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Mobility scoreboard database

Country fiches provide detailed country-specific information and policy suggestions relating to IVET mobility for each of the 30 countries (EU Member States, Iceland, Norway) covered. The topics addressed in the fiches are as follows:

  • IVET level(s) covered in the fiche
  • Main schemes for international IVET mobility
  • Overview on the general governance of the IVET mobility policy
  • Overall targets in IVET mobility policy
  • Overall coordination of IVET mobility policy
  • Overall evaluation of the IVET mobility policy

Part 1. Information and guidance on international learning mobility for IVET

  • 1.1. Description of country structures and policy interventions
  • 1.1.1. Mechanism(s) to provide IVET learners with information and guidance on international learning mobility
  • 1.1.2. Countrywide coordination of information and guidance provision
  • 1.1.3. Policy targets in the thematic area of information and guidance
  • 1.1.4. Do legal provisions specifically include the objective of promoting international learning mobility in IVET?
  • 1.1.5. Actions for improving the provision of information and guidance on international learning mobility for IVET learners
  • 1.1.6. Evaluation of the actions for improving the provision of information and guidance
  • 1.1.7. Provision of information and assistance on IVET international mobility to companies and IVET institutions
  • 1.2. Analysis of country situation with respect to the criteria of the indicator for the “Information and guidance” area

Part 2. Administrative and institutional issues

  • 2.1. Description of country structures and policy interventions
  • 2.1.1. Existence of a policy orientation to encourage and support international learning mobility of IVET learners
  • 2.1.1.1. Integration of international learning mobility experiences in the curricula of IVET programmes
  • 2.1.1.2. Policy targets in the thematic area of removing administrative and institutional obstacles
  • 2.1.2. Measures to facilitate learning mobility in IVET
  • 2.1.2.1. Measures to smooth the delivery of visas and residency permits to IVET learners from third countries
  • 2.1.2.2. Measures to reduce administrative burdens that may hinder the international mobility of learners
  • 2.1.2.3. Measures to remove the legal obstacles to the international mobility of minor IVET learners
  • 2.1.2.4. Social and labour protection of apprentices and IVET students involved in international learning mobility
  • 2.1.3. Coordination and evaluation
  • 2.1.3.1. Coordination of the measures targeted at removing the administrative and institutional obstacles
  • 2.1.3.2. Evaluation of the measures targeted at removing the administrative and institutional obstacles
  • 2.2. Analysis of country situation with respect to the criteria of the indicator for the “Adm. and institutional issues” area

Part 3. Recognition of learning outcomes

  • 3.1. Description of country structures and policy interventions
  • 3.1.1. General approach to the recognition of learning acquired abroad by IVET learners
  • 3.1.1.1. Regulation by law or case by case treatment?
  • 3.1.1.2. Ease of access to recognition of learning acquired abroad by IVET learners
  • 3.1.2. Policy targets in thematic area of recognition
  • 3.1.3. Scope of recognition
  • 3.1.4. Countrywide coordination of the recognition approach
  • 3.1.5. Time limit for the recognition process
  • 3.1.6. Visibility of contact points for information on recognition
  • 3.1.6.1. Actions to establish, or make more visible, contact points for information on recognition
  • 3.1.6.2. Evaluation of the visibility policy
  • 3.1.7. Use of EU tools for visibility, transfer and recognition of learning outcomes
  • 3.1.8. Evaluation of the recognition policy, mechanisms and practices
  • 3.2. Analysis of country situation with respect to the criteria of the indicator for the “Recognition” area

