET act.) qualifications delivered in post-secondary vocational grammar school ISCED 454 programmes

NVQR/

OKJ level

Definition

ISCED level (*)

54

advanced level vocational qualification, which requires the secondary school leaving exam certificate and can be obtained primarily in VET provided within the formal school system

4

55

advanced level add-on vocational qualification, which is built on a vocational qualification(s) that requires the secondary school leaving exam certificate and can be obtained primarily in VET provided within the formal school system

4

NB: (*) Qualifications included in the national register refer to attainment levels.

Source: Refernet Hungary, based on 150/2012 (VII.6) Government decree on the OKJ and the procedure of its amendment.

Examples of qualifications

Car mechanic, dental assistant or logistics assistant

Progression opportunities for learners after graduation

Learners having completed post-secondary vocational grammar school programmes may:

  • move on to higher VET ISCED 554/EQF5;
  • move on to higher education bachelor ISCED 665/EQF6 programmes (where they may get their VET studies recognised in a bachelor programme of the same sector, at the discretion of the HE institution); or
  • enter the labour market.
Destination of graduates

Information not available

Awards through validation of prior learning

N

The complex examination that awards NVQR qualifications does not allow for recognition of prior learning (no exemption can be obtained from taking the whole or a part of the exam).

Nevertheless, learners in VET schools can get their prior learning recognised during their training, subject to the principal’s decision. The VET act also provides for the opportunity to recognise previous work experience in the completion of vocational practical training, subject to the principal’s decision.

General education subjects

Y

11% (only one subject: foreign language, in four lessons/week)

Key competences

Y

Curricula involve foreign language education. Standards and framework curricula of NVQR ([280]The National vocational qualifications register (NVQR) includes all State-recognised vocational qualifications regulated by the 2011 VET act.) qualifications define vocational, personal, social and methodological competences, corresponding to the particular task profile, by modules. They comprise several components/parts of key competences ([281]More information is available in Bükki, E. et al. (2016). Key competences in vocational education and training – Hungary. Cedefop ReferNet thematic perspectives series.http://libserver.cedefop.europa.eu/vetelib/2016/ReferNet_HU_KC.pdf).

Application of learning outcomes approach

Y

VET standards (called ‘vocational requirements’) are modularised and defined in competences, but they are not yet defined in terms of genuine learning outcomes ([282]Though qualification standards were transcribed in learning outcomes as understood in the European qualification framework (EQF) when referencing them to the NQF. (Source: Tót, É.; ICF (2016). 2016 update to the European inventory on validation of non-formal and informal learning: country report on Hungary, pp. 3, 8, 10. Report commissioned by Cedefop.)
https://cumulus.cedefop.europa.eu/files/vetelib/2016/2016_validate_HU.pdf), the task and character profiles in the vocational requirements modules – and the framework curricula based on them - are not defined in the form and language of learning outcomes (as understood in the EQF).
).

The vocational requirements modules of a VET qualification may be unique or shared by two or more qualification(s) that belong to the same occupational group or sector. They are published in a government decree (and specify for each work activity:

(a) its ‘task profile’ (occupational standards); and

(b) the related ‘character profile’ that specifies different types of knowledge and skills required to perform those tasks ([283]Though qualification standards were transcribed in learning outcomes as understood in the European qualification framework (EQF) when referencing them to the NQF (in a project led by NSZFH), the task and character profiles in the SZVKs – and the framework curricula based on them – are not defined in the form and language of learning outcomes, as understood in the EQF (Tót and ICF, 2016, p. 10).);

  • vocational competences: vocational knowledge and vocational skills;
  • personal competences (e.g., independence, precision);
  • social competences (e.g., empathy, comprehensibility); and
  • method competences (e.g., prudence, practical thinking).
Share of learners in this programme type compared with the total number of VET learners

16.1% ([284]2017/18. NB: Compared with the total number of VET learners (secondary, post-secondary and higher education VET programmes) in full-time programmes; excluding VET learners attending part-time programmes; excluding VET learners in adult training programmes provided outside the formal school system. Source: Central Statistical Office STADAT database
https://www.ksh.hu/stadat_eves_2_6 and Educational Authority KIR database:
https://www.oktatas.hu/felsooktatas/kozerdeku_adatok/felsooktatasi_adatok_kozzetetele/felsooktatasi_statisztikak
)

Secondary

Click on a programme type to see more info
Programme Types

EQF 2-3

Bridging programmes for those

who have completed at most

two years of lower

secondary education

by age 15

ISCED 351, 352,353

Vocational bridging programme leading to EQF level 2-3, ISCED 351, 352 and 353 (szakképzési hídprogram)
EQF level
2-3
ISCED-P 2011 level

351

352

353

Usual entry grade

SZH/1 ([180]The two grades in this programme are named as SZH/1 and SZH/2 (i.e., not as part of the normal numbering 0-12).)

Usual completion grade

SZH/2 ([181]The two grades in this programme are named as SZH/1 and SZH/2 (i.e., not as part of the normal numbering 0-12).)

Usual entry age

15 ([182]Having completed grade 6 at most, but drop-outs younger than 23 can also enrol in the VET bridging programme.)

Usual completion age

17 ([183]Or older, as the programme is accessible also to adults.)

Length of a programme (years)

2 years

  
Is it part of compulsory education and training?

Y

Schooling is compulsory for learners up to 16 years old.

Is it part of formal education and training system?

Y

Is it initial VET?

Y

Is it continuing VET?

N

Is it offered free of charge?

Y

Public education is free of charge for learners up to the obtainment of two VET qualifications

Is it available for adults?

Y

Drop-outs younger than 23 can enrol in the VET bridging programme.

ECVET or other credits
Learning forms (e.g. dual, part-time, distance)
  • regular school-based full-time education
  • adult education for learners over 16 ([185]However, the vast majority of learners study in regular full time education – in school year 2017/18, only 16 out of 1837 total participants studied in adult education, but even they studied in the full time attendance (90% of regular school-based education) form.)
  • practical training is part of the curriculum of all VET programmes and can be delivered in school workshops and/or at companies
Main providers

VET schools (that provide lower or upper secondary VET) designated by the minister responsible for VET (or by the minister of agriculture in schools in that sector) to provide this type of programme ([186]Beside the State, church and business entities, foundations, associations, etc., can also found and maintain public education institutions; private providers can also provide public education services.)

Share of work-based learning provided by schools and companies

= 7- 41% ([187]The share of work-based learning provided by schools and companies is understood as the share of practical training in the curriculum which is calculated on the basis of the framework curriculum for general education for this programme type (which defines the share of general education and VET) and the standards and the framework curricula of VET qualifications (which define the share of theory and practice within the VET part). As regards the latter, the standards of VET qualifications offered in this programme define the share of practice as between 20% and 70%.) ([188]6.8% of learners received (the whole or a part of) their practical training in companies based on cooperation agreement between the school and the company in 2016/17).)

103 cooperation agreements (Apprenticeships are not available in VET bridging programmes)

Work-based learning type (workshops at schools, in-company training / apprenticeships)
  • practical training in the school workshop
  • practical training at a company (based on cooperation agreements, no apprenticeships available)
Main target groups

Bridging programmes were introduced in 2013 to prevent and reduce early leaving from education and training for young people and adults (up to age 23).

The vocational bridging programmes prepare learners to continue studies in upper secondary education by providing complex general competence development as well as VET, to small groups of 8-10 learners.

Entry requirements for learners (qualification/education level, age)

Learners who completed at most two years (grade 6) of (four-year) lower secondary education by age 15 must take part in two-year vocational bridging programmes offered in designated VET schools.

Drop-outs younger than 23 can enrol in the VET bridging programmes too.

Assessment of learning outcomes

Upon completion, learners take a final exam where they can obtain a certificate on the completion of lower secondary education (EQF level 2) as well as a complex vocational exam where they can obtain a partial VET qualification included in the national vocational qualifications register (NVQR).

At the complex exam learners’ competences are assessed in various (written, oral, interactive and/or practical) exam activities (as defined in the vocational and examination requirements) by an independent examination board.

Diplomas/certificates provided

VET learners receive two qualifications the lower secondary education EQF 2 certificate (education level completion - alapfokú iskolai végzettség) and a partial VET qualification at ISCED P level 351, 352, 353

Types and levels of NVQR (OKJ in Hungarian) ([189]The National vocational qualifications register (NVQR) includes all State-recognised vocational qualifications regulated by the 2011 VET act.) vocational qualifications delivered in VET bridging programmes

NB: (*) Qualifications included in the national register refer to attainment levels.

Source: Refernet Hungary, based on 150/2012 (VII.6) Government decree on the OKJ and the procedure of its amendment.

Examples of qualifications

‘Kitchen aid’, ‘Computer data recorder’, ‘Animal carer’ or ‘Agricultural worker’

Progression opportunities for learners after graduation

Learners having completed the VET bridging programme may:

  • enter the labour market;
  • move on to any of the two upper secondary VET tracks delivered at ISCED levels 344 and ISCED level 353 in grade 9.

Learners who do not finish the programme but complete one year can still enter a secondary vocational school programme (three-year ISCED 353 VET programmes) in grade 9 ([190]In lack of a primary school graduation certificate, the conditions of admittance to secondary vocational school ISCED 353 programmes are: (a) reaching the age of 14; and (b) completion of an academic year in the Vocational bridging programme organised in a secondary vocational school.).

However, less than 20% of learners in VET bridging programmes obtain a partial qualification ([191]Ministry of Innovation and Technology (2019). Szakképzés 4.0 A Szakképzés és Felnőttképzés Megújításának Középtávú Stratégiája, a Szakképzési Rendszer Válasza a Negyedik Ipari Forradalom Kihívásaira [VET 4.0 Mid-term strategy of the renewal of VET and adult training: response of the VET system to challenges of the 4th industrial revolution].
https://www.fvsz.hu/files/hirek/rendezv%C3%A9nyek/2019/szakkpzs-4.0-final_fvsz.pdf
).

Destination of graduates

Information not available

Awards through validation of prior learning

N

General education subjects

Y

Programmes prepare learners to continue studies in upper secondary education by providing complex general competence development as well as VET, to small groups of 8-10 learners.

There are two types of VET bridging programmes depending on the share of general education and VET, which can be 63-37% or 41-59% ([192]Calculated on the basis of class hours defined in the framework curriculum of general education for the vocational bridging programme:
https://www.nive.hu/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=713:szakkepzesi-kerettantervek-302016viii31ngmrendelet&catid=10&Itemid=166
).

Key competences

Y

The curriculum of general education is based on the National Core Curriculum that includes key competence development ([193]The list of key competences in the Hungarian NCC differs from that in the EU recommendation of 2006 in one minor aspect. It breaks the EU key competence of ’mathematical competence and basic competences in science and technology’ into two separate ones, thus in Hungary there are nine instead of eight key competences. More detailed information is available in: Bükki, E. et al. (2016). Key competences in vocational education and training – Hungary. Cedefop ReferNet thematic perspectives series.
http://libserver.cedefop.europa.eu/vetelib/2016/ReferNet_HU_KC.pdf
). Three key competences – foreign language, Hungarian language and competences in mathematics, science and technology – are to be developed as stand-alone subjects.

Development of other key competences is described in the outcome requirements of particular school subjects and depends on local school practices. Standards and framework curricula of NVQR qualifications define vocational, personal, social and methodological competences, corresponding to the particular task profile, by modules. They comprise several components/parts of key competences.

Application of learning outcomes approach

Y

VET standards (called ‘vocational requirements’) are modularised and defined in competences, but they are not yet defined in terms of genuine learning outcomes ([194]Though qualification standards were transcribed in learning outcomes as understood in the European Qualification Framework (EQF) when referencing them to the NQF (Source: Tót, É.; ICF (2016). 2016 update to the European inventory on validation of non-formal and informal learning: country report on Hungary, pp. 3, 8, 10. Report commissioned by Cedefop.
https://cumulus.cedefop.europa.eu/files/vetelib/2016/2016_validate_HU.pdf), the task and character profiles in the vocational requirements modules – and the framework curricula based on them - are not defined in the form and language of learning outcomes (as understood in the EQF).
).

The vocational requirements modules of a VET qualification may be unique or shared by two or more qualification(s) that belong to the same occupational group or sector. They are published in a government decree ([195]217/2012 (VIII.9) Government decree on the vocational requirement modules of State-recognised qualifications.) and specify for each work activity:

(a) its ‘task profile’ (occupational standards); and

(b) the related ‘character profile’ that specifies different types of knowledge and skills required to perform those tasks:

  • vocational competences: vocational knowledge and vocational skills;
  • personal competences (e.g., independence, precision);
  • social competences (e.g., empathy, comprehensibility); and
  • method competences (e.g., prudence, practical thinking).
Share of learners in this programme type compared with the total number of VET learners

0.8% ([196]2017/18. NB: Compared with the total number of VET learners (secondary, post-secondary and higher education VET programmes); excluding VET learners in adult training programmes provided outside the formal school system. Source: Central Statistical Office STADAT database:
https://www.ksh.hu/stadat_eves_2_6 and Educational Authority KIR database:
https://www.oktatas.hu/felsooktatas/kozerdeku_adatok/felsooktatasi_adatok_kozzetetele/felsooktatasi_statisztikak.
)

The number of participants in VET bridging programmes grew from 1 521 in 2016/17 to 2 581 in 2017/18.

VET for SEN learners

2 or 4 years,

WBL 13 – 47%

ISCED 243, 253, 353

School for skills development for special education needs (SEN) learners leading to EQF level 2, ISCED 243 (készségfejlesztő iskola). Vocational school programmes for special education needs (SEN) learners leading to EQF levels 2-4, ISCED 253/353 (szakiskola)
EQF level
2 school for skills development for SEN learners (készségfejlesztő iskola) 2-4 Vocational school programmes for SEN learners (szakiskola)
ISCED-P 2011 level

243 school for skills development for SEN learners (készségfejlesztő iskola)

 

253/353 Vocational school programmes for SEN learners (szakiskola)

Usual entry grade

9 ([199]The extra preparatory year (előkészítő évfolyam) for students with less severe mental disabilities is called 9/E. and is followed by grade 9. The entry requirement is the primary school certificate (ISCED 244) and an official assessment of the person.)

Usual completion grade

10 or 12

Usual entry age

14 ([200]Programmes target students aged 14-23 in need of special education due to mental or other disabilities.)

Usual completion age

18 school for skills development for SEN learners (készségfejlesztő iskola)

16 (17) or

18 (19) Vocational school programmes for SEN learners (szakiskola) ([201]Programmes that award a partial NVQR qualification are two-year-long, those that award a full NQVR qualification are four-year-long and there is an extra preparatory year for learners with less severe mental disabilities.)

Length of a programme (years)

4 school for skills development for SEN learners (készségfejlesztő iskola) ([197]Two years of general education plus two years of ’practical grades’.)

2-5 Vocational school programmes for SEN learners (szakiskola) ([198]Programmes that award a partial NVQR qualification are two-year-long, those that award a full NQVR qualification are four-year-long and there is an extra preparatory year for students with less severe mental disabilities.)

  
Is it part of compulsory education and training?

Y

Schooling is compulsory for learners up to 16 years old.

The programme type targets SEN learners between 14 to 23 years old.

Is it part of formal education and training system?

Y

Is it initial VET?

Y

Is it continuing VET?

Y

These programmes are also available to those who have already obtained an NVQR qualification, to obtain a second one, in that sense it can be considered also as CVET.

Is it offered free of charge?

Y

Public education is free of charge for learners up to the obtainment of two VET qualifications

Is it available for adults?

