You are here

Mobility scoreboard database

Country fiches provide detailed country-specific information and policy suggestions relating to IVET mobility for each of the 30 countries (EU Member States, Iceland, Norway) covered. The topics addressed in the fiches are as follows:

  • IVET level(s) covered in the fiche
  • Main schemes for international IVET mobility
  • Overview on the general governance of the IVET mobility policy
  • Overall targets in IVET mobility policy
  • Overall coordination of IVET mobility policy
  • Overall evaluation of the IVET mobility policy

Part 1. Information and guidance on international learning mobility for IVET

  • 1.1. Description of country structures and policy interventions
  • 1.1.1. Mechanism(s) to provide IVET learners with information and guidance on international learning mobility
  • 1.1.2. Countrywide coordination of information and guidance provision
  • 1.1.3. Policy targets in the thematic area of information and guidance
  • 1.1.4. Do legal provisions specifically include the objective of promoting international learning mobility in IVET?
  • 1.1.5. Actions for improving the provision of information and guidance on international learning mobility for IVET learners
  • 1.1.6. Evaluation of the actions for improving the provision of information and guidance
  • 1.1.7. Provision of information and assistance on IVET international mobility to companies and IVET institutions
  • 1.2. Analysis of country situation with respect to the criteria of the indicator for the “Information and guidance” area

Part 2. Administrative and institutional issues

  • 2.1. Description of country structures and policy interventions
  • 2.1.1. Existence of a policy orientation to encourage and support international learning mobility of IVET learners
  • 2.1.1.1. Integration of international learning mobility experiences in the curricula of IVET programmes
  • 2.1.1.2. Policy targets in the thematic area of removing administrative and institutional obstacles
  • 2.1.2. Measures to facilitate learning mobility in IVET
  • 2.1.2.1. Measures to smooth the delivery of visas and residency permits to IVET learners from third countries
  • 2.1.2.2. Measures to reduce administrative burdens that may hinder the international mobility of learners
  • 2.1.2.3. Measures to remove the legal obstacles to the international mobility of minor IVET learners
  • 2.1.2.4. Social and labour protection of apprentices and IVET students involved in international learning mobility
  • 2.1.3. Coordination and evaluation
  • 2.1.3.1. Coordination of the measures targeted at removing the administrative and institutional obstacles
  • 2.1.3.2. Evaluation of the measures targeted at removing the administrative and institutional obstacles
  • 2.2. Analysis of country situation with respect to the criteria of the indicator for the “Adm. and institutional issues” area

Part 3. Recognition of learning outcomes

  • 3.1. Description of country structures and policy interventions
  • 3.1.1. General approach to the recognition of learning acquired abroad by IVET learners
  • 3.1.1.1. Regulation by law or case by case treatment?
  • 3.1.1.2. Ease of access to recognition of learning acquired abroad by IVET learners
  • 3.1.2. Policy targets in thematic area of recognition
  • 3.1.3. Scope of recognition
  • 3.1.4. Countrywide coordination of the recognition approach
  • 3.1.5. Time limit for the recognition process
  • 3.1.6. Visibility of contact points for information on recognition
  • 3.1.6.1. Actions to establish, or make more visible, contact points for information on recognition
  • 3.1.6.2. Evaluation of the visibility policy
  • 3.1.7. Use of EU tools for visibility, transfer and recognition of learning outcomes
  • 3.1.8. Evaluation of the recognition policy, mechanisms and practices
  • 3.2. Analysis of country situation with respect to the criteria of the indicator for the “Recognition” area