Part 4. Partnerships and funding

  • 4.1. Description of country structures and policy interventions
  • 4.1.1. Policy targets in the thematic area of partnerships and funding
  • 4.1.2. Countrywide coordination of policy actions
  • 4.1.3. Partnerships
  • 4.1.3.1 Actions to support companies and IVET providers in the creation of mobility partnerships and networks
  • 4.1.3.2. Evaluation of the actions to support the creation of partnerships and networks
  • 4.1.4. Funding and other support
  • 4.1.4.1. Support to learners
  • 4.1.4.1.1. Actions to fund the international mobility of IVET learners
  • 4.1.4.1.2. Evaluation of the actions to provide IVET learners with financial support
  • 4.1.4.2. Support to stakeholders and staff
  • 4.1.4.2.1. Actions to provide companies, institutions and staff with support for organising mobility projects
  • 4.1.4.2.2. Evaluation of the support to organising mobility projects
  • 4.2. Analysis of country situation with respect to the criteria of the indicator for the “Partnerships and funding” area

Part 5. Motivation to participate in transnational learning mobility activities

  • 5.1. Description of country structures and policy interventions
  • 5.1.1. Actions for raising awareness of the added value of mobility and/or fostering a mobility culture
  • 5.1.2. Countrywide coordination of the awareness raising and mobility culture actions
  • 5.1.3. Evaluation of the awareness raising and mobility culture actions
  • 5.1.4. Policy targets in the thematic area of motivation
  • 5.2. Analysis of country situation with respect to the criteria of the indicator for the “Motivation” thematic area

Part 6. Preparation of opportunities for learning mobility

  • 6.1. Description of country structures and policy interventions
  • 6.1.1. Mobility preparation from the early stages of education
  • 6.1.2. Countrywide coordination of the preparation actions
  • 6.1.3. Evaluation of the preparation actions
  • 6.1.4. Policy targets in the thematic area of preparation
  • 6.1.5. How are learners (and stakeholders) involved in making the preparation policy effective?
  • 6.1.5.1. Visibility and access policy
  • 6.1.5.1.1. Making the preparation mechanisms visible and accessible: case of the linguistic and intercultural preparation
  • 6.1.5.1.2. Making the preparation mechanisms visible and accessible: case of the digital preparation mechanisms
  • 6.1.5.1.3. Making the preparation mechanisms visible and accessible: case of the internationalisation actions
  • 6.1.5.2. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys
  • 6.1.5.2.1. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the linguistic and intercultural preparation mechanisms
  • 6.1.5.2.2. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the digital preparation
  • 6.1.5.2.3. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the internationalisation actions
  • 6.1.5.3. Assessment of the extent of use
  • 6.1.5.3.1. Assessment of the extent of use of the mechanisms for linguistic and intercultural preparation
  • 6.1.5.3.2. Assessment of the extent of use of the digital preparation mechanisms
  • 6.1.5.3.3. Assessment of the extent of use of the internationalisation actions
  • 6.1.5.4. Other
  • 6.2. Analysis of country situation with respect to the criteria of the indicator for the “Preparation” thematic area

Part 7. Quality of learning mobility

  • 7.1. Description of country structures and policy interventions
  • 7.1.1. Ensuring the quality of mobility experiences
  • 7.1.2. Countrywide coordination of the quality-related actions
  • 7.1.3. Evaluation of the quality-related actions
  • 7.1.4. Policy targets in the thematic area of quality
  • 7.1.5. How are learners (and stakeholders) involved in making the quality policy effective?
  • 7.1.5.1. Visibility and access policy
  • 7.1.5.1.1. Making the quality mechanisms visible and accessible: case of the linguistic and intercultural preparation
  • 7.1.5.1.2. Making the quality mechanisms visible and accessible: case of the stay monitoring mechanisms
  • 7.1.5.1.3. Making the quality mechanisms visible and accessible: feedback collection and reintegration mechanisms
  • 7.1.5.1.4. Making the quality mechanisms visible and accessible: mechanisms for housing, catering and transport
  • 7.1.5.2. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys
  • 7.1.5.2.1. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the linguistic and intercultural preparation mechanisms
  • 7.1.5.2.2. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the stay monitoring mechanisms
  • 7.1.5.2.3. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the feedback and reintegration mechanisms
  • 7.1.5.2.4. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the mechanisms for housing, catering and transport
  • 7.1.5.3. Assessment of the extent of use
  • 7.1.5.3.1. Assessment of the extent of use of the mechanisms for linguistic and intercultural preparation
  • 7.1.5.3.2. Assessment of the extent of use of the stay monitoring mechanisms
  • 7.1.5.3.3. Assessment of the extent of use of the feedback and reintegration mechanisms
  • 7.1.5.3.4. Assessment of the extent of use of the mechanisms for housing, catering and transport
  • 7.1.5.4. Other
  • 7.2. Analysis of country situation with respect to the criteria of the indicator for the “Quality” thematic area

