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Policy instruments

Scroll down to explore detailed information on skills anticipation and matching policy instruments from EU countries. Click on the respective tabs to select and filter by specific search criteria, such as the focus of the policy area, the aim of the instrument, the specific use of labour market intelligence and the type of stakeholders involved.

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Displaying 6 policy instruments
Title Country Focus area Policy area Aim of policy instrument Use of labour market intelligence Policy goal
Development of OSKA, a system of labour market monitoring and future skills forecasting EE Matching skills for the future of work Employment policy Upskill and match skills of unemployedAddress skill shortagesUpskill employed adultsMatch skills of young graduatesFacilitate job/career transitionsBroadly address skill mismatch Design training programmes to activate unemployedInform job-search decisions of unemployedInform decisions on course funding/provisionInform career-making decisions of studentsEnable strategic business decisionsInform and train career guidance and counsellorsInform the design of national qualification frameworks (NQFs)Design standards and accreditation

The policy instrument comprehensively addresses the issue of better matching the needs of the labour market with the provided education and training. The policy goal is to improve and tighten the linkages between the world of learning and the quantitative and qualitative needs and expectations of the labour market. The rationale for the intervention is the creation and implementation of a systematic process to engage all relevant stakeholders, so that they can provide input into skills anticipation and give recommendations to upgrade competency standards, provide relevant training and courses, also retraining possibilities. The general aim of OSKA is to teach and learn about the right skills relevant in the society. The OSKA system creates a cooperation platform, which enables the exchange of information between employers and training providers and educational institutions to comprehensively analyse the growth potential of different economic sectors and their needs, and to facilitate the planning of education provision at different levels of education and by types of school, as well as in the fields of retraining and in-service training.

Labour Market Square FI Matching skills for today’s job market Employment policy Match skills of young graduatesUpskill and match skills of unemployedFacilitate job/career transitions Other

The policy goal is to make it faster and easier to match job seekers to open jobs and increase productivity of employment services. It should also help educational institutions to plan their curriculum better to meet the needs of the labour market. Employment services have the role of matching unemployed people to open vacancies. The rationale is to use digital tools to increase the effectiveness, so that each job seeker gets improved job offers that better match their qualifications. A common problem has been that: unemployed people are frequently sent job offers that don't match their qualifications; and employers complain that reading application from unqualified persons is waste of their time. The Labour Market Square may (it has not yet been decided) have a control function to track if the unemployed are making genuine applications.

Research of qualification and labour markets - Employment Observatory LU Matching skills for today’s job market Employment policy Broadly address skill mismatch Other

The goal is to provide LMSI and analysis for all interested parties. It aims to produce studies from existing data, in order to improve the overall knowledge base of the labour market situation. The RETEL regularly publishes a dashboard for the labour market. It also organises annual conferences related to the labour market and employment in Luxemburg.

National Project: Forecasting of Developments of Labour Market Needs SK Matching skills for today’s job marketMatching skills for the future of work Employment policy Upskill and match skills of unemployedAddress skill shortagesUpskill employed adultsMatch skills of young graduatesBroadly address skill mismatch Design training programmes to activate unemployedInform job-search decisions of unemployedInform decisions on course funding/provisionInform career-making decisions of studentsInform the design of national qualification frameworks (NQFs)Other

The instrument aims to address skill mismatch in the economy. The project implements statistical models as tools for systematic monitoring of labour market needs, developments in skills mismatch, and skills supply/demand ratios at regional level, as well as with respect to graduates.

Online Guide to the Labour Market / Labour Market Integrated System SK Matching skills for today’s job market Employment policy Broadly address skill mismatchOther Inform and train career guidance and counsellorsInform career-making decisions of studentsInform job-search decisions of unemployed

The policy goal of ISTP is to bring together the concept of skill-oriented guidance for the unemployed and a database of vacant jobs organised according to a standardised classification of occupations. This framework is meant to provide a job seeker with a personal skills profile that can be matched with skills and competences required for specific work positions and with actual job offers. The instrument (online guide) offers jobseekers information and counselling that is useful for finding a job that corresponds to educational attainment, experience, knowledge and skills of the user. It also presents job vacancies that can be searched and allow creating personal profile visible to employers. Employers can publish vacancies and search job candidates.

The Matching map SE Matching skills for today’s job marketMatching skills for the future of work Employment policy Upskill and match skills of unemployedUpskill employed adultsMatch skills of young graduatesBroadly address skill mismatch Other

The goal is to enable detailed, grounded and complex analysis on skills match on the labour market. The extensive work that lies behind the Matching map is made in an attempt to develop the method for measuring skills match, taking it beyond direct comparisons between the classification of educations and the classification of occupations.

Assessing the skills match through directly comparing an individual’s educational level or field with his/hers occupational level/field, risk (at least in Sweden) to lead to misleading conclusions. One common reason for this is that many occupations in practice allow or require a different educational level than the stated, for example through changes in the educational system or in the employers demand. Another reason is that many occupations, such as analyst or private instructor, cannot be deduced to one single field of education.

The objective with the Matching map is therefore to provide policy makers, employers, labour market analysts etc. with better statistics on skills match, in relation to a wide range of policy areas.