Part 4. Partnerships and funding

  • 4.1. Description of country structures and policy interventions
  • 4.1.1. Policy targets in the thematic area of partnerships and funding
  • 4.1.2. Countrywide coordination of policy actions
  • 4.1.3. Partnerships
  • 4.1.3.1 Actions to support companies and IVET providers in the creation of mobility partnerships and networks
  • 4.1.3.2. Evaluation of the actions to support the creation of partnerships and networks
  • 4.1.4. Funding and other support
  • 4.1.4.1. Support to learners
  • 4.1.4.1.1. Actions to fund the international mobility of IVET learners
  • 4.1.4.1.2. Evaluation of the actions to provide IVET learners with financial support
  • 4.1.4.2. Support to stakeholders and staff
  • 4.1.4.2.1. Actions to provide companies, institutions and staff with support for organising mobility projects
  • 4.1.4.2.2. Evaluation of the support to organising mobility projects
  • 4.2. Analysis of country situation with respect to the criteria of the indicator for the “Partnerships and funding” area

Part 5. Motivation to participate in transnational learning mobility activities

  • 5.1. Description of country structures and policy interventions
  • 5.1.1. Actions for raising awareness of the added value of mobility and/or fostering a mobility culture
  • 5.1.2. Countrywide coordination of the awareness raising and mobility culture actions
  • 5.1.3. Evaluation of the awareness raising and mobility culture actions
  • 5.1.4. Policy targets in the thematic area of motivation
  • 5.2. Analysis of country situation with respect to the criteria of the indicator for the “Motivation” thematic area

Part 6. Preparation of opportunities for learning mobility

  • 6.1. Description of country structures and policy interventions
  • 6.1.1. Mobility preparation from the early stages of education
  • 6.1.2. Countrywide coordination of the preparation actions
  • 6.1.3. Evaluation of the preparation actions
  • 6.1.4. Policy targets in the thematic area of preparation
  • 6.1.5. How are learners (and stakeholders) involved in making the preparation policy effective?
  • 6.1.5.1. Visibility and access policy
  • 6.1.5.1.1. Making the preparation mechanisms visible and accessible: case of the linguistic and intercultural preparation
  • 6.1.5.1.2. Making the preparation mechanisms visible and accessible: case of the digital preparation mechanisms
  • 6.1.5.1.3. Making the preparation mechanisms visible and accessible: case of the internationalisation actions
  • 6.1.5.2. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys
  • 6.1.5.2.1. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the linguistic and intercultural preparation mechanisms
  • 6.1.5.2.2. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the digital preparation
  • 6.1.5.2.3. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the internationalisation actions
  • 6.1.5.3. Assessment of the extent of use
  • 6.1.5.3.1. Assessment of the extent of use of the mechanisms for linguistic and intercultural preparation
  • 6.1.5.3.2. Assessment of the extent of use of the digital preparation mechanisms
  • 6.1.5.3.3. Assessment of the extent of use of the internationalisation actions
  • 6.1.5.4. Other
  • 6.2. Analysis of country situation with respect to the criteria of the indicator for the “Preparation” thematic area

Part 7. Quality of learning mobility

  • 7.1. Description of country structures and policy interventions
  • 7.1.1. Ensuring the quality of mobility experiences
  • 7.1.2. Countrywide coordination of the quality-related actions
  • 7.1.3. Evaluation of the quality-related actions
  • 7.1.4. Policy targets in the thematic area of quality
  • 7.1.5. How are learners (and stakeholders) involved in making the quality policy effective?
  • 7.1.5.1. Visibility and access policy
  • 7.1.5.1.1. Making the quality mechanisms visible and accessible: case of the linguistic and intercultural preparation
  • 7.1.5.1.2. Making the quality mechanisms visible and accessible: case of the stay monitoring mechanisms
  • 7.1.5.1.3. Making the quality mechanisms visible and accessible: feedback collection and reintegration mechanisms
  • 7.1.5.1.4. Making the quality mechanisms visible and accessible: mechanisms for housing, catering and transport
  • 7.1.5.2. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys
  • 7.1.5.2.1. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the linguistic and intercultural preparation mechanisms
  • 7.1.5.2.2. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the stay monitoring mechanisms
  • 7.1.5.2.3. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the feedback and reintegration mechanisms
  • 7.1.5.2.4. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the mechanisms for housing, catering and transport
  • 7.1.5.3. Assessment of the extent of use
  • 7.1.5.3.1. Assessment of the extent of use of the mechanisms for linguistic and intercultural preparation
  • 7.1.5.3.2. Assessment of the extent of use of the stay monitoring mechanisms
  • 7.1.5.3.3. Assessment of the extent of use of the feedback and reintegration mechanisms
  • 7.1.5.3.4. Assessment of the extent of use of the mechanisms for housing, catering and transport
  • 7.1.5.4. Other
  • 7.2. Analysis of country situation with respect to the criteria of the indicator for the “Quality” thematic area

