You are here

Mobility scoreboard database

Country fiches provide detailed country-specific information and policy suggestions relating to IVET mobility for each of the 30 countries (EU Member States, Iceland, Norway) covered. The topics addressed in the fiches are as follows:

  • IVET level(s) covered in the fiche
  • Main schemes for international IVET mobility
  • Overview on the general governance of the IVET mobility policy
  • Overall targets in IVET mobility policy
  • Overall coordination of IVET mobility policy
  • Overall evaluation of the IVET mobility policy

Part 1. Information and guidance on international learning mobility for IVET

  • 1.1. Description of country structures and policy interventions
  • 1.1.1. Mechanism(s) to provide IVET learners with information and guidance on international learning mobility
  • 1.1.2. Countrywide coordination of information and guidance provision
  • 1.1.3. Policy targets in the thematic area of information and guidance
  • 1.1.4. Do legal provisions specifically include the objective of promoting international learning mobility in IVET?
  • 1.1.5. Actions for improving the provision of information and guidance on international learning mobility for IVET learners
  • 1.1.6. Evaluation of the actions for improving the provision of information and guidance
  • 1.1.7. Provision of information and assistance on IVET international mobility to companies and IVET institutions
  • 1.2. Analysis of country situation with respect to the criteria of the indicator for the “Information and guidance” area

Part 2. Administrative and institutional issues

  • 2.1. Description of country structures and policy interventions
  • 2.1.1. Existence of a policy orientation to encourage and support international learning mobility of IVET learners
  • 2.1.1.1. Integration of international learning mobility experiences in the curricula of IVET programmes
  • 2.1.1.2. Policy targets in the thematic area of removing administrative and institutional obstacles
  • 2.1.2. Measures to facilitate learning mobility in IVET
  • 2.1.2.1. Measures to smooth the delivery of visas and residency permits to IVET learners from third countries
  • 2.1.2.2. Measures to reduce administrative burdens that may hinder the international mobility of learners
  • 2.1.2.3. Measures to remove the legal obstacles to the international mobility of minor IVET learners
  • 2.1.2.4. Social and labour protection of apprentices and IVET students involved in international learning mobility
  • 2.1.3. Coordination and evaluation
  • 2.1.3.1. Coordination of the measures targeted at removing the administrative and institutional obstacles
  • 2.1.3.2. Evaluation of the measures targeted at removing the administrative and institutional obstacles
  • 2.2. Analysis of country situation with respect to the criteria of the indicator for the “Adm. and institutional issues” area

Part 3. Recognition of learning outcomes

  • 3.1. Description of country structures and policy interventions
  • 3.1.1. General approach to the recognition of learning acquired abroad by IVET learners
  • 3.1.1.1. Regulation by law or case by case treatment?
  • 3.1.1.2. Ease of access to recognition of learning acquired abroad by IVET learners
  • 3.1.2. Policy targets in thematic area of recognition
  • 3.1.3. Scope of recognition
  • 3.1.4. Countrywide coordination of the recognition approach
  • 3.1.5. Time limit for the recognition process
  • 3.1.6. Visibility of contact points for information on recognition
  • 3.1.6.1. Actions to establish, or make more visible, contact points for information on recognition
  • 3.1.6.2. Evaluation of the visibility policy
  • 3.1.7. Use of EU tools for visibility, transfer and recognition of learning outcomes
  • 3.1.8. Evaluation of the recognition policy, mechanisms and practices
  • 3.2. Analysis of country situation with respect to the criteria of the indicator for the “Recognition” area

Part 4. Partnerships and funding

  • 4.1. Description of country structures and policy interventions
  • 4.1.1. Policy targets in the thematic area of partnerships and funding
  • 4.1.2. Countrywide coordination of policy actions
  • 4.1.3. Partnerships
  • 4.1.3.1 Actions to support companies and IVET providers in the creation of mobility partnerships and networks
  • 4.1.3.2. Evaluation of the actions to support the creation of partnerships and networks
  • 4.1.4. Funding and other support
  • 4.1.4.1. Support to learners
  • 4.1.4.1.1. Actions to fund the international mobility of IVET learners
  • 4.1.4.1.2. Evaluation of the actions to provide IVET learners with financial support
  • 4.1.4.2. Support to stakeholders and staff
  • 4.1.4.2.1. Actions to provide companies, institutions and staff with support for organising mobility projects
  • 4.1.4.2.2. Evaluation of the support to organising mobility projects
  • 4.2. Analysis of country situation with respect to the criteria of the indicator for the “Partnerships and funding” area