Y

ECVET or other credits
Learning forms (e.g. dual, part-time, distance)
  • regular school-based full-time education
  • adult education (for learners over 16) ([203]The target group of this programme is learners with SEN due to different types of disabilities; therefore it is delivered almost exclusively in regular full time education. According to the statistics, merely 18 learners studied in adult education in 2017/18 (and only one learner in the previous year).)
  • practical training is part of the curriculum of all VET programmes and can be delivered in school workshops and/or at companies
Main providers

VET schools that provide these types of programmes ([204]VET schools can provide one or more types of VET programmes. Beside the State, church and business entities, foundations, associations, etc., can also found and maintain public education institutions; private providers can also provide public education services. The maintainer of most State-maintained VET schools is the Ministry of Innovation and Technology (these schools are integrated into 44 vocational centres with 380 member schools), except for schools providing VET in the sector of agriculture, which are maintained by the Ministry of Agriculture and belong to the Network of Agricultural VET schools with 46 schools.)

Share of work-based learning provided by schools and companies

= 13-47 % ([205]The share of work-based learning provided by schools and companies is understood as the share of practical training in the curriculum which is calculated on the basis of the framework curriculum for general education for this programme type (which defines the share of general education and VET) and the standards and framework curricula of VET qualifications (which define the share of theory and practice within the VET part). As regards the latter, the standards of VET qualifications offered in this programme define the share of practice as between 20% and 70%.)

37% of learners received (the whole or a part of) their practical training in companies 2016/17.

 

Share of students by type of company-based learning and programme type (%), school year 2016/17

NB: (*) Data on cooperation agreements in ‘vocational schools for SEN learners’ are included under ‘secondary vocational schools’ – except for agreements signed in programmes that award a partial qualification, which are included under ‘vocational school for SEN learners’;
(**) Including 103 cooperation contracts signed in vocational bridging programmes.
Source: Hungarian Chamber of Commerce and Industry (MKIK), KSH STADAT database http://www.ksh.hu/stadat_eves_2_6

 

Work-based learning type (workshops at schools, in-company training / apprenticeships)
  • practical training in school workshops
  • practical training in a company (in grade 9 only in company workshop dedicated exclusively to training) based either on a cooperation agreement between the school and the company or on an apprenticeship contract between the learner and the company
Main target groups

They target learners aged 14-23 in need of special education due to mental or other disabilities ([206]These programmes were last reformed in 2015 (effective from school year 2016/17) by changing their name with the intention to increase attractiveness.).

Entry requirements for learners (qualification/education level, age)

The entry requirement is the primary school certificate (ISCED 244) and an official assessment of their special needs ([207]Issued by an expert committee of the pedagogical counselling services.).

Assessment of learning outcomes

The four-year school for skills development (készségfejlesztő iskola) offers two years of general education and two years of practical skills development to SEN learners. Upon completion of the last grade, learners obtain a certificate on the completion of secondary education.

The two or four -year vocational school programmes for SEN learners (szakiskola) prepare SEN learners to get a partial or a full OKJ qualification ([208]All public education (covering secondary and post-secondary levels) VET qualifications are included in the national vocational qualifications register (OKJ/NVQF).), depending on the type of disability (they may also include an extra preparatory year for learners with less severe mental disabilities). The NVQR qualification is awarded upon passing the final complex exam. Learners’ competences are assessed in various (written, oral, interactive and/or practical) exam activities (as defined in the vocational and examination requirements) by an independent examination board.

Diplomas/certificates provided

Learners in school for skills development programmes receive an ISCED 243 certificate on the completion of secondary education upon completing the last grade.

VET learners in vocational school programmes for SEN learners receive adapted education and training depending on the type of disability. Learners prepare accordingly a full or a partial NVQR qualification at ISCED levels 253 or 353 (two- and four-year programmes, with an extra preparatory year for learners with less severe mental disabilities).

Types and levels of NVQR (OKJ in Hungarian) ([209]The National vocational qualifications register (NVQR) includes all State-recognised vocational qualifications regulated by the 2011 VET act.) vocational qualifications delivered in vocational school for SEN learners programmes

NVQR/OKJ level

Definition

ISCED level (*)

21

basic level partial vocational qualification, which requires no completed school studies and may be obtained in VET provided outside the formal school system, in a vocational programme for SEN learners or in a Vocational Bridging programme

2

31

lower secondary level partial vocational qualification, which is based on primary school certificate (ISCED 244) or the theoretical and practical knowledge elements defined in its vocational and examination requirements (hereinafter: entry competences), and may be obtained in VET provided outside the formal school system, in a vocational programme for SEN learners or in a Vocational Bridging programme

3

32

lower secondary level vocational qualification, which is based on primary school certificate or the entry competences defined in the vocational and examination requirements and may be obtained in VET provided outside the formal school system

3

34

secondary level vocational qualification, which is based on primary school certificate or the entry competences defined in the vocational and examination requirements and may be typically obtained in VET provided within the formal school system

3

NB: (*) Qualifications included in the national register refer to attainment levels.

Source: Refernet Hungary, based on 150/2012 (VII.6.) Government decree on the OKJ and the procedure of its amendment.

Examples of qualifications

‘Carpenter’, ‘Pastry maker’, ‘Kitchen aid’

Progression opportunities for learners after graduation

Learners having completed the school for skills development or the vocational school programmes for SEN learners:

  • may enter the labour market;
  • be better prepared for an independent life (those with more severe mental disabilities in the practical skills development track).
Destination of graduates

Information not available

Awards through validation of prior learning

N

General education subjects

Y

The share of general education and VET is 33-67% or 34-66% in the shorter and longer programmes, respectively ([210]Calculated on the basis of class hours defined in the framework curriculum of general education for vocational school programmes (
http://kerettanterv.ofi.hu). If the extra preparatory year for learners with less severe mental disabilities is also considered (as general education), the share of general education and VET is 46/59%-54/44%.
).

Key competences

Y

The curriculum of general education is based on the National Core Curriculum that includes key competence development ([211]The list of key competences in the Hungarian NCC differs from that in the EU Recommendation of 2006 in one minor aspect. It breaks the EU key competence of ’mathematical competence and basic competences in science and technology’ into two separate ones, thus in Hungary there are nine instead of eight key competences. More detailed information is available in Bükki, E. et al. (2016). Key competences in vocational education and training – Hungary. Cedefop ReferNet thematic perspectives series.
http://libserver.cedefop.europa.eu/vetelib/2016/ReferNet_HU_KC.pdf
). Three key competences – foreign language, Hungarian language and competences in mathematics, science and technology – are to be developed as stand-alone subjects.

Development of other key competences is described in the outcome requirements of particular school subjects and depends on local school practices. Standards and framework curricula of NVQR qualifications define vocational, personal, social and methodological competences, corresponding to the particular task profile, by modules. They comprise several components/parts of key competences.

Application of learning outcomes approach

Y

VET standards (called ‘vocational requirements’) are modularised and defined in competences, but they are not yet defined in terms of genuine learning outcomes ([212]Though qualification standards were transcribed in learning outcomes as understood in the European Qualification Framework (EQF) when referencing them to the NQF (Source: Tót, É.; ICF (2016). 2016 update to the European inventory on validation of non-formal and informal learning: country report on Hungary, pp. 3, 8, 10. Report commissioned by Cedefop.
https://cumulus.cedefop.europa.eu/files/vetelib/2016/2016_validate_HU.pdf ), the task and character profiles in the vocational requirements modules – and the framework curricula based on them - are not defined in the form and language of learning outcomes (as understood in the EQF).
).

The vocational requirements modules of a VET qualification may be unique or shared by two or more qualification(s) that belong to the same occupational group or sector. They are published in a government decree ([213]217/2012 (VIII.9) Government decree on the vocational requirement modules of State-recognised qualifications.) and specify for each work activity:

(a) its ‘task profile’ (occupational standards); and

(b) the related ‘character profile’ that specifies different types of knowledge and skills required to perform those tasks;

  • vocational competences: vocational knowledge and vocational skills;
  • personal competences (e.g., independence, precision);
  • social competences (e.g., empathy, comprehensibility); and
  • method competences (e.g., prudence, practical thinking).
Share of learners in this programme type compared with the total number of VET learners

2.3% ([214]2017/18. NB: Compared with the total number of VET learners (secondary, post-secondary and higher education VET programmes) in full- or part-time programmes; excluding VET learners in adult training programmes provided outside the formal school system. Source: Central Statistical Office STADAT database:
https://www.ksh.hu/stadat_eves_2_6, and Educational Authority KIR database:
https://www.oktatas.hu/felsooktatas/kozerdeku_adatok/felsooktatasi_adatok_kozzetetele/felsooktatasi_statisztikak
)

EQF 4

Practice-oriented VET

programmes,

3 years,

WBL 38-45%

ISCED 353

Three-year secondary vocational school (practice-oriented) programmes leading to EQF level 4, ISCED 353 (szakközépiskola)
EQF level
4
ISCED-P 2011 level

353

Usual entry grade

9

Usual completion grade

11

Usual entry age

14

Usual completion age

17 ([216]19 for those opting for the two-year follow up general education programme leading to the upper secondary school leaving certificate upon completing this three-year programme.)

Length of a programme (years)

3 ([215]Plus optional follow up two-year general education programme.)

  
Is it part of compulsory education and training?

Y/N

Schooling is compulsory for learners up to 16 years old.

Is it part of formal education and training system?

Y

Is it initial VET?

Y

Is it continuing VET?

Y

These programmes are also available to those who have already obtained an NVQR ([219]The National vocational qualifications register (NVQR) includes all State-recognised vocational qualifications regulated by the 2011 VET act.) qualification, to prepare a second or an add-on vocational qualification.

Is it offered free of charge?

Y

Public education is free of charge for learners up to the obtainment of two VET qualifications; add-on qualifications may also be offered free of charge.

Is it available for adults?

Y

In adult education (available to learners over 16) the same programme is offered in flexible learning forms ([218]Possible delivery forms: full-time (90% of regular full-time education), part time (evening classes, 50%), correspondence courses (10%) or other (e.g. distance learning). See also Section 6. VET learning options)

ECVET or other credits
Learning forms (e.g. dual, part-time, distance)
  • regular school-based full-time education (up to age 25)
  • adult education for learners over 16 available in full-time attendance (90% of regular school-based full-time education), part time (evening classes, 50%), correspondence courses (10%) or other (e.g. distance learing) (see also Section 6. VET learning options)
  • practical training is part of the curriculum of all VET programmes and can be delivered in school workshops and/or at companies (see sections on WBL)

The number and share of adult education participants have nearly tripled since 2015, when the opportunity to obtain a second OKJ qualification free of charge was introduced. In school year 2017/18, 27% all learners in secondary vocational school programmes studied in adult education (see figure below).

 

Share of learners studying in adult education in VET schools (*) (%), 2010-18

NB: (*) Titles of VET schools in use as of 2016/17.
Source: KSH, STADAT database, Education http://www.ksh.hu/docs/hun/xstadat/xstadat_eves/i_zoi015.html
http://www.ksh.hu/docs/hun/xstadat/xstadat_eves/i_zoi005.html

 

Main providers

VET schools that provide these types of programmes ([220]VET schools can provide one or more types of VET programmes. Beside the State, church and business entities, foundations, associations, etc., can also found and maintain public education institutions; private providers can also provide public education services. The maintainer of most State-maintained VET schools is the Ministry of Innovation and Technology (these schools are integrated into 44 vocational centres with 380 member schools), except for schools providing VET in the sector of agriculture, which are maintained by the Ministry of Agriculture and belong to the Network of Agricultural VET schools with 46 schools.)

Share of work-based learning provided by schools and companies

= 38-45% ([221]the share of work-based learning provided by schools and companies is understood as the share of practical training in the curriculum which is calculated on the basis of the framework curriculum for general education for this programme type (which defines the share of general education and VET) and the standards and framework curricula of VET qualifications (which define the share of theory and practice within the VET part). As regards the latter, the standards of VET qualifications offered in this programme define the share of practice as between 60-70%.)

61% of learners received (the whole or a part of) their practical training in companies 2016/17.

 

Share of students by type of WBL and programme type (%), school year 2016/17

NB: (*) Data on cooperation agreements in ‘vocational schools for SEN learners’ are included under ‘secondary vocational schools’ programmes – except for agreements signed in programmes that award a partial qualification, which are included under ‘vocational school for SEN learners programmes.
(**) Including 103 cooperation agreements signed in vocational bridging programmes
Source: Hungarian Chamber of Commerce and Industry (MKIK), KSH STADAT database http://www.ksh.hu/stadat_eves_2_6

 

Work-based learning type (workshops at schools, in-company training / apprenticeships)
  • practical training in school workshops
  • practical training in a company (in grade 9 only in company workshop dedicated exclusively to training) based either on a cooperation agreement between the school and the company or on an apprenticeship contract between the learner and the company ([222]Since 2015 apprenticeship contracts can be signed also by adult education participants, only in evening and correspondent courses the monthly payment is reduced to 60% and 20% of that provided in full-time education, respectively.)
Main target groups

They target learners aged 14 and offer skilled workers’ training ([223]These programmes were last reformed in 2015 (effective from school year 2016/17) by changing their name with the intention to increase attractiveness. As of 2016/17, after the completion of these programmes. learners may enrol to an optional two-year general education follow-up programme to obtain the secondary school leaving certificate, which is required for entering post-secondary and higher education programmes.).

Learners that enrol in programmes preparing VET qualifications in-demand (hiányszakképesítés) ([224]Such qualifications and respective training programmes are established annually by government decrees and are based on data collected by the country development and training committees at local level in specific sectors.) may participate in the Adolf Szabóky VET Scholarship’ VET stipend programme ([225]and, based on their grades, receive a lump sum of HUF 10 000 (EUR 32) per month in the first semester of the first VET grade.).

Adults over 16 can also enter these programmes at any age, delivered in the form of adult education (felnőttoktatás), to obtain their first or second NVQR ([226]The National vocational qualifications register (NVQR) includes all State-recognised vocational qualifications regulated by the 2011 VET act.) qualification free of charge.

Entry requirements for learners (qualification/education level, age)

Learners can enter these programmes at age 14, upon completion of the eight years of primary school (end of lower secondary education) and holding the primary school certificate (ISCED 244) or upon completing at least one year of a vocational bridging programme ([227]Pursuant to the Public education act, schools may select learners based on their performance in primary school and at a uniform secondary school entry exam taken in maths and Hungarian (and, in case the number of applicants were twice as much as available spaces on average in the past three years, also an oral exam organised by the school). However, secondary vocational schools typically are not selective and they do not organise entry exams.).

Young people and adults over 16 can enter these programmes at any age, delivered in the form of adult education (felnőttoktatás).

Assessment of learning outcomes

Since school year 2013/14, under the new VET and public education acts published in 2011, these programmes provide three years of dual vocational training. The majority of learners are apprentices.

Their framework curricula for VET, based on the vocational and examination requirements of the pursued full/partial VET qualification ([228]All public education (covering secondary and post-secondary levels) VET qualifications are included in the national vocational qualifications register (OKJ/NVQF).) are published by the minister responsible for VET, consulted by the minister of education. Their framework curriculum for general education ([229]The local curriculum of general education provided in VET schools is prepared by the schools based on the National Framework Curriculum published in a government decree as well as framework curricula published by the minister responsible for education.) defines the share of general education and VET as 36-64%.

Upon completion, these programmes award a full VET qualification at the final complex exam ([230]All public education (covering secondary and post-secondary levels) VET qualifications are included in the national vocational qualifications register (OKJ/NVQF).). Learners’ competences are assessed in various (written, oral, interactive and/or practical) exam activities (as defined in the vocational and examination requirements) by an independent examination board. In principle, those who fail to meet all requirements may still receive a partial qualification.

A follow-up optional two-year general education programme leading to the ‘secondary school leaving certificate’ (érettségi bizonyítvány, ISCED 344) awarded at the secondary school leaving exam is also available (since school year 2016/17) to those wishing to access post-secondary or higher education.

Diplomas/certificates provided

Learners in three-year vocational secondary school ISCED 353 programmes receive a certificate on the completion of secondary education upon completing the last grade. They also get a full NVQR qualification at ISCED levels 353 at the final complex exam.

Those moving on to the additional and optional two-year general education follow up programme and succeed at the final exam receive also the (upper) secondary school leaving certificate (ISCED 344) allowing access to higher level studies at post-secondary VET and/or higher VET.