Part 7. Quality of learning mobility

  • 8.1. Description of country structures and policy interventions
  • 8.1.1. Grants and loans available to IVET learners for use within their country
  • 8.1.1.1. Types
  • 8.1.1.2. Purposes
  • 8.1.1.3. Funding bodies
  • 8.1.1.4. Access conditions and allocation principles
  • 8.1.1.5. Portability
  • 8.1.2. Portability policy
  • 8.1.3. Countrywide coordination of the portability mechanisms
  • 8.1.4. Evaluation of the portability mechanisms
  • 8.1.5. Policy targets in the thematic area of portability
  • 8.1.6. How are learners (and stakeholders) involved in making the portability policy effective?
  • 8.1.6.1. Making the portability mechanisms visible and accessible
  • 8.1.6.2. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the portability mechanisms
  • 8.1.6.3. Assessment of the extent of use of the portability mechanisms
  • 8.1.6.4. Other
  • 8.2. Analysis of country situation with respect to the criteria of the indicator for the “Portability” thematic area

Part 9. Taking on board disadvantaged learners

  • 9.1. Description of country structures and policy interventions
  • 9.1.1. Differentiated actions to provide disadvantaged learners with support tailored to their specific needs
  • 9.1.2. Countrywide coordination of the support measures for disadvantaged learners
  • 9.1.3. Evaluation of the support measures for disadvantaged learners
  • 9.1.4. Policy targets in the thematic area of support to disadvantaged learners
  • 9.1.5. How are learners (and stakeholders) involved in making effective the support policy for disadvantaged learners?
  • 9.1.5.1. Visibility and access policy
  • 9.1.5.1.1. Making the mechanisms for disadvantaged learners visible and accessible: case of information and guidance
  • 9.1.5.1.2. Making the mechanisms for disadvantaged learners visible and accessible: case of the funding actions
  • 9.1.5.1.3. Making the mechanisms for disadvantaged learners visible and accessible: actions in terms of motivation
  • 9.1.5.1.4. Making the mechanisms for disadvantaged learners visible and accessible: actions in terms of preparation
  • 9.1.5.1.5. Making the mechanisms for disadvantaged learners visible and accessible: actions in terms of multipliers
  • 9.1.5.2. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys
  • 9.1.5.2.1. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the actions in terms of information and guidance
  • 9.1.5.2.2. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the funding actions
  • 9.1.5.2.3. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the actions in terms of motivation
  • 9.1.5.2.4. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the actions in terms of preparation
  • 9.1.5.2.5. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the actions in terms of using multipliers
  • 9.1.5.3. Assessment of the extent of use
  • 9.1.5.3.1. Assessment of the extent of use of the mechanisms for information and guidance
  • 9.1.5.3.2. Assessment of the extent of use of the funding mechanisms
  • 9.1.5.3.3. Assessment of the extent of use of the motivation-related mechanisms
  • 9.1.5.3.4. Assessment of the extent of use of the preparation mechanisms
  • 9.1.5.3.5. Assessment of the extent of use of the actions in terms of using multipliers
  • 9.1.5.4. Other
  • 9.2. Analysis of country situation with respect to the criteria of the indicator for the “Disadvantaged learners” area