Part 5. Motivation to participate in transnational learning mobility activities

  • 5.1. Description of country structures and policy interventions
  • 5.1.1. Actions for raising awareness of the added value of mobility and/or fostering a mobility culture
  • 5.1.2. Countrywide coordination of the awareness raising and mobility culture actions
  • 5.1.3. Evaluation of the awareness raising and mobility culture actions
  • 5.1.4. Policy targets in the thematic area of motivation
  • 5.2. Analysis of country situation with respect to the criteria of the indicator for the “Motivation” thematic area

Part 6. Preparation of opportunities for learning mobility

  • 6.1. Description of country structures and policy interventions
  • 6.1.1. Mobility preparation from the early stages of education
  • 6.1.2. Countrywide coordination of the preparation actions
  • 6.1.3. Evaluation of the preparation actions
  • 6.1.4. Policy targets in the thematic area of preparation
  • 6.1.5. How are learners (and stakeholders) involved in making the preparation policy effective?
  • 6.1.5.1. Visibility and access policy
  • 6.1.5.1.1. Making the preparation mechanisms visible and accessible: case of the linguistic and intercultural preparation
  • 6.1.5.1.2. Making the preparation mechanisms visible and accessible: case of the digital preparation mechanisms
  • 6.1.5.1.3. Making the preparation mechanisms visible and accessible: case of the internationalisation actions
  • 6.1.5.2. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys
  • 6.1.5.2.1. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the linguistic and intercultural preparation mechanisms
  • 6.1.5.2.2. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the digital preparation
  • 6.1.5.2.3. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the internationalisation actions
  • 6.1.5.3. Assessment of the extent of use
  • 6.1.5.3.1. Assessment of the extent of use of the mechanisms for linguistic and intercultural preparation
  • 6.1.5.3.2. Assessment of the extent of use of the digital preparation mechanisms
  • 6.1.5.3.3. Assessment of the extent of use of the internationalisation actions
  • 6.1.5.4. Other
  • 6.2. Analysis of country situation with respect to the criteria of the indicator for the “Preparation” thematic area

Part 7. Quality of learning mobility

  • 7.1. Description of country structures and policy interventions
  • 7.1.1. Ensuring the quality of mobility experiences
  • 7.1.2. Countrywide coordination of the quality-related actions
  • 7.1.3. Evaluation of the quality-related actions
  • 7.1.4. Policy targets in the thematic area of quality
  • 7.1.5. How are learners (and stakeholders) involved in making the quality policy effective?
  • 7.1.5.1. Visibility and access policy
  • 7.1.5.1.1. Making the quality mechanisms visible and accessible: case of the linguistic and intercultural preparation
  • 7.1.5.1.2. Making the quality mechanisms visible and accessible: case of the stay monitoring mechanisms
  • 7.1.5.1.3. Making the quality mechanisms visible and accessible: feedback collection and reintegration mechanisms
  • 7.1.5.1.4. Making the quality mechanisms visible and accessible: mechanisms for housing, catering and transport
  • 7.1.5.2. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys
  • 7.1.5.2.1. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the linguistic and intercultural preparation mechanisms
  • 7.1.5.2.2. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the stay monitoring mechanisms
  • 7.1.5.2.3. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the feedback and reintegration mechanisms
  • 7.1.5.2.4. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the mechanisms for housing, catering and transport
  • 7.1.5.3. Assessment of the extent of use
  • 7.1.5.3.1. Assessment of the extent of use of the mechanisms for linguistic and intercultural preparation
  • 7.1.5.3.2. Assessment of the extent of use of the stay monitoring mechanisms
  • 7.1.5.3.3. Assessment of the extent of use of the feedback and reintegration mechanisms
  • 7.1.5.3.4. Assessment of the extent of use of the mechanisms for housing, catering and transport
  • 7.1.5.4. Other
  • 7.2. Analysis of country situation with respect to the criteria of the indicator for the “Quality” thematic area