Types and levels of NVQR (OKJ in Hungarian) ([231]The National vocational qualifications register (NVQR) includes all State-recognised vocational qualifications regulated by the 2011 VET act.) vocational qualifications delivered in skilled workers’ training programmes

NVQR/OKJ level

Definition

ISCED level (*)

34

secondary level vocational qualification, which is based on primary school certificate or the entry competences defined in the vocational and examination requirements and may be typically obtained in VET provided within the formal school system

3

35

secondary level add-on vocational qualification, which is built on a qualification(s) that requires primary school certificate and can typically be obtained in VET provided within the formal school system

3

NB: (*) Qualifications included in the national register refer to attainment levels

Source: Refernet Hungary, based on 150/2012 (VII.6) Government decree on the OKJ and the procedure of its amendment.

Examples of qualifications

Cook, electrician or carpenter

Progression opportunities for learners after graduation

Learners having completed the secondary vocational school (skilled workers’ training) programme:

  • may enter the labour market;
  • enrol in the additional/optional follow up two-year general education programme to prepare the secondary school leaving certificate (ISCED 344); and move on to post-secondary VET/ISCED 454 programmes or higher VET/ISCED 554 programmes;
  • those without the end of secondary school leaving certificate (ISCED 344), but who hold a master craftsman certificate (awarded by the chambers of economy) and have five years relevant working experience may also access post-secondary VET/ISCED 454 programmes.
Destination of graduates

According to a 2012 study, around one third of graduates of skilled workers’ training (of the previous form) ([232]The structure and curriculum of skilled workers training at ISCED 353 were transformed as of 2013/14 as well as 2016/17 (see Section: VET learning options).) were studying two years after graduation (26% in full time, 9% in adult education while also working) ([233]Fehérvári, A. (2016). Pályakövetési vizsgálatok a szakképzésben. Education 2016/1, p. 76.
http://folyoiratok.ofi.hu/educatio/palyakovetesi-vizsgalatok-a-szakkepzesben
).

Awards through validation of prior learning

N

The complex examination that awards NVQR qualifications upon completion of VET programmes does not allow for recognition of prior learning (no exemption can be obtained from taking the whole or a part of the exam). Nevertheless, learners in VET schools can get their prior learning recognised during their training, subject to the principal’s decision. The VET act also provides for the opportunity to recognise previous work experience in the completion of vocational practical training, subject to the principal’s decision.

General education subjects

Y

36%

Their framework curriculum for general education ([234]The local curriculum of general education provided in VET schools is prepared by the schools based on the national framework curriculum published in a government decree as well as framework curricula published by the minister responsible for education.) define the share of general education and VET as 36-63%.

Key competences

Y

The curriculum of general education is based on the National Core Curriculum that includes key competence development ([235]The list of key competences in the Hungarian NCC differs from that in the EU recommendation of 2006 in one minor aspect. It breaks the EU key competence of ’mathematical competence and basic competences in science and technology’ into two separate ones, thus in Hungary there are nine instead of eight key competences. More detailed information is available in: Bükki, E. et al. (2016). Key competences in vocational education and training – Hungary.Cedefop ReferNet thematic perspectives series.
http://libserver.cedefop.europa.eu/vetelib/2016/ReferNet_HU_KC.pdf
). Three key competences – foreign language, Hungarian language and competences in mathematics, science and technology – are to be developed as stand-alone subjects. Development of other key competences is described in the outcome requirements of particular school subjects and depends on local school practices. Standards and framework curricula of NVQR qualifications define vocational, personal, social and methodological competences, corresponding to the particular task profile, by modules. They comprise several components/parts of key competences.

Application of learning outcomes approach

Y

VET standards (called ‘vocational requirements’) are modularised and defined in competences, but they are not yet defined in terms of genuine learning outcomes ([236]Though qualification standards were transcribed in learning outcomes as understood in the European qualification framework (EQF) when referencing them to the NQF (Source: Tót, É.; ICF (2016). 2016 update to the European inventory on validation of non-formal and informal learning: country report on Hungary, pp. 3, 8, 10. Report commissioned by Cedefop.
https://cumulus.cedefop.europa.eu/files/vetelib/2016/2016_validate_HU.pdf ), the task and character profiles in the vocational requirements modules – and the framework curricula based on them – are not defined in the form and language of learning outcomes (as understood in the EQF).
).

The vocational requirements modules of a VET qualification may be unique or shared by two or more qualification(s) that belong to the same occupational group or sector. They are published in a government decree ([237]217/2012 (VIII.9) Government decree on the vocational requirement modules of State-recognised qualifications.) and specify for each work activity:

(a) its ‘task profile’ (occupational standards); and

(b) the related ‘character profile’ that specifies different types of knowledge and skills required to perform those tasks:

  • vocational competences: vocational knowledge and vocational skills;
  • personal competences (e.g., independence, precision);
  • social competences (e.g., empathy, comprehensibility); and
  • method competences (e.g., prudence, practical thinking).
Share of learners in this programme type compared with the total number of VET learners

32% ([238]2017/18. NB: Compared with the total number of VET learners (secondary, post-secondary and higher education VET programmes) in full- or part-time programmes; excluding VET learners in adult training programmes provided outside the formal school system. Source: Central Statistical Office STADAT database:
https://www.ksh.hu/stadat_eves_2_6 and Educational Authority KIR database:
https://www.oktatas.hu/felsooktatas/kozerdeku_adatok/felsooktatasi_adatok_kozzetetele/felsooktatasi_statisztikak.
)

EQF 4

School-based theory-focused

VET programmes,

4 (5) years,

WBL10-26%

ISCED 344

Vocational grammar school (theory-focused) programmes leading to EQF level 4, ISCED 344 (szakgimnázium középiskolai évfolyamok)
EQF level
4
ISCED-P 2011 level

344 ([239]Learners enrolled in this programme can opt to prepare in grades 11-12 also to receive a vocational qualification included in the national vocational qualifications register (NVQR) at national NVQR levels 31, 32, 34, 51 and 52. Such qualifications are not yet referenced to ISCED P 2011.)

Usual entry grade

9 ([241]Or 9/Ny, if an additional language year is added (providing foreign language education in the first year).)

Usual completion grade

12

Usual entry age

14

Usual completion age

18 ([242]19 if an additional language year is added.)

Length of a programme (years)

4 ([240]5 if an additional language year is added (providing foreign language education in the first year).)

  
Is it part of compulsory education and training?

Yes and no

Schooling is compulsory for learners up to 16 years old.

Is it part of formal education and training system?

Y

Is it initial VET?

Y

Is it continuing VET?

N

Is it offered free of charge?

Y

Public education is free of charge for learners up to the obtainment of the secondary school leaving certificate and two VET qualifications.

Is it available for adults?

Y

In adult education (available to learners over 16) the same programme is offered in flexible learning forms ([244]Full-time (90% of regular full-time education), part time (evening classes, 50%), correspondence courses (10%) or other (e.g. distance learning). See also Section 6. VET learning options.)

ECVET or other credits
Learning forms (e.g. dual, part-time, distance)
  • regular school-based full-time education (up to age 25)
  • adult education for learners over 16 available in full-time attendance (90% of regular school-based full-time education), part time (evening classes, 50%), correspondence courses (10%) or other (e.g. distance learning) (see also Section 6. VET learning options)
  • practical training is part of the curriculum of all VET programmes and can be delivered in school workshops and/or at companies (see sections on WBL) ([245]Following the December 2017 law amendment, effective from 2019/20, apprenticeship may be offered in grades 11 and 12.)
Main providers

VET schools that provide these types of programmes ([246]VET schools can provide one or more types of VET programmes. Beside the State, church and business entities, foundations, associations, etc., can also found and maintain public education institutions; private providers can also provide public education services. The maintainer of most State-maintained VET schools is the Ministry of Innovation and Technology (these schools are integrated into 44 vocational centres with 380 member schools), except for schools providing VET in the sector of agriculture, which are maintained by the Ministry of Agriculture and belong to the Network of Agricultural VET schools with 46 schools.)

Share of work-based learning provided by schools and companies

= 10-26% ([247]The share of work-based learning provided by schools and companies is understood as the share of practical training in the curriculum which is calculated on the basis of the framework curriculum for general education for this programme type (which defines the share of general education and VET) and the standards and framework curricula of VET qualifications (which define the share of theory and practice within the VET part). As regards the latter, the standards of VET qualifications offered in this programme define the share of practice as between 30-70%.)

22.7% (in companies, via a cooperation agreement 2016/17)

 

Share of students by type of WBL and programme type (%), school year 2016/17

NB: (*) Data on cooperation agreements in ‘vocational schools for SEN learners’ are included under ‘secondary vocational schools’ – except for agreements signed in programmes that award a partial qualification, which are included under ‘vocational school for SEN learners’.
(**) Including 103 cooperation agreements signed in vocational bridging programmes.
Source: Hungarian Chamber of Commerce and Industry (MKIK), KSH STADAT database http://www.ksh.hu/stadat_eves_2_6

 

Work-based learning type (workshops at schools, in-company training / apprenticeships)
  • practical training in school workshops
  • practical training in a company based either on a cooperation agreement between the school and the company or (as of 2018) an apprenticeship contract between the learner and the company in grades 11 and 12 ([248]Since 2015 apprenticeship contracts can be signed also by adult education participants, only in evening and correspondent courses the monthly payment is reduced to 60% and 20% of that provided in full-time education, respectively.)
Main target groups

They target learners aged 14, and provide four years of combined general education and VET (some programmes may have an extra ‘foreign language preparatory’ year) ([249]These programmes were last reformed in 2017 (effective from school year 2017/18) by providing the option to participate in a programme preparing for an ‘additional vocational qualification’ in grade 11-12, awarded at a complex exam organised in grade 12.).

Graduates with the secondary school leaving certificate (ISCED 344) can continue studies either in post-secondary VET (ISCED 454 VET years of secondary grammar school programmes) or in higher education.

Entry requirements for learners (qualification/education level, age)

The entry requirement is holding the primary school certificate (EQF 2) and popular schools may select learners based on their performance in primary school and at a uniform secondary school entry exam taken in maths and Hungarian (and possibly also oral exam organised by the school).

Learners with the primary school (primary and lower secondary) education certificate entering these programmes at age 14 (grade 9), and older learners may also enrol in grade 9 ([250]Including graduates of the VET bridging programme.).

Young people and adults over 16 can enter these programmes at any age, delivered in the form of adult education (felnőttoktatás).

Assessment of learning outcomes

Following the 2015 VET reform, since 2016/17 learners take the ‘VET secondary school leaving exam’ ([251]Szakmai érettségi vizsga.) at the end of the four-year programmes. This differs from the exam taken in grammar schools in that - in addition to the four mandatory general education exam subjects (Hungarian language and literature, Mathematics, History and a foreign language) - the fifth optional exam subject is replaced by a mandatory vocational subject. The vocational secondary school leaving certificate therefore qualifies holders not only to progress to post-secondary/higher education but also to perform at least one job ([252]Such as ‘IT equipment repairman’ or ‘Assistant nurse’. This job (one listed in the Hungarian Standard Classification of Occupations, FEOR) is specified for each of the vocational grammar school sectors in an Annex of the government decree about the OKJ qualification (e.g. ‘solarium operator’ for the sector ‘Beauty’).).

New legislation in December 2017 introduced the possibility obtain an ‘additional vocational qualification’ that will be awarded (first in 2019/20) at the final complex examination organised in grade 12, a few months before the secondary school leaving exam.

At the complex exam, learners’ competences are assessed in various (written, oral, interactive and/or practical) exam activities (as defined in the vocational and examination requirements) by an independent examination board.

Diplomas/certificates provided

Learners in upper secondary vocational grammar school ISCED 344 programmes take the final vocational secondary school leaving exam upon completion of the upper secondary grades. This awards the VET secondary school leaving certificate (szakmai érettségi bizonyítvány, ISCED 344) that entitles them to progress on to post-secondary/higher education as well as to perform at least one job in the pursued vocational grammar school sector (since 2016/17) ([253]See previous entry: Assessment of learning outcomes.).

Learners might opt in grade 10 to prepare in grades 11-12 also an ‘additional vocational qualification’ (mellékszakképesítés), an NVQR qualification from among those specified in the annex of the government decree on the NVQR ([254]The National vocational qualifications register (NVQR) includes all State-recognised vocational qualifications regulated by the 2011 VET act.) for each vocational grammar school sector. It is awarded at the complex exam organised in grade 12, a few months before the VET secondary school leaving exam ([255]Therefore, if the pursued additional vocational qualification is of NVQR level 51 or 52, the learner will receive that qualification only upon successfully passing the VET secondary school exam. The equivalence to ISCED P levels in not available.).

Types and levels of NVQR (OKJ in Hungarian) ([256]The National vocational qualifications register (NVQR) includes all State-recognised vocational qualifications regulated by the 2011 VET act.) ‘additional vocational qualifications’ optionally delivered in upper secondary vocational grammar school ISCED 344 programmes

NVQR/OKJ level

Definition

ISCED level (*)

31

lower secondary level partial vocational qualification, which is based on primary school certificate (ISCED 244) or the theoretical and practical knowledge elements defined in its vocational and examination requirements (hereinafter: entry competences), and may be obtained in VET provided outside the formal school system, in a vocational programme for SEN learners or in a Vocational Bridging programme

3

32

lower secondary level vocational qualification, which is based on primary school certificate or the entry competences defined in the vocational and examination requirements and may be obtained in VET provided outside the formal school system

3

34

secondary level vocational qualification, which is based on primary school certificate or the entry competences defined in the vocational and examination requirements and may be typically obtained in VET provided within the formal school system

3

51

upper secondary level partial vocational qualification, which requires the secondary school leaving exam certificate and can be obtained in VET provided outside the formal school system

4

52

upper secondary level vocational qualification, which requires the secondary school leaving exam certificate and can be obtained in VET provided outside the formal school system

4

NB: (*) Qualifications included in the national register refer to attainment levels.

Source: Refernet Hungary, based on 150/2012 (VII.6) Government decree on the OKJ and the procedure of its amendment.

Examples of qualifications

The VET secondary school certificate qualifies for at least one job listed in the Hungarian Standard Classification of Occupations (FEOR), as specified for each of the vocational grammar school sectors in an Annex of the government decree about the NQR – examples: solarium operator, electronic equipment mechanic and operator, waiter.

Examples for the optionally obtainable ‘additional vocational qualification’: dental assistant, social carer, mining technician.

Progression opportunities for learners after graduation

Learners having completed the four-year ISCED 344 vocational grammar school programmes may:

  • enrol in post-secondary ISCED 454/EQF5 programmes (called ‘VET years of vocational grammar school’ programmes) to study either in the same sector (one year programme) or a different sector (two-year programme);
  • move on to higher VET ISCED 554/EQF5 programmes offered in higher education institutions;
  • move on to higher education bachelor ISCED 665/EQF6 programmes (where they can get extra points at the admission procedure if applying for a bachelor programme in the same sector); or
  • enter the labour market.

46% of learners in these ISCED 344 upper secondary programmes of vocational grammar school do not continue studies in the post-secondary year to finish their VET programme (to obtain an ISCED 454 vocational qualification) ([257]Ministry of Innovation and Technology (2019). Szakképzés 4.0 A Szakképzés és Felnőttképzés Megújításának Középtávú Stratégiája, a Szakképzési Rendszer Válasza a Negyedik Ipari Forradalom Kihívásaira. [VET 4.0 Mid-term strategy of the renewal of VET and adult training, response of the VET system to challenges of the 4th industrial revolution].). The majority of these learners move on to higher education or continue studies in post-secondary VET in another VET sector (where their previous VET learning is not recognised).