Part 10. Making use of multipliers

  • 10.1. Description of country structures and policy interventions
  • 10.1.1. Actions in terms of encouraging the use of multipliers and staff commitment to learning mobility
  • 10.1.2. Countrywide coordination of the multiplier policy
  • 10.1.3. Evaluation of the multiplier policy
  • 10.1.4. Policy targets in the thematic area of using multipliers
  • 10.1.5. How are learners (and stakeholders) involved in making effective the multiplier policy?
  • 10.1.5.1. Visibility and access policy
  • 10.1.5.1.1. Making the multiplier policy visible and accessible: case of the actions in terms of using multipliers
  • 10.1.5.1.2. Making the multiplier policy visible and accessible: actions recognising and valuing staff commitment
  • 10.1.5.1.3. Making the multiplier policy visible and accessible: case of the actions in terms of mainstreaming mobility
  • 10.1.5.2. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys
  • 10.1.5.2.1. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the actions in terms of using multipliers
  • 10.1.5.2.2. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the actions in terms of recognising and valuing staff commitment
  • 10.1.5.2.3. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the actions in terms of mainstreaming mobility in the training
  • 10.1.5.3. Assessment of the extent of use
  • 10.1.5.3.1. Assessment of the extent of use of the mechanisms for using multipliers
  • 10.1.5.3.2. Assessment of the extent of use of the mechanisms for recognising and valuing staff commitment
  • 10.1.5.3.3. Assessment of the extent of use of the mechanisms for mainstreaming mobility in the training
  • 10.1.5.4. Other
  • 10.2. Analysis of country situation with respect to the criteria of the indicator for the “Multipliers” thematic area

Part 11. Synthesis - Policy suggestions

PT Portugal (2019)

6.1.1. MOBILITY PREPARATION FROM THE EARLY STAGES OF EDUCATION

Portugal has taken actions for the long-term preparation of students in the linguistic, intercultural and digital areas

1. Linguistic preparation
The Portuguese education system offers English as a foreign language from the age of six, although it is neither a compulsory offer nor a curricular discipline in the first two years of the 1st cycle of basic education (lasting four years). However, since 2014, it became a compulsory subject in the two last years (1) with a minimum of two hours per week. At the end of the 1st cycle, pupils are expected to reach the A1 level. Thus, the learning of English is compulsory for seven consecutive years. The study of a second foreign language is compulsory during the 3rd cycle (corresponding to lower secondary education).
As regards the application of the principles of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages, Portugal has accredited the European Language Portfolio (ELP) for primary and lower and upper secondary education.
Portugal also participates in the English-Speaking Union (ESU), the activities of which in the country have been taking place for about twenty years, with emphasis on cultural exchanges, conferences, travel grants, debates and public-speaking in English (for secondary and higher education). Since 2013, ESU Portugal has the institutional support of the Directorate-General for Education – DGE.
Some partnerships and pilot projects between public and private entities have also been put in place with the purpose of studying possible future measures to promote a quality language culture from the early stages of formal education.
- One such example is the Bilingual Schools Programme (PEBI): since 2011, the DGE has worked in partnership with the British Council Portugal in some primary schools across the country where part of the curriculum was delivered in English. Primary teachers were supported by English teachers in teaching part of two curricular subjects – natural & social environment and artistic expressions – in English. The British Council worked closely with the DGE on delivering training courses, carrying out school monitoring visits and providing teaching resources. A full external evaluation study was conducted in 2014 and presented in 2015 (2). Based on the results obtained, the programme was renewed and opened to other levels of education and teaching and to a broader network of schools. In 2018, the goal of widening this offer to 5% of all schools by 2020 was set.
- Another example is the Kiitos@21st Century Preschools, an international project for the period 2015 to 2018, aimed at an integrated pedagogical approach to preschool education, promoting the early learning of a second language along with music education and “skills for the 21st century”. The DGE accompanied the project in 2014/2015, carrying out technical-pedagogical monitoring (3).
- The project Teaching Chinese in Basic Education is the result of a partnership between the Municipality of São João da Madeira, the University of Aveiro, and the three school groupings in the municipality. It aims at promoting the learning of Mandarin and the knowledge of Chinese culture. The scientific and pedagogical supervision of the project is under the joint responsibility of the Department of Languages and Cultures of the University of Aveiro and the Confucius Institute at this University. The education ministry bodies monitor and evaluate the project. The project was implemented in 2012/13, on an experimental basis, in the 3rd year of basic education and was progressively extended to the 7th year (4) as a complementary subject..
- Also, the European Language Label (ELL) competition annually rewards the most innovative language-learning projects in the country. Schools, institutes, universities, training centres, companies and other institutions that work on initiatives with foreign languages can apply.
With regard to the IVET curriculum, communication in foreign languages is a compulsory subject for all VET programmes at upper secondary education. In articulation with the general and specific competences contained in the Common European Framework of Reference and the National curriculum of basic education, VET programmes target core language skills as well as sociocultural and learning skills, to be developed/acquired in an articulated way throughout the cycle. Learners can choose the foreign language they wish to study according to their study plan. The qualifications required from candidates for enrolment in a VET programme (although they may vary according to factors such as age or type of programme) generally presuppose that the learner has previously acquired a certain level of language skills in the formal education system.
In terms of inbound mobility, the linguistic preparation of foreign students is set to ensure their effective integration in the national education system. The curriculum for basic education and for the scientific-humanistic and specialised art programmes in secondary education may thus include the subject of Portuguese as a Non-Native Language (PLNM), aimed at students newly arrived in the education system that do not have Portuguese as their mother tongue. Following a diagnostic evaluation process or a level transition process, students placed at the initial (A1 / A2) or intermediate (B1) proficiency levels follow the PLNM curriculum at their respective level rather than the Portuguese language curriculum of the school year they are attending. If the school does not meet the conditions to create a PLNM class, students attend the general Portuguese subject but follow the PLNM curriculum, and should additionally benefit from PLNM support classes. This learning path allows the completion of secondary education as well as access to higher education (except when the higher education institution requires a Portuguese entrance exam).