Part 7. Quality of learning mobility

  • 8.1. Description of country structures and policy interventions
  • 8.1.1. Grants and loans available to IVET learners for use within their country
  • 8.1.1.1. Types
  • 8.1.1.2. Purposes
  • 8.1.1.3. Funding bodies
  • 8.1.1.4. Access conditions and allocation principles
  • 8.1.1.5. Portability
  • 8.1.2. Portability policy
  • 8.1.3. Countrywide coordination of the portability mechanisms
  • 8.1.4. Evaluation of the portability mechanisms
  • 8.1.5. Policy targets in the thematic area of portability
  • 8.1.6. How are learners (and stakeholders) involved in making the portability policy effective?
  • 8.1.6.1. Making the portability mechanisms visible and accessible
  • 8.1.6.2. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the portability mechanisms
  • 8.1.6.3. Assessment of the extent of use of the portability mechanisms
  • 8.1.6.4. Other
  • 8.2. Analysis of country situation with respect to the criteria of the indicator for the “Portability” thematic area

Part 9. Taking on board disadvantaged learners

  • 9.1. Description of country structures and policy interventions
  • 9.1.1. Differentiated actions to provide disadvantaged learners with support tailored to their specific needs
  • 9.1.2. Countrywide coordination of the support measures for disadvantaged learners
  • 9.1.3. Evaluation of the support measures for disadvantaged learners
  • 9.1.4. Policy targets in the thematic area of support to disadvantaged learners
  • 9.1.5. How are learners (and stakeholders) involved in making effective the support policy for disadvantaged learners?
  • 9.1.5.1. Visibility and access policy
  • 9.1.5.1.1. Making the mechanisms for disadvantaged learners visible and accessible: case of information and guidance
  • 9.1.5.1.2. Making the mechanisms for disadvantaged learners visible and accessible: case of the funding actions
  • 9.1.5.1.3. Making the mechanisms for disadvantaged learners visible and accessible: actions in terms of motivation
  • 9.1.5.1.4. Making the mechanisms for disadvantaged learners visible and accessible: actions in terms of preparation
  • 9.1.5.1.5. Making the mechanisms for disadvantaged learners visible and accessible: actions in terms of multipliers
  • 9.1.5.2. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys
  • 9.1.5.2.1. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the actions in terms of information and guidance
  • 9.1.5.2.2. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the funding actions
  • 9.1.5.2.3. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the actions in terms of motivation
  • 9.1.5.2.4. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the actions in terms of preparation
  • 9.1.5.2.5. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the actions in terms of using multipliers
  • 9.1.5.3. Assessment of the extent of use
  • 9.1.5.3.1. Assessment of the extent of use of the mechanisms for information and guidance
  • 9.1.5.3.2. Assessment of the extent of use of the funding mechanisms
  • 9.1.5.3.3. Assessment of the extent of use of the motivation-related mechanisms
  • 9.1.5.3.4. Assessment of the extent of use of the preparation mechanisms
  • 9.1.5.3.5. Assessment of the extent of use of the actions in terms of using multipliers
  • 9.1.5.4. Other
  • 9.2. Analysis of country situation with respect to the criteria of the indicator for the “Disadvantaged learners” area

Part 10. Making use of multipliers

  • 10.1. Description of country structures and policy interventions
  • 10.1.1. Actions in terms of encouraging the use of multipliers and staff commitment to learning mobility
  • 10.1.2. Countrywide coordination of the multiplier policy
  • 10.1.3. Evaluation of the multiplier policy
  • 10.1.4. Policy targets in the thematic area of using multipliers
  • 10.1.5. How are learners (and stakeholders) involved in making effective the multiplier policy?
  • 10.1.5.1. Visibility and access policy
  • 10.1.5.1.1. Making the multiplier policy visible and accessible: case of the actions in terms of using multipliers
  • 10.1.5.1.2. Making the multiplier policy visible and accessible: actions recognising and valuing staff commitment
  • 10.1.5.1.3. Making the multiplier policy visible and accessible: case of the actions in terms of mainstreaming mobility
  • 10.1.5.2. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys
  • 10.1.5.2.1. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the actions in terms of using multipliers
  • 10.1.5.2.2. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the actions in terms of recognising and valuing staff commitment
  • 10.1.5.2.3. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the actions in terms of mainstreaming mobility in the training
  • 10.1.5.3. Assessment of the extent of use
  • 10.1.5.3.1. Assessment of the extent of use of the mechanisms for using multipliers
  • 10.1.5.3.2. Assessment of the extent of use of the mechanisms for recognising and valuing staff commitment
  • 10.1.5.3.3. Assessment of the extent of use of the mechanisms for mainstreaming mobility in the training
  • 10.1.5.4. Other
  • 10.2. Analysis of country situation with respect to the criteria of the indicator for the “Multipliers” thematic area