Destination of graduates

Information not available

Awards through validation of prior learning

N

The complex examination that awards NVQR ([258]The National vocational qualifications register (NVQR) includes all State-recognised vocational qualifications regulated by the 2011 VET act.) qualifications does not allow for recognition of prior learning (no exemption can be obtained from taking the whole or a part of the exam). Nevertheless, learners in VET schools can get their prior learning recognised during their training, subject to the principal’s decision. The VET act also provides for the opportunity to recognise previous work experience in the completion of vocational practical training, subject to the principal’s decision.

General education subjects

Y

66% ([259]The local curriculum of general education provided in VET schools is prepared by the schools based on the national framework curriculum published in a government decree as well as framework curricula published by the minister responsible for education.)

Key competences

Y

The curriculum of general education is based on the National Core Curriculum that includes key competence development ([260]The list of key competences in the Hungarian NCC differs from that in the EU Recommendation of 2006 in one minor aspect. It breaks the EU key competence of ’mathematical competence and basic competences in science and technology’ into two separate ones, thus in Hungary there are nine instead of eight key competences. More detailed information is available in Bükki, E. et al. (2016). Key competences in vocational education and training – Hungary. Cedefop ReferNet thematic perspectives series.http://libserver.cedefop.europa.eu/vetelib/2016/ReferNet_HU_KC.pdf). Three key competences – foreign language, Hungarian language and competences in mathematics, science and technology – are to be developed as stand-alone subjects. Development of other key competences is described in the outcome requirements of particular school subjects and depends on local school practices. Standards and framework curricula of NVQR qualifications define vocational, personal, social and methodological competences, corresponding to the particular task profile, by modules. They comprise several components/parts of key competences.

Application of learning outcomes approach

Y

VET standards (called ‘vocational requirements’) are modularised and defined in competences, but they are not yet defined in terms of genuine learning outcomes ([261]Though qualification standards were transcribed in learning outcomes as understood in the European qualification framework (EQF) when referencing them to the NQF (Source: Tót, É.; ICF (2016). 2016 update to the European inventory on validation of non-formal and informal learning: country report Hungary, pp. 3, 8, 10. Report commissioned by Cedefop.
https://cumulus.cedefop.europa.eu/files/vetelib/2016/2016_validate_HU.pdf ), the task and character profiles in the vocational requirements modules – and the framework curricula based on them - are not defined in the form and language of learning outcomes (as understood in the EQF).
).

The vocational requirements modules of a VET qualification may be unique or shared by two or more qualification(s) that belong to the same occupational group or sector. They are published in a separate government decree and specify for each work activity:

(a) its ‘task profile’ (occupational standards); and

(b) the related ‘character profile’ that specifies different types of knowledge and skills required to perform those tasks ([262]Though qualification standards were transcribed in learning outcomes as understood in the European qualification framework (EQF) when referencing them to the NQF (in a project led by NSZFH), the task and character profiles in the SZVKs – and the framework curricula based on them - are not defined in the form and language of learning outcomes – as understood in the EQF (Tót and ICF, 2016, p. 10).);

  • vocational competences: vocational knowledge and vocational skills;
  • personal competences (e.g., independence, precision);
  • social competences (e.g., empathy, comprehensibility); and
  • method competences (e.g., prudence, practical thinking).
Share of learners in this programme type compared with the total number of VET learners

48.2% ([263]2017/18. NB: Compared with the total number of VET learners (secondary, post-secondary and higher education VET programmes) in full-time programmes; excluding VET learners attending part-time programmes; excluding VET learners in adult training programmes provided outside the formal school system. Source: Central Statistical Office STADAT database:
https://www.ksh.hu/stadat_eves_2_6 and Educational Authority KIR database:
https://www.oktatas.hu/felsooktatas/kozerdeku_adatok/felsooktatasi_adatok_kozzetetele/felsooktatasi_statisztikak
)

VET available to adults (formal and non-formal)

Programme Types
Not available

General themes

VET in Bulgaria comprises the following main features:

  • VET governance is multi-layered (national, regional, local);
  • there are four  VET qualification levels (ranging from EQF [1]European qualifications framework for lifelong learning (EQF). The European qualifications framework for lifelong learning is a common European reference framework whose purpose is to make qualifications more readable and understandable across different countries and systems. Covering qualifications at all levels and in all sub-systems of education and training, it provides a comprehensive overview over qualifications in the 39 European countries currently involved in its implementation. The core of the European qualifications framework. is its eight reference levels defined in terms of learning outcomes, i.e. knowledge, skills and autonomy-responsibility. Learning outcomes express what individuals know, understand and are able to do at the end of a learning process. Countries develop national qualifications frameworks (NQFs) to implement the European qualifications framework. The implementation of the European qualifications framework was based on the Recommendation on the European qualifications framework for lifelong learning adopted by the European Parliament and the Council on 23 April 2008(EC 111/01/2008). A revised and strengthened Recommendation on the European qualifications framework (EC/189/03/2017) was adopted on 22 May 2017 by the Education, Youth, Culture and Sport Council. The purpose of this revised recommendation is to ensure the continuity as well as a further deepening of the European qualifications framework.
    level 2 to EQF level 5);
  • dual VET (introduced in 2014) remains a major challenge for the country;
  • state educational standards play a major role in shaping qualifications and curricula.

Distinctive features [2]Adapted from Cedefop (2018). Spotlight on vocational education and training in Bulgaria. Luxembourg: Publications Office. http://www.cedefop.europa.eu/files/8120_en.pdf

VET is provided at secondary and post-secondary (non-tertiary) levels. There are more learners in VET compared with general education: 51.7% of the total secondary education population in 2017 and 54,5 % in 2018. Secondary general education schools may also open VET classes by a special order of the Education Minister. This option is popular in small towns and rural areas.

Since 2016/17, secondary education has been offered in two stages. This improves access to VET, as learners may now choose their education path also after completing grade 10.

In the national context, the term initial VET is only used to refer to programmes leading learners to their first qualification, such as textile worker qualification at EQF levels 2 or its part.

VET programmes are pursued afterwards; for example, textile production operator and textile technician qualifications at EQF level 3 and 4 are considered continuing VET.

According to the pre-school and school education act and the VET act, the acquisition of vocational qualifications is regulated by State educational standards. These standards exist for most VET qualifications. VET qualifications at all levels (EQF 2 to 5) are learning outcomes based.

Following the European credit system for VET (ECVET) [3]https://ec.europa.eu/education/resources-and-tools/the-european-credit-system-for-vocational-education-and-training-ecvet_en
principles, recent qualifications comprise units of learning outcomes, although a credit system is not yet fully established.

The legal basis for validation of non-formal and informal learning in VET has been in place since 2015 and procedures and quality assurance criteria have been developed. Implementation of the Bulgarian qualifications framework will ease putting validation arrangements in place.

 

To make VET more responsive to labour market needs, the pre-school and school education act (2015), which covers VET, increased the responsibility of local and regional authorities.

The reform increased their role in planning VET intake and defining occupations, funding staff salaries, organising vocational training for the unemployed, and equipping VET schools.

Employer organisations are also becoming more actively involved in implementing VET. Since the 2016 amendments to the VET act, they can propose changes to the list of VET qualifications.

Since the introduction in 2015/16, some schools have started offering dual VET programmes. Several pilot projects supporting dual training aim at expanding the training offer in cooperation with business and public authorities from Bulgaria and abroad. Measures, including specialised forums, media campaigns and events, help attract learners and motivate employers to become involved in dual VET that is still mostly project-based.

To address quality concerns, the Ministry of Education and Science is adopting the European quality assurance reference framework (EQAVET). The 2015 quality assurance regulation mandates VET providers for adult training to organise self-assessment based on a set of indicators.

The government is strengthening initial training and continuing professional development opportunities for VET teachers and trainers to motivate more young people to enter the profession. The new system helps them to keep up with technological innovation and modern teaching methods, and allows for faster career advancement linked to performance.

The 2015-17 VET strategy action plan proposes ways to address the challenges: modularisation, more flexible VET provision, and better and more easily accessible career guidance services. Its implementation is also likely to contribute to raising adult participation in learning, which is currently among the lowest in the EU.

There is a high level of skills mismatch. According to the NSI business inquiries in March 2019 37.0% of the industrial enterprises pointed out the labour shortages a factor limiting their activity. In comparison with the same period of previous year (March 2018) the value of the indicator increased by 4 p.p. to 33.3%.

Data from VET in Bulgaria Spotlight 2018 [4]Adapted from Cedefop (2018). Spotlight on vocational education and training in Bulgaria. Luxembourg: Publications Office. http://www.cedefop.europa.eu/files/8120_en.pdf

Population in 2018: 7 050 034 [5]NB: Data for population as of 1 January. Eurostat table tps00001 [extracted 28.1.2019

It decreased by 3.2% since 2013 due to negative natural growth and migration [6]NB: Data for population as of 1 January. Eurostat table tps00001 [extracted 16.5.2019].
.

As in many other EU countries, the population is ageing.

An old-age dependency ratio is expected to increase from 30 in 2015 to 63 in 2060.

Population forecast by age group and old-age-dependency ratio

Source: Eurostat, proj_15ndbims [extracted on 24.01.2019]

Demographic changes have an impact on vocational education and training (VET). Participation in secondary education has been decreasing. This has led to optimisation of a school network aiming at better efficiency while safeguarding the quality. Since the academic year 2013/14, the number of VET schools has decreased by 11.9% up to 2018/19. However the number of VET centres has increased by 12.4% for the same period. Adjustments will continue in line with demographic trends.

 

Main economic sectors:

  • manufacturing;
  • wholesale and retail trade;
  • construction;
  • public administration;
  • agriculture, forestry and fishing;
  • transportation and storage.

Export comprises mainly manufactured goods, machinery and transport equipment, miscellaneous manufactured articles, food and live animals, chemical and mineral fuel, beverages and tobacco.

Not many occupations/professions are regulated and the labour market is considered flexible.

Total unemployment [7]Percentage of active population, 25 to 74 years old.
(2018): 4.9% (6% in EU-28); it decreased by 0.1 percentage point since 2008 [8]Eurostat, une_rt_a [extracted 20.5.2019]. 
.

Unemployment rate (aged 15-24 and 25-64) by education attainment level in 2008-18

NB: Data based on ISCED 2011; breaks in time series; low reliability for ISCED 0-2 and 5-8, age 15-24.
ISCED 0-2 = less than primary, primary and lower secondary education.
ISCED 3-4 = upper secondary and post-secondary non-tertiary education.
ISCED 5-8 = tertiary education.
Source: Eurostat, lfsa_urgaed [extracted 16.5.2019].

Unemployment is distributed unevenly between those with low and high-level qualifications. The gap has increased after the crisis as unskilled workers are more vulnerable to unemployment. People with low qualifications are more likely to be unemployed. In 2018, the unemployment rate of people with medium-level qualifications, including most VET graduates (ISCED levels 3 and 4) is back to the levels of the pre-crisis years.

Employment rate of 20 to 34-year-old VET graduates increased from from 77.6% in 2014 to 84.6% in 2018.

Employment rate of VET graduates (20 to 34 years old, ISCED levels 3 and 4)

NB: Data based on ISCED 2011; breaks in time series.
ISCED 3-4 = upper secondary and post-secondary non-tertiary education.
Source: Eurostat, edat_lfse_24 [extracted 16.5.2019].

The increase (+7 pp) in employment of 20-34 year-old VET graduates is lower compared to the increase in employment of all 20-34 year-old graduates (+7.7 pp) in the same period in Bulgaria [9]NB: Data based on ISCED 2011; breaks in time series. ISCED 3-4 = upper secondary and post-secondary non-tertiary education; Eurostat, edat_lfse_24 [extracted 16.5.2019]. 
.

The share of the population aged up to 64 with higher education (28.2%) places Bulgaria below the EU28 average. The share of those with low or without qualifications places Bulgaria (17.4%) almost in the middle of EU-28 Member States.

Population (aged 25 to 64) by highest education level attained in 2018

NB: Data based on ISCED 2011. Low reliability for "No response" in Czechia, Iceland, Latvia, and Poland.
ISCED 0-2 = less than primary, primary and lower secondary education.
ISCED 3-4 = upper secondary and post-secondary non-tertiary education.
ISCED 5-8 = tertiary education.
Source: Eurostat, lfsa_pgaed [extracted 16.5.2019]

Share of learners in VET by level in 2017

lower secondary upper secondary post-secondary
3.7% 50.7% 100%

NB: Data based on ISCED 2011.

Source: Eurostat, educ_uoe_enrs01, educ_uoe_enrs04 and educ_uoe_enrs07 [extracted 16.5.2019].

Share of initial VET learners from total learners at upper-secondary level (ISCED level 3), 2017

NB: Data based on ISCED 2011.
Source: Eurostat, educ_uoe_enrs04 [extracted 16.5.2019]

Traditionally there are more females (53.2% for 2018) in VET [10]http://www.nsi.bg/en/content/4921/persons-who-attained-professional-qualification-level-vocational-training
. Females enrol more often in economics and administration programmes (the most popular options), services (tourism, hotels and restaurants) as well as design and clothing industry. Males prefer programmes related to computer systems and coding (the most popular options), transport, agriculture, economy, construction. 

The share of early leavers from education and training has decreased from 14.7% in 2009 to 12.7% in 2018. It is 2.1 pp above the EU-28 average and also above 11.0%, the national country target.

Early leavers from education and training in 2009-18

NB: Share of the population aged 18 to 24 with at most lower secondary education and not in further education or training; break in series.
Source: Eurostat, edat_lfse_14 [extracted 16.5.2019] and European Commission: https://ec.europa.eu/info/2018-european-semester-national-reform-programmes-and-stability-convergence-programmes_en [accessed 14.11.2018].

Dropout rate from VET (%)

 

Lifelong learning offers training opportunities for young people and adults.

Participation in lifelong learning in 2014-18

NB: Share of adult population aged 25 to 64 participating in education and training
Source: Eurostat, trng_lfse_01 [extracted 16.5.2019]

Participation in lifelong learning in Bulgaria has slightly increased in the past decade. However, it is well below the EU28 average (with 2.5% participation in lifelong learning in 2018). Increasing participation is one of the biggest challenges that the country faces.

Information not available

The education and training system comprises:

  • primary and lower secondary education (1, 2 and 3);
  • secondary education comprises general (profiled) (ISCED 344 and 341) and VET programmes (ISCED 351 and 354) in two subsequent stages: the first (3-year, grades 8-10) and the second (2-year, grades 11-12). It is compulsory for learners until they reach age 16. At the end of stage two, learners who pass State matriculation examinations (matura) (Bulgarian language in addition to another subject or – for VET learners – State qualification examination) receive a secondary education diploma (EQF level 4) and certificate for VET qualification after successful passing the State qualification examination. Others receive a certificate for the completion of secondary education with access to vocational training for adults but not to higher education. VET programmes provide graduates with general education diploma in addition to a VET qualification certificate;
  • post-secondary non-tertiary VET (ISCED level 4);
  • higher education (ISCED levels 6, 7 and 8);
  • apprenticeships, internships and dual VET (range of VET qualifications ranging from  ISCED 351 to 454).

Primary and lower secondary education (grades 1-7) is compulsory [11]Education is compulsory till the age of 16.  
. Primary education starts at age seven and is provided by State, municipal and private schools. There are no VET programmes at this level. Graduates may continue to general or vocational secondary education. In 2016/17, all general secondary education programmes became ‘profiled’, i.e. they specialise on a selected subject, for example, mathematics, natural sciences or foreign languages.

Secondary education comprises general (profiled) (ISCED 344 and 341) and VET programmes (ISCED 351 and 354) in two subsequent stages: the first (3-year, grades 8-10) and the second (2-year, grades 11-12). It is compulsory for learners until they reach age 16. At the end of stage two, learners who pass State matriculation examinations (matura) (Bulgarian language in addition to another subject or – for VET learners – State qualification examination) receive a secondary education diploma (EQF level 4) and certificate for VET qualification after successfully passing the State qualification examination. Others receive a certificate for the completion of secondary education with access to vocational training for adults but not to higher education. VET programmes provide graduates with a general education diploma in addition to a VET qualification certificate.