2. Intercultural preparation
In 2012, the DGE developed guidelines for integrating the subject of Education for Citizenship in the national curriculum from preschool to upper secondary education. Decree-Law No. 55/2018 changed this subject to Citizenship and Development, reinforcing the awareness about intercultural contexts. Since the 2018/2019 school year, this subject has become mandatory in all programmes under the responsibility of the education ministry. Public and private upper secondary schools may select how to introduce it in the curricula, ranging from a separate subject or integrating it into other subjects.
The Network of schools for intercultural education (REEI) programme created within the framework of the Strategic Plan for Migration 2015–2020 is a joint initiative of the High Commissioner for Migration (ACM), the DGE and the Aga Khan Foundation. The programme promotes not only the reception, integration and educational success of all children and young people from pre-school to secondary education but also creates a network for sharing practices between public education schools, training providers and private and cooperative educational institutions, aiming at the intercultural education of all members of the educational community. The ACM also offers several resources and training materials and actions to citizens, professionals and organisations on the issues of inter-culturalism and migrations, across the country, delivering awareness-raising sessions and training actions. In a joint initiative with the DGE, the ACM also created the Intercultural School Seal in 2012, which aims to distinguish schools that excel in the development of projects promoting the recognition and appreciation of diversity as an opportunity and source of learning for all.
The European Clubs, a national network coordinated by the education ministry, also contributes to introducing a global and intercultural dimension in curriculum development. Implemented in schools across the country and managed mainly by teachers of the schools involved, these are spaces that aim at promoting activities in the field of the European dimension in education. They create among the members of the school community a sense of European citizenship, fostering the acquisition of knowledge about Europe (geographical, historical and cultural aspects), European institutions and the purpose of European integration, and promoting foreign languages and exchanges with students from foreign schools. Launched in the academic year 2013/14, the European Club Bulletin disseminates projects, themes and activities developed by clubs throughout the country. The DGE promotes annual national meetings to foster dialogue and debate among clubs and disseminate good practices.