Part 11. Synthesis - Policy suggestions

SE Sweden (2019)

7.1.1. ENSURING THE QUALITY OF MOBILITY EXPERIENCES

Swedish education is governed by curricula and decentralised. The country has taken actions that cover the following dimensions:

Language preparation
It is up to the local school that arranges mobility to ensure that learners are prepared which includes linguistic preparedness. Therefore there are a multitude of actions, mechanisms and methods used, some of which are described below. UHR provides linguistic support through the Erasmus+ Online Linguistic Support site. Language assessment is mandatory for participants in mobility actions, and participation in language courses is voluntary. It is the responsibility of the sending school to ensure that students have received proper linguistic and intercultural preparation, setting up Learning agreements, etc. There are also examples of schools that take in language teachers or mother tongue teachers in the groups that will participate in a mobility action to prepare the students through an introduction in general and professional aspects of the target language.

Stay monitoring
It is up to the local school that arranges mobility to ensure that the stay process is monitored and evaluated so that the process can be improved. Therefore there are a multitude of actions, mechanisms and methods used, some of which are described below. Schools allocate someone responsible for planning mobility. Usually it is a teacher or international coordinator. This person plans the before, during and after, including how to integrate the students and monitor the stay process. In most cases a teacher or international coordinator accompanies the students to the receiving country and performs parts of this work there. There are schools that send teachers for all or parts of the mobility duration to the receiving country. The schools do not only have to monitor the stay in order to guide and integrate the students, but also to follow up their learning process since the mobility almost always is part of the mandatory work-based learning included in all VET-programmes. The school has to have mechanisms for assessing the learning to include it in the grading of the courses and subjects. Teachers communicate with the students trough internet, or skype and telephone. Students have to document their learning which has to be related to knowledge requirements and goals of the subject syllabuses. Formerly students documented their learning process by writing journals, these are now replaced with blogs, including photo- and videoblogs. Examples: A mobility project coordinator has argued that for successful mobility, one must monitor and support students and trainers throughout the mobility period. The coordinator calls them frequently and goes there to visit them. Another coordinator has stressed the importance of including the students in the whole process, to write to the workplace in which they will train, provide information at meetings with students and their parents and make students involved in writing the learning agreements. The coordinator also stresses the importance of assuring that the workplace can provide work-based learning in which all elements of the subject syllabus is provided in the duration of training. Both statements show actions that point to a process of monitoring the stay and ensuring the quality of the mobility. A teacher has explained that she travelled and stayed with her students during the mobility to support them.

Feedback collection
Swedish education is governed by curricula and decentralised. It is up to the local school that arranges mobility to ensure that feedback is collected and the stay is evaluated so that the process can be improved. Therefore there are a multitude of actions, mechanisms and methods used, some of which are described below. Feedback is collected by the school for its own quality assurance and assessment of the learning. Schools collect feedback on both practical issues regarding mobility in general (what went well and what needs to be improved) and the learning induced through the mobility action. The methods of collecting feedback are not regulated, but surveys, written reports, diaries/blogs open-ended questions are commonly used. Feedback is also collected for reports on the mobility to UHR on the same grounds.

Transport, housing, catering
Swedish education is governed by curricula and decentralised. It is up to the local school that arranges mobility to organise transport, accommodation and catering. There are a multitude of actions, mechanisms and methods used, some of which are described below. Since education is free of charge in Sweden, any mobility that is part of the learners' education must also be free of charge for the learner, which includes the provision of accommodation and transport. Thus all costs must be provided for by the school organiser. Since education is decentralised, it is up to the schools to develop its methods for providing accommodation and transport. In most cases the school allocates someone responsible for planning mobility, which includes the provision of accommodation and transport. In the Erasmus+ programme, housing, catering and transport are eligible costs for the organiser of mobility to apply funding for. If there are exchanges between schools in Sweden and another country, students often stay at each others' homes. There are examples of schools that have had the students planning practical aspects like transport and catering as part of the preparation or part of a course in the Hotel and tourism programme.