Higher education comprises the following programmes:

  • professional bachelor (ISCED 655, EQF level 6; NQF level 6a);
  • bachelor (ISCED 645, EQF level 6; NQF level 6b);
  • master’s (ISCED 766, 767, EQF/ NQF level 7);​
  • PhD (ISCED 864, EQF/ NQF level 8). 

School based VET is provided only at a secondary level. Until August 2016, the lowest level of qualification could also be acquired in lower secondary education programmes. Out-of-school adults (16+) can still acquire the lowest VET qualification level (VET qualification level 1, EQF level 2) before secondary education.

Secondary VET aims at obtaining a vocational qualification but also comprises a general education part that is required to acquire a secondary education diploma.
Vocational education and training complies with the requirements of the State educational standards and consists of theory and (study and production) practice.

Post-secondary, non-tertiary vocational qualifications (ISCED 2011 level 4, EQF level 5) can be acquired only by people with completed secondary education. The acquired qualification at this level provides access to the labour market.

Examples of such qualifications are company manager, hotel manager, restaurant manager as well as sports and military/defence qualifications.

Training in real work environment: apprenticeships, internships, dual VET

There are several types of training in real work environment.

In 1992, so-called apprenticeships for employees were introduced. They often guarantee a job at the end of training, according to the contract with the employer. The duration of this type of apprenticeships is up to six months.

In 2014, internships were introduced for young people (up to 29 years old) who have already acquired a VET qualification (or higher education degree) but have no work experience in the profession. The duration of internships is between six and 12 months.

Since 2014, dual VET has started to evolve. It allows learners to acquire VET qualifications. The practical training in a company alternates with periods of theoretical training in a school or another VET provider. In-company trainers (mentors) are responsible for the practical training.

For adult learners the following options are available in order to acquire a VET qualification:

  • 300 hours for EQF level 2;
  • 660 hours for EQF level 3;
  • 960 hours for EQF level 4;
  • 1 260 hours for EQF level 5.

The legal framework distinguishes six types of initial and continuing VET (IVET and CVET) programmes, defines age and entry requirements, and regulates content and duration.

There are several types of training in real work environment.

In 1992, so-called apprenticeships for employees were introduced. They often guarantee a job at the end of training, according to the contract with the employer. The duration of this type of apprenticeships is up to six months.

In 2014, internships were introduced for young people (up to 29 years old) who have already acquired a VET qualification (or higher education degree) but have no work experience in the profession. The duration of internships is between six and 12 months.

Since 2014, dual VET has started to evolve. It allows learners to acquire VET qualifications. The practical training in a company alternates with periods of theoretical training in a school or another VET provider. In-company trainers (mentors) are responsible for the practical training. They are required to have a VET or higher education qualification and at least three years of professional experience.

More information for Bulgaria is available at: http://www.cedefop.europa.eu/en/publications-and-resources/data-visualisations/apprenticeship-schemes/country-fiches/bulgaria

Learn more about  apprenticeships in the national context from the European database on apprenticeship schemes by Cedefop: http://www.cedefop.europa.eu/en/publications-and-resources/data-visualisations/apprenticeship-schemes/scheme-fiches

VET stakeholders are the following:

  • the National Assembly of the Republic of Bulgaria – implements the legislative activity in the field of VET;
  • the Council of Ministers sets out the government policy in the field of VET;
  • the education ministry manages, coordinates and implements the VET policy;
  • the labour ministry participates in the implementation of the national VET policy;
  • the culture ministry implements the VET policy in art schools;
  • the sports ministry implements the VET policy in sports schools;
  • the health ministry participates in the coordination of the list of professions;
  • the sectoral ministries are involved in the development, coordination and updating of the State educational standards for the acquisition of qualifications; in the development, coordination and updating of the list of professions; in coordinating the admission plan for schools, funded by them;
  • the employers’ representatives participate in the development, coordination and updating of the State educational standards for the acquisition of qualifications, the legislative framework and policy documents, as well as in the updating of the list of professions and in organising and conducting qualification examinations;
  • the Economic and Social Council discusses and makes proposals with regard to issues, related to education, including VET in the context of lifelong learning;
  • the National Council for Tripartite Cooperation discusses and gives opinions on draft legislation regarding employment and vocational qualification and thus participates in the formulation of VET policy. The Council is composed on the tripartite principle. It is a body for consultations and cooperation at a national level for labour, social insurance and living standard issues, consisting of two representatives of the government (of whom one is the Vice Prime Minister), two representatives of trade unions and two representatives of employers’ organisations;
  • the National Council for Vocational Qualifications at the labour ministry coordinates the development of national policies and strategies for training for unemployed and employees, leading to the acquisition of professional qualifications;
  • the National Council for the Promotion of Employment at the labour ministry is also constituted on the tripartite principle. Its functions are to discuss and give opinions regarding the development and implementation of the employment policy and the national action plan for employment.
  • the National Agency for Vocational Education and Training (NAVET) is a specialised body within the Council of Ministers. The Agency develops the State educational standards for the acquisition of VET qualifications; it maintains the list of professions according to the needs of the labour market; it licenses and exercises further control over the activities of VET institutions for people over 16 years of age and over the activities of vocational guidance providers;
  • the Employment Agency implements the State policy on promoting employment and provides career information, counselling and training for employees and unemployed;
  • the Human Resource Development Centre is a national agency, which coordinates the management and administration of the EU Erasmus+ Programme;
  • the National Inspectorate of Education is a new structure (2018). The Inspectorate does not exercise control over the activities of directors and teachers in schools and kindergartens. In fact, the inspection, performed by the inspectorate, is the process of preparing a comprehensive independent assessment of the quality of services provided by kindergarten or school education at some point of their Activities, based on criteria and indicators, grouped into fields.

At regional level:

  • the regional administration participates in the implementation of the government policy for employment and acquisition of VET qualifications;
  • the Regional Employment Service Directorates implement the government policy for training of unemployed and employed adults for acquiring a vocational qualification; they offer training measures and projects; provide coordination and support in the field of vocational training, consultancy of and guidance for the local employment offices;
  • the regional management units of the education ministry (territorial administrative units of the education ministry, situated in the 28 district centres) implement the State policy in the field of VET at a regional level through projects, programmes and strategies for development, functioning and improvement of VET at a district level;
  • the permanent and temporary employment committees to the Regional Councils for regional development identify, organise and control the implementation of the State policy on the promotion of employment and training for acquiring a vocational qualification at a regional level.

At local level:

  • the municipalities participate in the development of a VET policy within their territories regarding: the employment needs for vocational guidance and training of students, unemployed and other groups; the necessary equipment of schools, vocational training providers and centres for information and guidance through funds from the municipal budget;
  • the Labour Offices of the Employment Agency provide career services: career information; advice and guidance for inclusion in the appropriate program/measure for employment and training;
  • the Cooperation Councils at the Labour Office Directorates monitor the implementation of programmes and measures included in the national action plan for employment.

According to the VET Act, sources of financing for State and municipal schools, vocational training centres for information and vocational guidance and training centres for trainers are:

  • the State budget;
  • the municipal budget;
  • donations;
  • own revenue;
  • national and international programmes;
  • other sources.

Funding mechanism for secondary VET schools is based on financial resources delegated to schools per student and varies between EUR 1 000 and 1 500 per year per student depending on the specifics of the VET programmes delivered.

The financing of vocational training offered after secondary education is provided by individuals under the terms and conditions set by the education minister. The training is financed by:

  • learners;
  • employers;
  • the State budget (active labour market policy);
  • EU programmes (mainly ESF).

Secondary VET is mostly State-financed. Private VET schools may also apply for State funding. However, only 11 out of 350 VET schools were private in 2017/18. 

Most (over 90%) adult VET providers are private. They may also receive public financing. In 2016, self-financing of training courses by learners was the most common source (53.49%) followed by employer financing (29.14%) and funding through national or European public resources (16.83%).

In VET there are:

  • general subject teachers;
  • vocational subject teachers;
  • trainers who work in vocational centres;
  • mentors for training that takes place at enterprises.

The qualification requirements are set by the relevant legislation. Strategic documents also contain provisions for teachers and trainers.

The required qualification of teachers in general studies subjects is a Master's, Bachelor's or Specialist /Professional Bachelor (national qualifications framework level 6A, European qualifications framework level 6) higher education degree acquired in:

  • a specialty of a professional field corresponding to the relevant school subject with a professional qualification in teaching;
  • a specialty of another professional field and additional professional qualification in teaching in the relevant school subject.

There is no special training provided to teachers in general studies subjects in respect of their work at vocational schools, since the mandatory general education background for a certain educational level is the same for all types of schools in the country.

Teachers in a vocational training subject must hold a Master, Bachelor or Specialist higher education degree in:

  • specialties of vocational fields corresponding to the professions on the list of professions for vocational education and training taught at the relevant school and an additional professional qualification in teaching;
  • specialties of a professional field corresponding to the professions taught at the relevant school. This is applied in cases where specialists working in companies or prominent experts in the respective field are invited to participate in vocational training at VET institutions, with the aim to provide up to date specialised knowledge and improve the link with practice and increase the attractiveness of VET.

The required qualification of trainers at vocational training centres is laid down in the State educational requirements by professions in the ‘Requirements to trainers’. A trainer is required to be a university graduate with a Master or Bachelor educational degree in a specialty corresponding to the professional field out of the list of professions for vocational education and training wherein the profession to be taught has been classified. There is no requirement for additional pedagogical qualifications for trainers at vocational training centres.

The conditions for professional development of staff within the public education system (in-service training) and also the procedures for acquiring professional qualification levels are set by Regulation No 5 (1996) [12]Ordinance No 12, active as of 1.9.2016: https://www.mon.bg/upload/2333/naredba_12_01.09.2016_prof_razvitie_uchiteli.pdf
.

There are five professional qualification levels (highest being level one) and three types of teachers positions that depend on the experience and qualifications. These are: a teacher, a senior teacher and a head teacher- . The Ordinance No 12 (2016) sets the terms and conditions for acquisition of such position, the conditions for continuing teachers' qualification on the base of credit points. Training is provided by the approved training providers which are registered in the teachers training programmes informational system of the education ministry [13]http://iropk.mon.bg/

VET teacher's profession isn’t attractive in Bulgaria.
The decrease of VET teachers aged up to 34, the fact that the profession was amongst those with high demand (12 420 vacancies), together with the steady increase of the relative share of older VET teachers (aged 60+) poses a risk of staff shortage in the next 20 years.

The 2016 Ordinance No 12 [14]https://www.mon.bg/upload/2333/naredba_12_01.09.2016_prof_razvitie_uchiteli.pdf
 regulates the statute and the professional development of the teachers, school headmasters and pedagogical staff. According to the ordinance, teachers (including VET teachers) are required to improve their competences continuously.

Teachers receive a certificate for continuing training or specialisation credit points. Sixteen training hours (academic) equals to one credit point. At least three credit points in acquired in external programmes are compulsory for each period of appraisal in addition to one credit point per year acquired in the institution they work. The credit system ensures opportunities for accumulation, recognition and transfer of credits (for the forthcoming periods, or in case of change of school, in application for higher qualification level). Teachers, headmasters and other pedagogical staff now have to create and maintain their professional portfolio.

According to the State requirements (Ordinance 162/1997), the basic training of teachers (10 hours) is designed so as to include obligatory practical training, which is carried out through doing teacher observation (60 hours), ongoing teaching practice (60 hours) and an internship (100 hours).

The ongoing teaching practice relates to participation in the organisation of the educational process under the direct supervision of a teacher at the higher education institution. The internship for people who would like to work as teachers is carried out under the supervision of a mentoring secondary education teacher and a teacher at the higher education institution.

European funds have been used for continuing vocational training of teachers.

More information is available in the Cedefop ReferNet thematic perspective on teachers and trainers [15]http://www.cedefop.europa.eu/en/publications-and-resources/country-reports/teachers-and-trainers
.

The demand for qualifications is forecasted based on the macro-economic model (for medium and long-term forecasts) and the annual employer skill needs survey (for short-term forecasts).

The labour ministry is responsible for skills forecasting for medium and long term forecasts and the Employment Agency – for short term forecasts which are based on the employer skill needs survey provided twice in the year in accordance with the Employment Promotion Act.

Medium- and long-term forecasts take into account the demographic trends and changes in the educational attainment of the labour force and in the structure of the economy.

They provide information on labour demand and supply by:

  • level of education (basic, secondary or higher); 
  • economic activity;
  • profession;
  • structural shortage/surplus of labour by education level.

Since 2018, the Employment Committees of the Regional Development Councils biannually collect, process and submit to the Employment Agency information on the employers' demand for the labour force.

See also Cedefop’s skills forecast [16]http://www.cedefop.europa.eu/en/publications-and-resources/data-visualisations/skills-forecast
and European Skills Index [17]https://skillspanorama.cedefop.europa.eu/en/indicators/european-skills-index
.

VET qualifications are classified in the list of professions by education field, vocational area, occupation and specialty.

According to the Pre-school and School Education Act [18]https://www.mon.bg/bg/57
 and the VET Act [19]https://www.navet.government.bg/bg/media/ZPOO-2018-1.pdf
, the acquisition of vocational qualifications is regulated by the State educational standards. The national agency for VET designs the standards in coordination with the relevant ministries and departments, and the education minister endorses them. The standards are by occupation (profession).

State educational standards are developed in units of learning outcomes. They include:

  • requirements for the candidates – minimum entry level qualification and education requirements for pupils and adults;
  • option for validation of professional knowledge, skills and competences;
  • opportunities for continuing vocational training;
  • description of profession – with core working activities, responsibilities, job conditions specification, used equipment and tools, special requirements etc.
  • opportunities for professional development according to the national classification of professions and occupations;
  • units of learning outcomes for general, sectoral and specific vocational training– with defined knowledge, skills and expected competences;
  • defined assessment tools for theoretical and practical skills;
  • execution of the examination conditions;
  • assessment criteria;
  • requirements for training facilities;
  • requirements for trainers.

The approach for development of State educational standard in units of learning outcomes implements the principles of the European credit system for vocational education and training (ECVET) recommendation since 2016. The standards are mandatory for VET programmes leading to nationally recognised qualifications, also for adults.

In the beginning of 2019 NAVET’s methodology guidelines for development of State educational standards were revised. In addition of core development process there were included two more options:

  • collecting information for the profession from employers' organisations by online questionnaires
  • consultation with branch employers ( before the final acceptance), according to development or updating the standards

The up-to-date State educational standards are available for free use on the websites of the education ministry and the national agency for VET [20]http://www.mon.bg and http://www.navet.government.bg
.

Each time that the State educational standards are amended, vocational training centres are obliged to update the relevant training programmes and curricula.

The curricula are based on framework programmes [21]Framework programmes include: general provisions, including the regulatory basis, the aim and purpose of the programme; requirements: entry (age, medical, previous education and qualification level), career and education pathways, form(s) of training (day full time, evening, part-time,  individual, distance, dual, self-learning); curriculum; training module content (theoretical and practical); graduation requirements (State examinations for full qualifications and final examinations for partial qualifications).
 and on the State educational standards for VET.

The education ministry develops the compulsory part of the VET curricula for new professions or forms of learning in VET schools.

VET teachers and employers support designing the curricula.

School-specific curricula part is designed by VET providers for each programme in order to reflect the specificities of the local labour market.

Curricula for VET schools comprise a training schedule, subject distribution between general and vocational parts, graduation requirements, explanatory notes, etc. to ensure the achievement of the learning outcomes.

Vocational training centres develop their own training programmes that take account also of prior learning. These programmes are evaluated (licenced) by the national agency for VET.

Since 2018, in the amended VET Act, the requirement to update modules in VET curriculum once every five years was added.

The Pre-school and School Education Act (2015, in force since August 2016) and the VET Act (2014)) establish the process of quality management, including VET. The quality management is a continuous process of organisational development based on its analysis, planning, implementation and evaluation. The evaluation is performed through self-assessment and inspection. It aims at preparing the internal evaluation of the quality of provided education through operations, procedures and criteria set by schools. It is carried out under terms and conditions determined by the State educational standard for quality management in the institutions.