3. Fostering the acquisition of basic digital competencies by IVET learners
ICT is a compulsory subject for all programmes from primary to upper secondary education. In primary education’s curricula, ICT is a transversal subject. Depending on the programme, ICT training includes modules on: worksheet; database management; creation of web pages; Web page editing; Web graphics animation; understanding the impact of the Internet on perceptual habits to develop a critical attitude towards available content.
ICTs also play a key role in stimulating participation in learning processes in the education of learners with special needs, as well as in the professional integration of people with disabilities. A national network of ICT resource centres (CRTIC) for special education was created, consisting of 25 centres based in school groupings. The purpose of these centres is to evaluate students in view of adapting technologies to meet their specific needs..
Attention has also been paid to the ICT training of teachers and trainers. Since 2009, the education ministry has been implementing the Training and Certification System for ICT Competences of teaching staff from pre-school to secondary education. The system has three levels, according to the principle of progressive expansion of acquired skills. The use of MOOC courses as well as that of platforms such as eTwinning or moodle is encouraged and has also enabled Portuguese teachers to create collaborative networks with other European schools, through the development of joint projects using the internet and ICT, thus seeking to integrate students into international projects. The Educational resources and technologies team – ERTE of the DGE promotes accredited training courses for teachers and trainers regularly and throughout the country. A major initiative taken by the ERTE of the DGE is the ICT Competence Centres (CCTIC). This network currently comprises nine institutions (mostly from higher education) resulting from protocols established with the education ministry. The mission of the CCTICs is to support schools in the educational use of ICTs and, ultimately, to promote innovative teaching towards the improvement and internationalisation of teaching and learning processes in Portugal.
Finally, there are several good practices in ICT training in Portugal carried out and supported both by public authorities and private organisations, in particular:
- Escola Global, most likely the only school in Portugal where all textbooks are digital. Technologies such as digital writing and collaborative digital tools as well as educational resources created by the teachers result in an innovative experience for students.
- Introduction to Programming in primary education has been piloted in 388 school groupings (44 393 pupils) since the school year 2016/2017.
- Academia de Código is a project created with the support of Lisbon Municipal Council and the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, in three primary schools in Lisbon which have integrated basic programming skills into the curricula of students of the 3rd and 4th years.
_______________
(1) Decree-Law (Decreto-Lei) No. 176/2014, of 12 December (https://dre.pt/application/file/a/63958168)
(2) http://www.dge.mec.pt/sites/default/files/Projetos_Curriculares/Linguas/....
(3) http://www.cm-pontedesor.pt/images/educacao/SOCIOEDUCATIVO/CenturyPresch...
(4) Corresponding to the 1st year of lower secondary education (http://www.dge.mec.pt/ensino-de-chines-no-ensino-basico).

GB United Kingdom (2019)

6.1.1. MOBILITY PREPARATION FROM THE EARLY STAGES OF EDUCATION

1. Encourage quality linguistic and intercultural preparation of IVET learners for mobility from the early stages of education:

The majority of foreign language learning in the UK takes place prior to students embarking on a full-time VET related course. IVET programmes may include foreign language learning at the discretion of the VET provider. Foreign language learning taking place alongside a VET programme may be related to specific professions, but again – at the discretion of the provider.
A foreign language is a compulsory subject up to key stage 3 (age 14) in schools that are obliged to follow the national curriculum in England. Schools are free to choose which foreign language to offer students. French, German and Spanish are most common, but a wide range is generally available. Some schools offer more than one foreign language, but are often restricted by a lack of teachers. Education and training provided above key stage 3 are not covered by a national curriculum. The majority of VET including apprenticeships is delivered in the further education and skills sector at upper secondary level (age 16+) in England. At this level education and training providers are free to work with students to find them the most suitable study programme they offer.Language subjects taught before key stage 3 is mostly general in nature, but can be work related for students above 16 years of age if appropriate.

According to a survey by the British Council, 46 per cent of schools teach a foreign language in years 1-2 for at least 45 minutes per week. In years 3 to 6, the majority (nearly 80%) of schools taught teach a language for between 30 and 60 minutes per week. More than 60% of secondary schools providedd between two and three hours of foreign language teaching for years 7-9 students in 2016. The percentage was in excess of 70 for years 10-11.