Part 7. Quality of learning mobility

  • 8.1. Description of country structures and policy interventions
  • 8.1.1. Grants and loans available to IVET learners for use within their country
  • 8.1.1.1. Types
  • 8.1.1.2. Purposes
  • 8.1.1.3. Funding bodies
  • 8.1.1.4. Access conditions and allocation principles
  • 8.1.1.5. Portability
  • 8.1.2. Portability policy
  • 8.1.3. Countrywide coordination of the portability mechanisms
  • 8.1.4. Evaluation of the portability mechanisms
  • 8.1.5. Policy targets in the thematic area of portability
  • 8.1.6. How are learners (and stakeholders) involved in making the portability policy effective?
  • 8.1.6.1. Making the portability mechanisms visible and accessible
  • 8.1.6.2. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the portability mechanisms
  • 8.1.6.3. Assessment of the extent of use of the portability mechanisms
  • 8.1.6.4. Other
  • 8.2. Analysis of country situation with respect to the criteria of the indicator for the “Portability” thematic area

Part 9. Taking on board disadvantaged learners

  • 9.1. Description of country structures and policy interventions
  • 9.1.1. Differentiated actions to provide disadvantaged learners with support tailored to their specific needs
  • 9.1.2. Countrywide coordination of the support measures for disadvantaged learners
  • 9.1.3. Evaluation of the support measures for disadvantaged learners
  • 9.1.4. Policy targets in the thematic area of support to disadvantaged learners
  • 9.1.5. How are learners (and stakeholders) involved in making effective the support policy for disadvantaged learners?
  • 9.1.5.1. Visibility and access policy
  • 9.1.5.1.1. Making the mechanisms for disadvantaged learners visible and accessible: case of information and guidance
  • 9.1.5.1.2. Making the mechanisms for disadvantaged learners visible and accessible: case of the funding actions
  • 9.1.5.1.3. Making the mechanisms for disadvantaged learners visible and accessible: actions in terms of motivation
  • 9.1.5.1.4. Making the mechanisms for disadvantaged learners visible and accessible: actions in terms of preparation
  • 9.1.5.1.5. Making the mechanisms for disadvantaged learners visible and accessible: actions in terms of multipliers
  • 9.1.5.2. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys
  • 9.1.5.2.1. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the actions in terms of information and guidance
  • 9.1.5.2.2. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the funding actions
  • 9.1.5.2.3. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the actions in terms of motivation
  • 9.1.5.2.4. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the actions in terms of preparation
  • 9.1.5.2.5. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the actions in terms of using multipliers
  • 9.1.5.3. Assessment of the extent of use
  • 9.1.5.3.1. Assessment of the extent of use of the mechanisms for information and guidance
  • 9.1.5.3.2. Assessment of the extent of use of the funding mechanisms
  • 9.1.5.3.3. Assessment of the extent of use of the motivation-related mechanisms
  • 9.1.5.3.4. Assessment of the extent of use of the preparation mechanisms
  • 9.1.5.3.5. Assessment of the extent of use of the actions in terms of using multipliers
  • 9.1.5.4. Other
  • 9.2. Analysis of country situation with respect to the criteria of the indicator for the “Disadvantaged learners” area