The process follows these steps:

  • establishing a working group;
  • defining activities, procedures, criteria, indicators and tools;
  • contacting learners, teachers and parents;
  • performing self-assessment and analysing the results that may lead to recommendations;
  • preparing and validating the report.

The inspection is a process of preparing an overall independent expert evaluation of the education quality in schools at a given moment and guidelines for improvement. At least one inspection should be carried out in each school every five years.

All VET providers have to introduce an internal system for quality assurance to meet the requirement of the standards.

This system comprises:

  • policy and goals for quality assurance;
  • quality management responsibilities;
  • rules for the system’s implementation;
  • annual schedule for self-assessment;
  • rules and procedures for measuring the quality achieved through self-assessment.

A significant role is given to the improvement of the working environment, learning outcomes, interaction with the local community stakeholders, social partners, employers' organisations and universities, and staff training. The education ministry supports and monitors the implementation of quality assurance in VET schools and the national agency for VET in vocational training centres.

In 2014, the validation of informal and non-formal learning outcomes was introduced by the amendments to the VET Act [22]https://www.mon.bg/bg/57
.

The validation of knowledge, skills and competences acquired in non-formal and informal learning is regulated by Ordinance No 2/2014 (in force since 1.1.2015) [23]https://www.mon.bg/bg/59
, approved by the minister of education and science.

VET providers organise the validation for professions and specialties that are included in the list of professions for VET [24]https://www.mon.bg/bg/100053
.

Introducing a new approach for the development of State educational standards, based on units of learning outcomes in 2015 [25]https://www.mon.bg/bg/100305
, made the validation process more transparent.

Applicants present the evidence for the learning outcomes they possess in order to acquire a full or partial qualification allowing their access to vocational training and/or to the labour market.

The methods for assessing the learning outcomes are essentially identical to those for assessing knowledge, skills and competences applied in formal education and training.

Two types of certificates can be issued as a result of the validation:

  • a certificate validating a full qualification. By means of examination it certifies that all units of learning outcomes defined in the State educational standard have been achieved;
  • a certificate validating a part of vocational qualification (partial qualification). It certifies through an examination that one or several units of learning outcomes included in the State educational standard have been achieved.

Holders of these certificates have the same rights as those who have attained corresponding certificates through the formal education system.

Validation procedures are monitored by the regional education authorities and national agency for VET.

They also consult and guide providers methodologically.

Validation procedures can be funded by beneficiaries (individuals), companies and projects.

Validation fee for individuals cannot exceed the actual expenditure incurred by a provider.

For more information about arrangements for the validation of non-formal and informal learning please visit Cedefop’s European database [26]https://cumulus.cedefop.europa.eu/files/vetelib/2016/2016_validate_BG.pdf
.

VET is attractive because after graduation learners receive both a diploma for secondary education (giving access to higher education) and a certificate for vocational qualification.

Allowances, grants, vouchers and travel subsidy

Secondary VET learners may receive grants:

  • performance scholarships are awarded to learners with high learning achievements;
  • social allowances support access to education and prevent early leaving from VET of disadvantaged learners, e.g. with special education needs or orphans.

The grants are offered on a monthly basis and vary between 5% and 15% from the minimal national salary.

Learners in dual VET receive monthly remuneration from the companies they are trained in based on their contract. In addition, secondary VET learners can participate in ESF projects for work-based learning where they can also receive an additional grant of EUR 150.

A person (employed or unemployed) may have only one training voucher for key competences and one for VET training during the implementation of the programme:

  • at EQF level 2 – EUR 300;
  • at EQF level 3 – EUR 600;
  • at EQF level 4 – EUR 900.

All secondary VET learners are entitled to receive discounts when using public transport, including trains and in-city public transport. The discount can be up to 60% and is decided by each municipality.

According to the VET Act, provision of training is free of value added tax for companies.

Financial support for offering dual VET

Employment Promotion Act foresees financial benefits for employers for creating training places (jobs) for the unemployed. State budget pays remuneration, social security and health insurance for apprentices for up to 36 months. It also covers the costs of the training institution that provides theoretical lessons to an apprentice and mentoring costs.

According to the VET Act the system of vocational education and training includes vocational guidance, vocational education and vocational training.

The institutions, which provide vocational guidance for students are structured on regional principle for 28 regions.

The responsible institution for licensing centres for information and vocational guidance for adults is NAVET.

Up to 31.12. 2018, 48 centres for information and vocational guidance for adults were licensed.

The regional employment service directorates, which are part of the employment agency, provide vocational guidance to the unemployed individuals and for those, who wish to change their current job.

The employment service directorates provide  vocational guidance services in the form of:

  • in person vocational consultation;
  • vocational consultation in groups.

The main goals of these services are to support individuals in making the right choice in terms of entering the labour market or choosing a suitable VET programme, the level of vocational qualification – initial or continuous and the options for acquiring the desired qualification.

Please see:

Vocational education and training system chart

Tertiary

Programme Types
Not available

Post-secondary

Click on a programme type to see more info
Programme Types

EQF 5

Post-secondary VET,

up to 2 years,

WBL: min. 50%,

FP: D (Г)

 

 ISCED 453

Initial/Continuing VET programmes leading to EQF level 5, ISCED 453 (РАМКОВА ПРОГРАМА Г за професионално обучение с придобиване на четвърта степен на професионална квалификация)
EQF level
5
ISCED-P 2011 level

453

Usual entry grade

12

Usual completion grade

12+

Usual entry age

18+

Usual completion age

18+

Length of a programme (years)

2

  
Is it part of compulsory education and training?

N

Is it part of formal education and training system?

Y

Is it initial VET?

Y

Is it continuing VET?

Y

Is it offered free of charge?

Y

For State owned schools

Is it available for adults?

Y

ECVET or other credits

Not applicable

Learning forms (e.g. dual, part-time, distance)
  • school-based learning (contact studies, including virtual communication with the teacher/trainer);
  • work practice (practical training at school and in-company practice);
  • apprenticeships.
Main providers
  • Schools
  • Enterprises
Share of work-based learning provided by schools and companies

<=70%

Work-based learning type (workshops at schools, in-company training / apprenticeships)
  • practical training at school
  • in-company practice
Main target groups

Programmes are available for people who have completed upper secondary education.

Entry requirements for learners (qualification/education level, age)

This type of VET is available only for people who have completed secondary education.

Assessment of learning outcomes

Learners need to pass a vocational qualification examination.

Diplomas/certificates provided

Graduates receive certificate for vocational qualification for EQF level 4 (Свидетелство за професионална квалификация - 4 СПК).

The learners may also ask to receive a Europass certificate supplement to the certificate.

The document is recognised by the labour market.

Examples of qualifications

Company manager, hotel manager, restaurant manager as well as sports and military/defence qualifications [43]As described in national context.
.

Progression opportunities for learners after graduation

Those who complete VET can enter the labour market.

Destination of graduates

Information not available

Awards through validation of prior learning

Y

According to Art. 40, para 1 of the VET Act, ‘Validation of professional knowledge, skills and competences is the identification and recognition of professional knowledge, skills and competences acquired through non-formal education or self-study and their compliance with the State educational requirements for acquiring qualification in professions’.

The validation procedure is carried out for professions and specialties included in the list of professions for vocational education and training under Art. 6 of the VET Act. The validation procedure starts with an application submitted by the person to the director of the institution entitled to carry out the validation. In order to prove the acquired professional knowledge, skills and competences declared for validation, the person shall submit copies of documents held by him/her together with the originals for reconciliation – workbook, service book, social security book, education diploma, attestations, references, certificates from previous professional trainings, artefacts, photos of artefacts, etc.

Validation procedure includes informing the person requesting validation about the purposes, validation procedures and their sequence, identifying the professional knowledge, skills and competences acquired by the person and recognition of a degree of professional qualification or of qualification for part of a profession.

General education subjects

Y

Key competences

Information not available

Application of learning outcomes approach

Y

Share of learners in this programme type compared with the total number of VET learners

Information not available

Secondary

Click on a programme type to see more info
Programme Types

EQF 2

Mainly school-based VET,

3 years,

WBL: min. 70%,

FP: A (A)

 

ISCED 351

Initial VET programmes leading to EQF level 2, ISCED 351 (Рамкова програма А за начално професионално обучение с придобиване на първа степен на професионална квалификация)
EQF level
2
ISCED-P 2011 level

351

Usual entry grade

8

Usual completion grade

10

Usual entry age

13

Usual completion age

16

Length of a programme (years)

2

  
Is it part of compulsory education and training?

Y

In Bulgaria education is mandatory till the age of 16.

Is it part of formal education and training system?

Y

Is it initial VET?

Y

Is it continuing VET?

N

This framework programme is only for initial VET.

Is it offered free of charge?

Y

For State owned schools

Is it available for adults?

Y

ECVET or other credits

Not applicable

Learning forms (e.g. dual, part-time, distance)
  • daily
  • evening
  • extramural
  • distance learning
  • work based training
  • individual
  • self-learning

The most common learning form is daily form.

Main providers
  • schools
  • schools in partnership with enterprises.
Share of work-based learning provided by schools and companies

>=70%

Work-based learning type (workshops at schools, in-company training / apprenticeships)
  • practical training at school – when the school uses its own base for practical training
  • in-company practice - when learners go to external companies for practical training
Main target groups

Programmes are available for young people and also for adults.

This VET programme is appropriate for those learners who wish an early entry to the labour market.

Entry requirements for learners (qualification/education level, age)

The requirements for enrolment in VET programmes are minimum age, health condition, previous education and qualification level.

The minimum required age is :

  • 13 (in the year of application) for vocational gymnasiums and schools;
  • 16 for vocational training centres.

The health condition of the applicant is certified by a medical certificate proving the fitness for the selected occupation.

Minimum entry requirements for VET learners:

  • for current learners - grade 6;
  • for newly enrolled learners (after 2016) -basic education, secondary education, stage 1, grade 7 for learners with special educational needs.

Minimum entry requirements for individuals above the age of 16:

  • for current learners: primary education or literacy course,  grade 7 for learners with special educational needs;
  • for newly enrolled learners (after 2016): primary education or literacy course, grade 7 for learners with special educational needs.
Assessment of learning outcomes

To complete this type of VET programme learners need to pass a State qualification examination: (for theory and practice of the occupation.

The education ministry develops and approves national examination programmes for the State qualification examinations. They include guidelines for content of the exam, task assignments and assessment criteria.

Diplomas/certificates provided

Graduates receive:

  • certificate for completed first stage of secondary education (Удостоверение за завършен първи гимназиален етап на средно образование);
  • certificate for vocational qualification for EQF level 2 (Свидетелство за професионална квалификация - 1 СПК). The learners  may also ask to receive a  Europass certificate supplement to the certificate;
  • competence certificate (Свидетелство за правоспособност) – if applicable for the particular qualification.

All these documents are recognised by the education system and by the labour market.

Examples of qualifications

Welder, turner, worker in the food industry [30]As described in national context
.

These three qualifications are included in the list of specialties from professions with expected shortage of specialists on the labour market, approved by the Council of Ministers in 2018.

Progression opportunities for learners after graduation

The graduates may continue their studies to the second stage of secondary education and VET qualification at EQF level 3 or 4, or can enter the labour market. However progression in either VET or general education is subject to different prerequisites, rather than completion of this VET programme.

Destination of graduates

Information not available

Awards through validation of prior learning

Y

According to Art. 40, para 1 of the VET Act, ‘Validation of professional knowledge, skills and competences is the identification and recognition of professional knowledge, skills and competences acquired through non-formal education or self-study and their compliance with the State educational requirements for acquiring qualification in professions’.

The validation procedure is carried out for professions and specialties included in the list of professions for vocational education and training under Art. 6 of the VET Act. The validation procedure starts with an application submitted by the person to the director of the institution entitled to carry out the validation. In order to prove the acquired professional knowledge, skills and competences declared for validation, the person shall submit copies of documents held by him/her together with the originals for reconciliation – workbook, service book, social security book, education diploma, attestations, references, certificates from previous professional trainings, artefacts, photos of artefacts, etc.

Validation procedure includes informing the person requesting validation about the purposes, validation procedures and their sequence, identifying the professional knowledge, skills and competences acquired by the person and recognition of a degree of professional qualification or of qualification for part of a profession.

General education subjects

Y

Key competences

Y

This type of VET programme includes modules for:

  • entrepreneurship;
  • foreign language and communication;​
  • ICT (digital competences).
Application of learning outcomes approach

Y

Share of learners in this programme type compared with the total number of VET learners

<=5% [31]2018/19. Share of learners compared to the total number of secondary VET learners.

EQF 3

Mainly school-based VET,

4 years, 

WBL: min. 60%,

FP: B (Б)

 

ISCED 351

Initial/Continuing VET programmes leading to EQF level 3, ISCED 351 (Рамкова програма Б за начално и продължаващо професионално обучение с придобиване на втора степен на професионална квалификация)
EQF level
3
ISCED-P 2011 level

351

Usual entry grade

8

Usual completion grade

11

Usual entry age

13 - Minimum age of the candidate in the year of application

Usual completion age

17

Length of a programme (years)

4

  
Is it part of compulsory education and training?

Y

In Bulgaria education till the age of 16 is mandatory.

Is it part of formal education and training system?

Y

Is it initial VET?

Y

Is it continuing VET?

Y

This framework programme is applicable for both IVET and CVET.

Is it offered free of charge?

Y

For State owned schools

Is it available for adults?

Y

It is available for adult learners who cover minimum entry requirements.

ECVET or other credits

Not applicable

Learning forms (e.g. dual, part-time, distance)
  • daily 
  • evening
  • extramural
  • distance learning
  • work based training
  • individual
  • self-learning

The most common learning form is daily form.

  • Apprenticeship is available after the age of 16 (grades 11-12).
Main providers
  • schools;
  • schools in partnership with enterprises.
Share of work-based learning provided by schools and companies

>=60%

Work-based learning type (workshops at schools, in-company training / apprenticeships)
  • practical training at school – when the school uses its premises for practical training
  • in-company practice – when learners go to external companies for practical training
Main target groups

This VET programme is appropriate for learners who wish to enter the labour market holding a recognised professional qualification and also for those who wish to continue their studies at EQF level 4.

Entry requirements for learners (qualification/education level, age)

The requirements for enrolment in VET programmes are minimum age, health condition, previous education and qualification level.

The minimum required age is 13 (in the year of application) for vocational gymnasiums and schools.

The health condition of the applicant is certified by a medical certificate proving the fitness for the selected occupation.

There is no limitation for maximum age.

Completed basic education is also a prerequisite for this type of programme for current learners.

Assessment of learning outcomes

Vocational education finishes with State qualification examinations: for theory and practice of the occupation.

The education ministry develops and approves national examination programmes for the State qualification examinations. They include guidelines for content of the exams, task assignments and assessment criteria.

Diplomas/certificates provided

Graduates receive:

  • certificate for vocational qualification for EQF level 3 (Свидетелство за професионална квалификация - 2 СПК). The learners may also ask to receive a Europass certificate supplement to the certificate;
  • competence certificate (Свидетелство за правоспособност) – if applicable for the particular qualification.

All these documents are recognised by the education system and by the labour market.

Examples of qualifications

Waiter, cook, hair dresser [32]As described in national context.
.

Progression opportunities for learners after graduation

The graduates may continue their studies at second stage of secondary education and VET qualification at EQF level 4, or can enter the labour market. However progression in either VET or general education is subject to different prerequisites, rather than completion of this VET programme.

Destination of graduates

Information not available

Awards through validation of prior learning

Y

According to Art. 40, para 1 of the VET Act, ‘Validation of professional knowledge, skills and competences is the identification and recognition of professional knowledge, skills and competences acquired through non-formal education or self-study and their compliance with the State educational requirements for acquiring qualification in professions’.