In the primary sector in Scotland, despite innovative practice in some schools in beginning language learning early, children are not expected to experience modern language learning until year 6 (age 9-10). Some schools offer learners subject choices in the early part of the secondary school, with the option to give up language learning before the end of their broad general education. The choice of languages taught is decided by individual schools.

The new curriculum currently being developed in Wales will includes languages, literacy and communication as one of the six areas of Learning and Experience from age 3 to 16. Literacy will is also be one of three cross curriculum responsibilities. Languages offered will be chosen by the schools. The study of modern foreign languages is currently only compulsory at key stage 3 (ages 11-14) in Wales. Modern foreign languages are available at colleges and other post-16 education and training providers; however, there are no compulsory subjects at this stage of education, so students choose learning programmes based on availability from education and training providers.

Modern languages are compulsory subjects within the statutory curriculum for schools in Northern Ireland at key stage three (ages 11-13). At key stage four (ages 14-16) communication is one of the cross-curricular skills. As part of the Entitlement Framework in Northern Ireland, schools must provide at least one official language of the European Union (other than English, and Irish) course for students up to age 16.
Modern foreign languages are offered, but are not compulsory, in colleges for students aged 16+.

Around 1,400 Foreign Language Assistants help boost foreign language provision in schools in the UK. Partly funded by the Department for Education via a grant to the British Council, Language Assistants from the UK and other Member States may apply for a small personal allowance payment under Erasmus+ which supplements the salary they receive from their host schools. The 2016 British Council language trends report discovered that cuts in school budgets have resulted in fewer schools employing foreign language assistants.

"Speak to the future" is a campaign for languages aiming to highlight the importance of languages, language learning and professional language activities for the UK. The campaign targets the public, media, government and policymakers and tries to raise the profile of languages on the agenda and to bring about a step-change in attitudes and policy.

2. Foster the acquisition of basic digital competencies by IVET learners:

Computing is a compulsory subject up to key stage 4 (age 16) in schools in England that are obliged to follow the national curriculum; however, education and training provided above this level are only covered by a reduced national curriculum. Providers are required to offer post-16 students study programmes that include ICT if it "is directly relevant to effective performance in either the particular occupation or the sector", unless the students have not already achieved a satisfactory level. This is also the case for apprenticeships. ICT can be embedded into vocational courses, such as plumbing by researching materials via the internet, e-mailing suppliers, word-processing invoices, using a spreadsheet for products and prices, creating a website and taking digital photos before, during and after jobs to add to it, and maintaining an electronic diary.

ICT is included in most curriculum areas within the Scottish Curriculum for Excellence (up to age 16). At this age students are expected to be familiar with using appropriate software to solve complex issues, using ICT effectively in learning contexts and select information in a range of tasks, as well as using a computer system to process and organise information. Schools, further education and higher education institutions build Core Skills and/or other transferable skills into their educational programmes; however, in many circumstances this is not mandatory. The Core Skill in ICT consists of accessing information and providing / creating information. The Core Skill in ICT must be included in Modern Apprenticeships and may be included in other vocational qualifications as both optional and mandatory units.

The Welsh Baccalaureate framework includes a Skills Certificate, which comprises digital literacy. The curriculum includes science and technology (including computer science) as one of six areas of Learning and Experience from 3 to 16. Digital competence is also one of three cross curriculum responsibilities. The aim of the Essential Skills Wales ICT / digital literacy qualification is to encourage candidates to develop and demonstrate their skills in using ICT to carry out a task or activity by finding, exploring, exchanging, developing and presenting information.

Science and technology are compulsory subjects within the statutory curriculum for schools in Northern Ireland at key stage three (ages 11- 13). At key stage four (ages 14-16) using ICT is one of the cross-curricular skills. Essential Skills are nationally accredited qualifications offered to students in Northern Ireland colleges. Qualifications are available in ICT at qualifications framework levels 1 and 2. ICT Essential Skills qualifications comprise the elements of using ICT systems, finding and exchanging information, and developing and presenting information.

Apprenticeships in Northern Ireland comprise Essential Skills qualifications in communication, numeracy and ICT