Part 10. Making use of multipliers

  • 10.1. Description of country structures and policy interventions
  • 10.1.1. Actions in terms of encouraging the use of multipliers and staff commitment to learning mobility
  • 10.1.2. Countrywide coordination of the multiplier policy
  • 10.1.3. Evaluation of the multiplier policy
  • 10.1.4. Policy targets in the thematic area of using multipliers
  • 10.1.5. How are learners (and stakeholders) involved in making effective the multiplier policy?
  • 10.1.5.1. Visibility and access policy
  • 10.1.5.1.1. Making the multiplier policy visible and accessible: case of the actions in terms of using multipliers
  • 10.1.5.1.2. Making the multiplier policy visible and accessible: actions recognising and valuing staff commitment
  • 10.1.5.1.3. Making the multiplier policy visible and accessible: case of the actions in terms of mainstreaming mobility
  • 10.1.5.2. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys
  • 10.1.5.2.1. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the actions in terms of using multipliers
  • 10.1.5.2.2. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the actions in terms of recognising and valuing staff commitment
  • 10.1.5.2.3. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the actions in terms of mainstreaming mobility in the training
  • 10.1.5.3. Assessment of the extent of use
  • 10.1.5.3.1. Assessment of the extent of use of the mechanisms for using multipliers
  • 10.1.5.3.2. Assessment of the extent of use of the mechanisms for recognising and valuing staff commitment
  • 10.1.5.3.3. Assessment of the extent of use of the mechanisms for mainstreaming mobility in the training
  • 10.1.5.4. Other
  • 10.2. Analysis of country situation with respect to the criteria of the indicator for the “Multipliers” thematic area

Part 11. Synthesis - Policy suggestions

DK Denmark (2019)

2.1.2.1. MEASURES TO SMOOTH THE DELIVERY OF VISAS AND RESIDENCY PERMITS TO IVET LEARNERS FROM THIRD COUNTRIES

In Denmark, measures have been taken to smooth the delivery of visas and residency permits for foreigners, including incoming IVET learners from third countries.
The Danish Government established the International Citizen Service (ISC), consisting of four offices in the country and a portal, providing in one place information about moving to, working and studying in Denmark. These measures facilitate the delivery of visas and residence permits to IVET learners from third countries, offering help with the paperwork, personal guidance and useful information (2).
___________________
(2) www.icitizen.dk

FR France (2019)

2.1.2.1. MEASURES TO SMOOTH THE DELIVERY OF VISAS AND RESIDENCY PERMITS TO IVET LEARNERS FROM THIRD COUNTRIES

The law of 7 March 2016 relating to the rights of foreigners in France includes several measures to improve the right of residence and simplify formalities for foreign students, namely (1):
- the creation of a multi-year residence permit until the end of the course of study. This multiannual residence permit, which had already been in effect for master's and doctoral students since 2013, was extended at the beginning of the 2016 academic year to students having completed at least one year of their bachelor's degree;
- the creation of a multiannual "talent passport" residence permit with a maximum duration of 4 years, in particular for researchers, doctoral students and young graduates with a master's degree in paid employment;
- the procedure for the examination of applications for long-stay student visas by French consulates is being speeded up and it is now compulsory to explain the reasons when the visa application is refused;
- the residence certificate requirement for foreign students enrolled in a master's degree has been abolished.

Where apprenticeship is concerned, work permits are granted to any foreigner holding a stay permit in France for the purpose of concluding an apprenticeship contract.
New provisions on the right of residence of students are included in the law of 10 September 2018 on asylum and immigration (2). Students at Master's level or higher wishing to work in France or start a business will be able to benefit from a one-year temporary residence permit mentioning "job search or business creation". As before, the job or business creation project must be related to the training or research carried out. A new feature of the law aimed at promoting "circular mobility" is that it is now possible to apply for this residence permit after leaving the country, within four years of obtaining the diploma.
_______
(1) https://www.legifrance.gouv.fr/affichTexte.do?cidTexte=JORFTEXT000032164...
(2) (1) https://www.legifrance.gouv.fr/eli/loi/2018/9/10/INTX1801788L/jo/texte