The validation procedure is carried out for professions and specialties included in the list of professions for vocational education and training under Art. 6 of the VET Act. The validation procedure starts with an application submitted by the person to the director of the institution entitled to carry out the validation. In order to prove the acquired professional knowledge, skills and competences declared for validation, the person shall submit copies of documents held by him/her together with the originals for reconciliation – workbook, service book, social security book, education diploma, attestations, references, certificates from previous professional trainings, artefacts, photos of artefacts, etc.

Validation procedure includes informing the person requesting validation about the purposes, validation procedures and their sequence, identifying the professional knowledge, skills and competences acquired by the person and recognition of a degree of professional qualification or of qualification for part of a profession.

General education subjects

Y

Key competences

Y

There are subjects for:

  • entrepreneurship;
  • foreign language and communication;​
  • ICT (digital competences).
Application of learning outcomes approach

Y

Share of learners in this programme type compared with the total number of VET learners

Information not available

EQF 3

Mainly school-based VET,

1 year,

WBL: min. 60%,

FP:B (Б)

 

ISCED 351

Initial/Continuing VET programmes leading to EQF level 3, ISCED 351 (РАМКОВА ПРОГРАМА Б за начално и продължаващо професионално обучение с придобиване на втора степен на професионална квалификация)
EQF level
3
ISCED-P 2011 level

351

Usual entry grade

11

Usual completion grade

12

Usual entry age

17

Usual completion age

17

Length of a programme (years)

1

  
Is it part of compulsory education and training?

Y

In Bulgaria education is mandatory till the age of 16.

Is it part of formal education and training system?

Y

It is part of formal education and training system.

Is it initial VET?

Y

Is it continuing VET?

Y

This framework programme is applicable for both IVET and CVET.

Is it offered free of charge?

Y

For State owned schools

Is it available for adults?

Y

ECVET or other credits

Not applicable

Learning forms (e.g. dual, part-time, distance)
  • daily
  • evening
  • extramural
  • distance learning
  • work based training
  • individual
  • self-learning

The most common learning form is daily form.

  • Apprenticeship is available after the age of 16 (grades 11-12).
Main providers
  • schools
  • schools in partnership with enterprises
  • vocational training centres
Share of work-based learning provided by schools and companies

>=60% - Min 60% - The share of practical training for these qualifications that require the performance of a complex set of activities (NQF/ EQF level 3) is no less than 60%.

Work-based learning type (workshops at schools, in-company training / apprenticeships)
  • practical training at school
  • in-company practice – when learners go to external companies for practical training
  • practical training at school – when the school uses its own premises for practical training
Main target groups

Programmes are available for individuals above the age 16.

Entry requirements for learners (qualification/education level, age)

The requirements for enrolment in VET programmes are minimum age, health condition, previous education and qualification level.

The minimum required age is 13 (in the year of application) for vocational gymnasiums and schools.

The health condition of the applicant is certified by a medical certificate proving the fitness for the selected occupation.

Previous education requirements are at least a completed grade or stage from the basic or secondary education, completed initial stage of the lower secondary education or a successfully completed literacy course under the Employment Promotion Act.

For the particular programme stage 1 of secondary education and VET qualification level 2 is a prerequisite for admission – for newly enrolled learners (after 2016).

Assessment of learning outcomes

Vocational education finishes with State qualification examination: The examination is both theoretical and practical and is relevant to the occupation.

The education ministry develops and approves national examination programmes for the State qualification examination. They include guidelines for content of the exams, task assignments and assessment criteria.

Diplomas/certificates provided

Graduates receive:

  • certificate for vocational qualification for EQF level 3 (Свидетелство за професионална квалификация - 2 СПК). The learners may also ask to receive a  Europass certificate supplement to the certificate;
  • competence certificate (Свидетелство за правоспособност) - if applicable for the particular qualification.

All these documents are recognised by the education system and by the labour market.

Examples of qualifications

Assistant trainer in sports, system programmer, tourist guide [33]As described in national context.
.

Progression opportunities for learners after graduation

The graduates may continue their studies to the second stage of secondary education and VET qualification at EQF level 4, or can enter the labour market. However progression in either VET or general education is subject to different prerequisites rather than the completion of this VET programme. 

Destination of graduates

Information not available

Awards through validation of prior learning

Y

According to Art. 40, para 1 of the VET Act, ‘Validation of professional knowledge, skills and competences is the identification and recognition of professional knowledge, skills and competences acquired through non-formal education or self-study and their compliance with the State educational requirements for acquiring qualification in professions’.

The validation procedure is carried out for professions and specialties included in the list of professions for vocational education and training under Art. 6 of the VET Act. The validation procedure starts with an application submitted by the person to the director of the institution entitled to carry out the validation. In order to prove the acquired professional knowledge, skills and competences declared for validation, the person shall submit copies of documents held by him/her together with the originals for reconciliation – workbook, service book, social security book, education diploma, attestations, references, certificates from previous professional trainings, artefacts, photos of artefacts, etc.

Validation procedure includes informing the person requesting validation about the purposes, validation procedures and their sequence, identifying the professional knowledge, skills and competences acquired by the person and recognition of a degree of professional qualification or of qualification for part of a profession.

General education subjects

Y

Key competences

Y

There are modules for:

  • entrepreneurship;
  • foreign language and communication;​
  • ICT (digital competences).
Application of learning outcomes approach

Y

Share of learners in this programme type compared with the total number of VET learners

Information not available

EQF 3

Mainly school-based VET,

5 years,

WBL: min. 60%,

FP: C (B)

 

ISCED 354

Initial/Continuing VET programmes leading to EQF level 3, ISCED 354 (РАМКОВА ПРОГРАМА В за професионално образование с придобиване на втора степен на професионална квалификация)
EQF level
3
ISCED-P 2011 level

354

Usual entry grade

8

Usual completion grade

12

Usual entry age

14

Usual completion age

18

Length of a programme (years)

5

  
Is it part of compulsory education and training?

Y

In Bulgaria education is mandatory till the age of 16.

Is it part of formal education and training system?

Y

Is it initial VET?

Y

Is it continuing VET?

Y

Is it offered free of charge?

Y

For State owned schools

Is it available for adults?

N

ECVET or other credits

Not applicable

Learning forms (e.g. dual, part-time, distance)
  • school-based learning (contact studies, including virtual communication with the teacher/trainer);
  • work practice (practical training at school and in-company practice);
  • apprenticeships after the age of 16 (grades 11-12).
Main providers

Schools

Share of work-based learning provided by schools and companies

>=60%

Work-based learning type (workshops at schools, in-company training / apprenticeships)
  • practical training at school
  • in-company practice
Main target groups

Programmes are available for young people.

Based on the type and school curriculum for students with sensory disabilities, special curricula are developed. Typical curricula for framework programmes C apply depending on the student's specific abilities to reach the learning outcomes that are included in the State Educational Standard for acquiring a qualification in the respective profession. For imprisoned learners vocational education is organised for the acquisition of the second degree of professional qualification (EQF 3) in the first and second stage of secondary education.

Entry requirements for learners (qualification/education level, age)

Learners must be at least 13 years old in order to apply.

Basic education is a prerequisite for admission at this VET programme.

Assessment of learning outcomes

To complete a VET programme learners need to pass a State matriculation examination in ‘Bulgarian language and literature’ and a State qualification examination.

Diplomas/certificates provided

Graduates receive:

  • diploma for secondary education (Диплома за средно образование);
  • certificate for vocational qualification for EQF level 3 (Свидетелство за професионална квалификация - 2 СПК). The learners may also ask to receive a  Europass certificate supplement to the certificate;
  • competence certificate (Свидетелство за правоспособност) - if applicable for the particular qualification.

All these documents are recognised by the education system and by the labour market.

Examples of qualifications

Electric fitter, cook, wood processing operator [34]As described in national context.
.

Progression opportunities for learners after graduation

The graduates may:

  • continue their studies at tertiary education;
  • continue their VET qualification at EQF Level 5;
  • enter the labour market.
Destination of graduates

Information not available

Awards through validation of prior learning

Y

According to Art. 40, para 1 of the VET Act, ‘Validation of professional knowledge, skills and competences is the identification and recognition of professional knowledge, skills and competences acquired through non-formal education or self-study and their compliance with the State educational requirements for acquiring qualification in professions’.

The validation procedure is carried out for professions and specialties included in the list of professions for vocational education and training under Art. 6 of the VET Act. The validation procedure starts with an application submitted by the person to the director of the institution entitled to carry out the validation. In order to prove the acquired professional knowledge, skills and competences declared for validation, the person shall submit copies of documents held by him/her together with the originals for reconciliation – workbook, service book, social security book, education diploma, attestations, references, certificates from previous professional trainings, artefacts, photos of artefacts, etc.

Validation procedure includes informing the person requesting validation about the purposes, validation procedures and their sequence, identifying the professional knowledge, skills and competences acquired by the person and recognition of a degree of professional qualification or of qualification for part of a profession.

General education subjects

Y

Key competences

Information not available

Application of learning outcomes approach

Y

Share of learners in this programme type compared with the total number of VET learners

=20% [35]2018/19. Share of learners compared with the total number of secondary VET learners.

EQF 4

Mainly school-based VET,

2 years,

WBL: min. 50%,

FP: C (B)

 

ISCED 354

Initial/Continuing VET programmes leading to EQF level 4, ISCED 354 (РАМКОВА ПРОГРАМА В за професионално образование с придобиване на трета степен на професионална квалификация)
EQF level
4
ISCED-P 2011 level

354

Usual entry grade

11

Usual completion grade

12

Usual entry age

17

Usual completion age

18

Length of a programme (years)

2

  
Is it part of compulsory education and training?

Y

In Bulgaria education is mandatory till the age of 16.

Is it part of formal education and training system?

Y

Is it initial VET?

Y

Is it continuing VET?

Y

Is it offered free of charge?

Y

For State owned schools

Is it available for adults?

N

ECVET or other credits

Not applicable

Learning forms (e.g. dual, part-time, distance)
  • school-based learning (contact studies, including virtual communication with the teacher/trainer);
  • work practice (practical training at school and in-company practice);
  • apprenticeships after the age of 16 (grades 11-12)
Main providers

Schools

Share of work-based learning provided by schools and companies

>=50%

Work-based learning type (workshops at schools, in-company training / apprenticeships)
  • practical training at school
  • in-company practice
Main target groups

Programmes are available for young people.

Based on the type and school curriculum for students with sensory disabilities, special curricula are developed. Typical curricula for framework programmes C apply depend on the learner's specific abilities to acquire the learning outcomes that are included in the State educational standard for acquiring a qualification in the respective profession. For imprisoned learners, vocational education is organised for the acquisition of the second degree of professional qualification (EQF 3) in the first and second stage of secondary education.

Entry requirements for learners (qualification/education level, age)

Learners must be at least 13 years old to apply.

Basic education is a prerequisite for admission to this VET programme.

For the particular VET programme completion of secondary education stage 1 and VET qualification level 2 are prerequisites for admission.

Assessment of learning outcomes

To complete this type of VET programme learners need to pass a State matriculation examination in ‘Bulgarian language and literature’ and a State qualification examination.

Diplomas/certificates provided

Graduates receive:

  • diploma for secondary education (Диплома за средно образование);
  • certificate for vocational qualification for EQF level 4 (Свидетелство за професионална квалификация - 3 СПК). The learners may also ask to receive a  Europass certificate supplement to the certificate;
  • competence certificate (Свидетелство за правоспособност) – if applicable for the particular qualification.

All these documents are recognised by the education system and by the labour market.

Examples of qualifications

Electro-technician, restaurant keeper, wood-procession technician-technologist [36]As described in national context 
.

Progression opportunities for learners after graduation

The graduates may:

- continue their studies at tertiary education;

- continue their VET qualification at EQF Level 5;

- enter the labour market.

Destination of graduates

Information not available

Awards through validation of prior learning

Y

General education subjects

Y

According to Art. 40, para 1 of the VET Act, ‘Validation of professional knowledge, skills and competences is the identification and recognition of professional knowledge, skills and competences acquired through non-formal education or self-study and their compliance with the State educational requirements for acquiring qualification in professions’.

The validation procedure is carried out for professions and specialties included in the list of professions for vocational education and training under Art. 6 of the VET Act. The validation procedure starts with an application submitted by the person to the director of the institution entitled to carry out the validation. In order to prove the acquired professional knowledge, skills and competences declared for validation, the person shall submit copies of documents held by him/her together with the originals for reconciliation – workbook, service book, social security book, education diploma, attestations, references, certificates from previous professional trainings, artefacts, photos of artefacts, etc.

Validation procedure includes informing the person requesting validation about the purposes, validation procedures and their sequence, identifying the professional knowledge, skills and competences acquired by the person and recognition of a degree of professional qualification or of qualification for part of a profession.

Key competences

Information not available

Application of learning outcomes approach

Y

Share of learners in this programme type compared with the total number of VET learners

Information not available

EQF 4

Mainly school-based VET,

5 years,

WBL: min. 50%,

FP: C (B)

 

ISCED 354

Initial/Continuing VET programmes leading to EQF level 4, ISCED 354 (РАМКОВА ПРОГРАМА В за професионално образование с придобиване на трета степен на професионална квалификация)
EQF level
4
ISCED-P 2011 level

354

Usual entry grade

8

Usual completion grade

12

Usual entry age

14

Usual completion age

18

Length of a programme (years)

5

  
Is it part of compulsory education and training?

Y

In Bulgaria education is mandatory till the age of 16.

Is it part of formal education and training system?

Y

Is it initial VET?

Y

Is it continuing VET?

Y

Is it offered free of charge?

Y

For State owned schools

Is it available for adults?

N

ECVET or other credits

Not applicable

Learning forms (e.g. dual, part-time, distance)
  • school-based learning (contact studies, including virtual communication with the teacher/trainer);
  • work practice (practical training at school and in-company practice);
  • apprenticeships after the age of 16 (grades 11-12)
Main providers

Schools

Share of work-based learning provided by schools and companies

>=50%

Work-based learning type (workshops at schools, in-company training / apprenticeships)
  • practical training at school
  • in-company practice
Main target groups

Programmes are available for young people.

Based on the type and school curriculum for learners with sensory disabilities, special curricula are developed. Typical curricula for framework programmes C apply depending on the student's specific abilities to acquire the learning outcomes that are included in the State educational standard for acquiring a qualification in the respective profession. For imprisoned learners vocational education is organised for the acquisition of the third degree of professional qualification (EQF 4) in the first and second stage of secondary education.

Entry requirements for learners (qualification/education level, age)

Learners must be at least 13 years old (when they apply) to enrol.

For this type of VET programme the completion of basic education is a prerequisite for admission.

Assessment of learning outcomes

The secondary VET is completed with State matriculation examinations in ‘Bulgarian language and literature’ and a State qualification examination.

Diplomas/certificates provided

Graduates receive:

  • diploma for secondary education (Диплома за средно образование);
  • certificate for vocational qualification for EQF level 4 (Свидетелство за професионална квалификация - 3 СПК). The learners  may also ask to receive a  Europass certificate supplement to the certificate;
  • competence certificate (Свидетелство за правоспособност) – if applicable for the particular qualification.

All these documents are recognised by the education system and by the labour market.

Examples of qualifications

Electro-technician, restaurant keeper, wood-procession technician-technologist [37]As described in national context 
.

Progression opportunities for learners after graduation

The graduates may:

  • continue their studies at tertiary education;
  • continue their VET qualification at EQF Level 5;
  • enter the labour market.
Destination of graduates

Information not available

Awards through validation of prior learning

Y

According to Art. 40, para 1 of the VET Act, ‘Validation of professional knowledge, skills and competences is the identification and recognition of professional knowledge, skills and competences acquired through non-formal education or self-study and their compliance with the State educational requirements for acquiring qualification in professions’.

The validation procedure is carried out for professions and specialties included in the list of professions for vocational education and training under Art. 6 of the VET Act. The validation procedure starts with an application submitted by the person to the director of the institution entitled to carry out the validation. In order to prove the acquired professional knowledge, skills and competences declared for validation, the person shall submit copies of documents held by him/her together with the originals for reconciliation – workbook, service book, social security book, education diploma, attestations, references, certificates from previous professional trainings, artefacts, photos of artefacts, etc.

Validation procedure includes informing the person requesting validation about the purposes, validation procedures and their sequence, identifying the professional knowledge, skills and competences acquired by the person and recognition of a degree of professional qualification or of qualification for part of a profession.

General education subjects

Y

Key competences

Information not available

Application of learning outcomes approach

Y

Share of learners in this programme type compared with the total number of VET learners

>=75% [38]2018/19. Share of learners compared to the total number of secondary VET learners.

EQF 4

Mainly school-based VET,

1 year,

WBL: min. 50%,

FP: C (B)

 

ISCED 354

Initial VET programmes leading to EQF level 4, ISCED 354 (РАМКОВА ПРОГРАМА В за професионално образование с придобиване на трета степен на професионална квалификация)
EQF level
4
ISCED-P 2011 level

354

Usual entry grade

12

Usual completion grade

12

Usual entry age

17

Usual completion age

18

Length of a programme (years)

1

  
Is it part of compulsory education and training?

Information not available

Is it part of formal education and training system?

Y

Is it initial VET?

Y

Is it continuing VET?

Information not available

Is it offered free of charge?

Y

For State owned schools

Is it available for adults?

Y

ECVET or other credits

Not applicable

Learning forms (e.g. dual, part-time, distance)
  • school-based learning (contact studies, including virtual communication with the teacher/trainer);
  • work practice (practical training at school and in-company practice);
  • apprenticeships after the age of 16 (grades 11-12).
Main providers
  • schools
  • enterprises 
Share of work-based learning provided by schools and companies

<=70%

Work-based learning type (workshops at schools, in-company training / apprenticeships)
  • practical training at school
  • in-company practice
Main target groups

Programmes are available for young people and also for adults.

Entry requirements for learners (qualification/education level, age)

The requirements for enrolment in VET programmes are minimum age, health condition, previous education and qualification level.

The minimum required age is 13 (in the year of application) for vocational gymnasiums and schools and 16 for vocational training centres (initial and continuous VET providers for employees and unemployed, without acquisition of an education level). The health condition of the applicant is certified by a medical certificate proving the fitness for the selected occupation. Previous education requirements are at least a completed grade or stage from the basic or secondary education, completed initial stage of the lower secondary education or a successfully completed literacy course under the Employment Promotion Act.

For the particular VET programme completion of grade 11 and VET qualification level 2 or 3 are prerequisites for admission.

Assessment of learning outcomes

To complete the program learners need to pass a matriculation exam and a State qualification examination.

Diplomas/certificates provided

Graduates receive:

  • diploma for secondary education (Диплома за средно образование);
  • certificate for vocational qualification for EQF level 4 (Свидетелство за професионална квалификация - 3 СПК). The learners may also ask to receive a Europass certificate supplement to the certificate;
  • competence certificate (Свидетелство за правоспособност) - if applicable for the particular qualification.

All these documents are recognised by the education system and by the labour market.

Examples of qualifications

Builder, electro technician, electronic equipment technician, cook, waiter, assistant trainer in sports and system programmer [39]As described in national context 
.

Progression opportunities for learners after graduation

The graduates may:

  • continue their studies at tertiary education;
  • continue their VET qualification at EQF Level 5;
  • enter the labour market.
Destination of graduates

Information not available

Awards through validation of prior learning

Y

According to Art. 40, para 1 of the VET Act, ‘Validation of professional knowledge, skills and competences is the identification and recognition of professional knowledge, skills and competences acquired through non-formal education or self-study and their compliance with the State educational requirements for acquiring qualification in professions’.

The validation procedure is carried out for professions and specialties included in the list of professions for vocational education and training under Art. 6 of the VET Act. The validation procedure starts with an application submitted by the person to the director of the institution entitled to carry out the validation. In order to prove the acquired professional knowledge, skills and competences declared for validation, the person shall submit copies of documents held by him/her together with the originals for reconciliation – workbook, service book, social security book, education diploma, attestations, references, certificates from previous professional trainings, artefacts, photos of artefacts, etc.

Validation procedure includes informing the person requesting validation about the purposes, validation procedures and their sequence, identifying the professional knowledge, skills and competences acquired by the person and recognition of a degree of professional qualification or of qualification for part of a profession.

General education subjects

Y

Key competences

Information not available

Application of learning outcomes approach

Y

Share of learners in this programme type compared with the total number of VET learners

Information not available

EQF 2

Mainly school-based VET,

1 year,

WBL: min. 70%,

FP: A (A)

 

ISCED 351

Initial VET programmes leading to EQF level 2, ISCED 351 (РАМКОВА ПРОГРАМА А за начално професионално обучение с придобиване на първа степен на професионална квалификация)
EQF level
2
ISCED-P 2011 level

351

Usual entry grade

11

Usual completion grade

11

Usual entry age

16

Usual completion age

17

Length of a programme (years)

1

  
Is it part of compulsory education and training?

N

Is it part of formal education and training system?

Y

Is it initial VET?

Y

Is it continuing VET?

N

Is it offered free of charge?

Y

For State owned schools

Is it available for adults?

Y

ECVET or other credits

Not applicable

Learning forms (e.g. dual, part-time, distance)
  • school-based learning (contact studies, including virtual communication with the teacher/trainer);
  • work practice (practical training at school and in-company practice);
  • apprenticeships after the age of 16 (grades 11-12).
Main providers
  • schools
  • enterprises 
Share of work-based learning provided by schools and companies

>=70%

Work-based learning type (workshops at schools, in-company training / apprenticeships)
  • practical training at school
  • in-company practice
Main target groups

Programmes are available for young people and also for adults.

Entry requirements for learners (qualification/education level, age)

The requirements for enrolment in VET programmes are minimum age, health condition, previous education and qualification level.

The minimum required age is 13 (in the year of application) for vocational gymnasiums and schools and 16 for vocational training centres (initial and continuous VET providers for employees and unemployed, without acquisition of an education level). The health condition of the applicant is certified by a medical certificate proving the fitness for the selected occupation. Previous education requirements are at least a completed grade or stage from the basic or secondary education, completed initial stage of the lower secondary education or a successfully completed literacy course under the Employment Promotion Act.

For this type of programme the completion of secondary education, stage 1 is a prerequisite for admission.

Assessment of learning outcomes

Information not available

Diplomas/certificates provided

Graduates receive:

  • certificate for vocational qualification for EQF level 2 (Свидетелство за професионална квалификация - 1 СПК). The students may also ask for receiving Europass certificate supplement to the certificate;
  • competence certificate (Свидетелство за правоспособност) – if applicable for the particular qualification.

All these documents are recognised by the education system and by the labour market.

Examples of qualifications

Builder, electro technician, electronic equipment technician, cook, waiter, assistant trainer in sports and system programmer [40]As described in national context 
.

Progression opportunities for learners after graduation

Those who complete VET can enter the labour market or continue their studies at EQF level 3 (VET) or in general education stage 2. However, progression in either VET or general education is subject to different prerequisites rather than the completion of this VET programme.

Destination of graduates

Information not available

Awards through validation of prior learning

Y

According to Art. 40, para 1 of the VET Act, ‘Validation of professional knowledge, skills and competences is the identification and recognition of professional knowledge, skills and competences acquired through non-formal education or self-study and their compliance with the State educational requirements for acquiring qualification in professions’.

The validation procedure is carried out for professions and specialties included in the list of professions for vocational education and training under Art. 6 of the VET Act. The validation procedure starts with an application submitted by the person to the director of the institution entitled to carry out the validation. In order to prove the acquired professional knowledge, skills and competences declared for validation, the person shall submit copies of documents held by him/her together with the originals for reconciliation – workbook, service book, social security book, education diploma, attestations, references, certificates from previous professional trainings, artefacts, photos of artefacts, etc.

Validation procedure includes informing the person requesting validation about the purposes, validation procedures and their sequence, identifying the professional knowledge, skills and competences acquired by the person and recognition of a degree of professional qualification or of qualification for part of a profession.

General education subjects

Y

Key competences

Information not available

Application of learning outcomes approach

Y

Share of learners in this programme type compared with the total number of VET learners

Information not available

EQF 3

Mainly school-based VET,

1 year,

WBL: min. 60%,

FP: C (B)

 

ISCED 354

Initial/Continuing VET programmes leading to EQF level 3, ISCED 354 (РАМКОВА ПРОГРАМА В за професионално образование с придобиване на втора степен на професионална квалификация)
EQF level
3
ISCED-P 2011 level

354

Usual entry grade

11

Usual completion grade

11

Usual entry age

17

Usual completion age

18

Length of a programme (years)

1

  
Is it part of compulsory education and training?

N

Is it part of formal education and training system?

Y

Is it initial VET?

Y

Is it continuing VET?

Y

Is it offered free of charge?

Y

For State owned schools

Is it available for adults?

Y

ECVET or other credits

Not applicable

Learning forms (e.g. dual, part-time, distance)
  • school-based learning (contact studies, including virtual communication with the teacher/trainer);
  • work practice (practical training at school and in-company practice);
  • apprenticeships after the age of 16 (grades 11-12).
Main providers
  • schools
  • enterprises
Share of work-based learning provided by schools and companies

>=60%

Work-based learning type (workshops at schools, in-company training / apprenticeships)
  • practical training at school
  • in-company practice
Main target groups

Programmes are available for young people and also for adults.

Entry requirements for learners (qualification/education level, age)

The requirements for enrolment in VET programmes are minimum age, health condition, previous education and qualification level.

The minimum required age is 13 (in the year of application) for vocational gymnasiums and schools and 16 for vocational training centres (initial and continuous VET providers for employees and unemployed, without acquisition of an education level). The health condition of the applicant is certified by a medical certificate proving the fitness for the selected occupation. Previous education requirements are at least a completed grade or stage from the basic or secondary education, completed initial stage of the lower secondary education or a successfully completed literacy course under the Employment Promotion Act.

For this type of VET programme completion of upper secondary stage 1 and VET qualification level 2 are prerequisites for admission.

Assessment of learning outcomes

To complete this type of VET programme learners need to pass a State matriculation examination and a State qualification examination.

Diplomas/certificates provided

Graduates receive:

  • diploma for secondary education (Диплома за средно образование);
  • certificate for vocational qualification for EQF level 3 (Свидетелство за професионална квалификация - 2 СПК). The learners may also ask to receive a Europass certificate supplement to the certificate;
  • competence certificate (Свидетелство за правоспособност) - if applicable for the particular qualification.

All these documents are recognised by the education system and by the labour market.

Examples of qualifications

Builder, electro technician, electronic equipment technician, cook, waiter, assistant trainer in sports and system programme [41]As described in national context.
.

Progression opportunities for learners after graduation

The graduates may:

  • continue their studies at tertiary education;
  • continue their VET qualification at EQF Level 5;
  • enter the labour market.
Destination of graduates

Information not available

Awards through validation of prior learning

Y

According to Art. 40, para 1 of the VET Act, ‘Validation of professional knowledge, skills and competences is the identification and recognition of professional knowledge, skills and competences acquired through non-formal education or self-study and their compliance with the State educational requirements for acquiring qualification in professions’.

The validation procedure is carried out for professions and specialties included in the list of professions for vocational education and training under Art. 6 of the VET Act. The validation procedure starts with an application submitted by the person to the director of the institution entitled to carry out the validation. In order to prove the acquired professional knowledge, skills and competences declared for validation, the person shall submit copies of documents held by him/her together with the originals for reconciliation – workbook, service book, social security book, education diploma, attestations, references, certificates from previous professional trainings, artefacts, photos of artefacts, etc.

Validation procedure includes informing the person requesting validation about the purposes, validation procedures and their sequence, identifying the professional knowledge, skills and competences acquired by the person and recognition of a degree of professional qualification or of qualification for part of a profession.

General education subjects

Y

Key competences

Information not available

Application of learning outcomes approach

Y

Share of learners in this programme type compared with the total number of VET learners

Information not available

EQF 3

Mainly school-based VET,

2 years,

WBL: min. 60%,

FP: C (B)

 

ISCED 354

Initial/continuing VET programmes leading to EQF level 3, ISCED 354 (РАМКОВА ПРОГРАМА В за професионално образование с придобиване на втора степен на професионална квалификация)
EQF level
3
ISCED-P 2011 level

354

Usual entry grade

11

Usual completion grade

12

Usual entry age

16

Usual completion age

18

Length of a programme (years)

2

  
Is it part of compulsory education and training?

N

Is it part of formal education and training system?

Y

Is it initial VET?

Y

Is it continuing VET?

Y

Is it offered free of charge?

Y

For State owned schools

Is it available for adults?

Y

ECVET or other credits

Not applicable

Learning forms (e.g. dual, part-time, distance)
  • school-based learning (contact studies, including virtual communication with the teacher/trainer);
  • work practice (practical training at school and in-company practice);
  • apprenticeships  for ages after 16 (grades 11-12).
Main providers
  • schools
  • enterprises
Share of work-based learning provided by schools and companies

<=70%

Work-based learning type (workshops at schools, in-company training / apprenticeships)
  • practical training at school
  • in-company practice
Main target groups

Programmes are available for young people and also for adults.

Entry requirements for learners (qualification/education level, age)

The requirements for enrolment in VET programmes are minimum age, health condition, previous education and qualification level.

The minimum required age is 13 (in the year of application) for vocational gymnasiums and schools and 16 for vocational training centres (initial and continuous VET providers for employees and unemployed, without acquisition of an education level). The health condition of the applicant is certified by a medical certificate proving the fitness for the selected occupation. Previous education requirements are at least a completed grade or stage from the basic or secondary education, completed initial stage of the lower secondary education or a successfully completed literacy course under the Employment Promotion Act.

For this type of VET programme completion of grade 11 and VET qualification level 2 or 3 are prerequisites for admission.

Assessment of learning outcomes

To complete this type of VET programme learners need to pass a matriculation examination and a State qualification examination.

Diplomas/certificates provided

Graduates receive:

  • diploma for secondary education (Диплома за средно образование);
  • certificate for vocational qualification for EQF level 3 (Свидетелство за професионална квалификация - 2 СПК). The learners may also ask to receive a  Europass certificate supplement to the certificate;
  • competence certificate (Свидетелство за правоспособност) – if applicable for the particular qualification.

All these documents are recognised by the education system (for continuation of the education) and by the labour market.

Examples of qualifications

Builder, electro technician, electronic equipment technician, cook, waiter, assistant trainer in sports and system programmer [42]As described in national context.
.

Progression opportunities for learners after graduation

The graduates may:

  • continue their studies at tertiary education;
  • continue their VET qualification at EQF Level 5;
  • enter the labour market.
Destination of graduates

Information not available

Awards through validation of prior learning

Y

According to Art. 40, para 1 of the VET Act, ‘Validation of professional knowledge, skills and competences is the identification and recognition of professional knowledge, skills and competences acquired through non-formal education or self-study and their compliance with the State educational requirements for acquiring qualification in professions’.

The validation procedure is carried out for professions and specialties included in the list of professions for vocational education and training under Art. 6 of the VET Act. The validation procedure starts with an application submitted by the person to the director of the institution entitled to carry out the validation. In order to prove the acquired professional knowledge, skills and competences declared for validation, the person shall submit copies of documents held by him/her together with the originals for reconciliation – workbook, service book, social security book, education diploma, attestations, references, certificates from previous professional trainings, artefacts, photos of artefacts, etc.

Validation procedure includes informing the person requesting validation about the purposes, validation procedures and their sequence, identifying the professional knowledge, skills and competences acquired by the person and recognition of a degree of professional qualification or of qualification for part of a profession.

General education subjects

Y

Key competences

Information not available

Application of learning outcomes approach

Y

Share of learners in this programme type compared with the total number of VET learners

Information not available

VET available to adults (formal and non-formal)

Programme Types
Not available