DE Germany (2019)

2.1.2.1. MEASURES TO SMOOTH THE DELIVERY OF VISAS AND RESIDENCY PERMITS TO IVET LEARNERS FROM THIRD COUNTRIES

The measure put in place is a website providing transparent information for the criteria applied when deciding whether a visa should be issued to learners from third countries or not. The website is combined with a personal telephone hotline for personal advice (1).
____________
(1) (http://www.make-it-in-germany.com/en/for-qualified-professionals/trainin...).

LV Latvia (2019)

2.1.2.1. MEASURES TO SMOOTH THE DELIVERY OF VISAS AND RESIDENCY PERMITS TO IVET LEARNERS FROM THIRD COUNTRIES

In Latvia, there are in force agreements on the facilitation of the issuance of visas between the European Union and the following third countries: Russian Federation, Ukraine, Armenia, Moldova, Georgia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Serbia, Albania, Azerbaijan, the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia and Cape Verde (1). A written request or a confirmation of enrolment from the host education institution, student cards or certificates of the courses to be attended are sufficient documents for justifying the purpose of the journey to the Latvia for students and accompanying teachers who undertake trips for educational purposes, including in the framework of exchange programmes, as well as other school-related activities. All categories of visas are issued for them according to the simplified procedure without requiring any other justification, invitation or validation concerning the purpose of the journey.
In addition, fees for processing the visa application are waived for the mentioned target group (2). The relevant regulations (3) stipulate the costs for individuals wishing to obtain visas and residency permits. The regulations determine that categories of persons exempted from payment of the State fee include:
- Students who arrive to study in an accredited Latvian education institution within the framework of an exchange programme and their inviter;
- Students who arrive for a training placement or traineeship at an accredited Latvian education institution or a registered commercial company and the training or traineeship is related to legal relationship of employment;
- Full-time students of an accredited Latvian higher education institution who have been admitted to studies in a master's or doctoral programme and their inviter.
_______
(1) http://www.mfa.gov.lv/en/consular-information/european-community-visa-fa...
(2)
http://www.mfa.gov.lv/en/consular-information/obtaining-visas/visa-appli...
(3) Cabinet of Ministers “Regulations regarding the state fee for examination of the documents necessary for requesting a visa, residence permit or the status of a long-term resident of the European Union in the Republic of Latvia and the services related thereto” (2017) https://likumi.lv/ta/id/293626

NL Netherlands (2019)

2.1.2.1. MEASURES TO SMOOTH THE DELIVERY OF VISAS AND RESIDENCY PERMITS TO IVET LEARNERS FROM THIRD COUNTRIES

The country has taken actions to smooth the delivery of visas and residency permits to IVET learners from third countries. If a VET student from outside the EU wants to study in the Netherlands for longer than 90 days, the educational institute (VET school) needs to be licensed by the IND (Immigration and Naturalisation Service) as a ‘Referent’. All accredited institutions are registered and the register is available on the internet. It is for the educational institute to arrange the necessary visa and permits for the student. The ‘Referent’ has the task to monitor and guide the student during their stay in the Netherlands.

SI Slovenia (2019)

2.1.2.1. MEASURES TO SMOOTH THE DELIVERY OF VISAS AND RESIDENCY PERMITS TO IVET LEARNERS FROM THIRD COUNTRIES

Incoming students from non-EU countries who have been accepted to study in Slovenia at any level of education or specialisation, such as professional training, practical training or international student exchange in an appropriate educational institution, receive their residence permit, according to the current Slovenian Foreigners Act. According to Article 44 of this Act, an application for a temporary residence permit for study purposes should receive priority treatment by the competent authorities. In addition, Slovenia has signed bilateral cooperation agreements in the field of education with former Yugoslavia countries, so visas are no longer needed.