You are here

Mobility scoreboard database

Visit the
Mobility scoreboard project
for background information,
methodology and project objectives,
news updates and events.
Indicators of mobility in higher education and initial VET are available on the joint EACEA/Eurydice - Cedefop platform. Learn more on mobility in higher education in EACEA/Eurydice background report.

Updated with 2017 data.

The Mobility Scoreboard for IVET is a tool for assisting policy-making in the broad area of international learning mobility in IVET.

It is intended for:

  1. policy makers (both at national and EU levels);
  2. “mobility users”, i.e. IVET learners’ organisations and mobility organisers (VET institutions, mobility agencies, companies involved in mobility, guidance institutions, staff involved in organising mobility activities);
  3. experts, researchers, and the wide public.

The “How To” tab below has suggestions on how to best use the data.

Country fiches provide detailed country-specific information and policy suggestions relating to IVET mobility for each of the 30 countries (EU Member States, Iceland, Norway) covered. The topics addressed in the fiches are as follows:

IVET level(s) covered in the fiche
Main schemes for international IVET mobility

Overview on the general governance of the IVET mobility policy
Overall targets in IVET mobility policy
Overall coordination of IVET mobility policy
Overall evaluation of the IVET mobility policy

Part 1. Information and guidance on international learning mobility for IVET
1.1. Description of country structures and policy interventions
1.1.1. Mechanism(s) to provide IVET learners with information and guidance on international learning mobility
1.1.2. Countrywide coordination of information and guidance provision
1.1.3. Policy targets in the thematic area of information and guidance
1.1.4. Do legal provisions specifically include the objective of promoting international learning mobility in IVET?
1.1.5. Actions for improving the provision of information and guidance on international learning mobility for IVET learners
1.1.6. Evaluation of the actions for improving the provision of information and guidance
1.1.7. Provision of information and assistance on IVET international mobility to companies and IVET institutions
1.2. Analysis of country situation with respect to the criteria of the indicator for the “Information and guidance” area
Part 2. Administrative and institutional issues
2.1. Description of country structures and policy interventions
2.1.1. Existence of a policy orientation to encourage and support international learning mobility of IVET learners
2.1.1.1. Integration of international learning mobility experiences in the curricula of IVET programmes
2.1.1.2. Policy targets in the thematic area of removing administrative and institutional obstacles
2.1.2. Measures to facilitate learning mobility in IVET
2.1.2.1. Measures to smooth the delivery of visas and residency permits to IVET learners from third countries
2.1.2.2. Measures to reduce administrative burdens that may hinder the international mobility of learners
2.1.2.3. Measures to remove the legal obstacles to the international mobility of minor IVET learners
2.1.2.4. Social and labour protection of apprentices and IVET students involved in international learning mobility
2.1.3. Coordination and evaluation
2.1.3.1. Coordination of the measures targeted at removing the administrative and institutional obstacles
2.1.3.2. Evaluation of the measures targeted at removing the administrative and institutional obstacles
2.2. Analysis of country situation with respect to the criteria of the indicator for the “Adm. and institutional issues” area
Part 3. Recognition of learning outcomes
3.1. Description of country structures and policy interventions
3.1.1. General approach to the recognition of learning acquired abroad by IVET learners
3.1.1.1. Regulation by law or case by case treatment?
3.1.1.2. Ease of access to recognition of learning acquired abroad by IVET learners
3.1.2. Policy targets in thematic area of recognition
3.1.3. Scope of recognition
3.1.4. Countrywide coordination of the recognition approach
3.1.5. Time limit for the recognition process
3.1.6. Visibility of contact points for information on recognition
3.1.6.1. Actions to establish, or make more visible, contact points for information on recognition
3.1.6.2. Evaluation of the visibility policy
3.1.7. Use of EU tools for visibility, transfer and recognition of learning outcomes
3.1.8. Evaluation of the recognition policy, mechanisms and practices
3.2. Analysis of country situation with respect to the criteria of the indicator for the “Recognition” area
Part 4. Partnerships and funding
4.1. Description of country structures and policy interventions
4.1.1. Policy targets in the thematic area of partnerships and funding
4.1.2. Countrywide coordination of policy actions
4.1.3. Partnerships
4.1.3.1 Actions to support companies and IVET providers in the creation of mobility partnerships and networks
4.1.3.2. Evaluation of the actions to support the creation of partnerships and networks
4.1.4. Funding and other support
4.1.4.1. Support to learners
4.1.4.1.1. Actions to fund the international mobility of IVET learners
4.1.4.1.2. Evaluation of the actions to provide IVET learners with financial support
4.1.4.2. Support to stakeholders and staff
4.1.4.2.1. Actions to provide companies, institutions and staff with support for organising mobility projects
4.1.4.2.2. Evaluation of the support to organising mobility projects
4.2. Analysis of country situation with respect to the criteria of the indicator for the “Partnerships and funding” area
Part 5. Motivation to participate in transnational learning mobility activities
5.1. Description of country structures and policy interventions
5.1.1. Actions for raising awareness of the added value of mobility and/or fostering a mobility culture
5.1.2. Countrywide coordination of the awareness raising and mobility culture actions
5.1.3. Evaluation of the awareness raising and mobility culture actions
5.1.4. Policy targets in the thematic area of motivation
5.2. Analysis of country situation with respect to the criteria of the indicator for the “Motivation” thematic area
Part 6. Preparation of opportunities for learning mobility
6.1. Description of country structures and policy interventions
6.1.1. Mobility preparation from the early stages of education
6.1.2. Countrywide coordination of the preparation actions
6.1.3. Evaluation of the preparation actions
6.1.4. Policy targets in the thematic area of preparation
6.1.5. How are learners (and stakeholders) involved in making the preparation policy effective?
6.1.5.1. Visibility and access policy
6.1.5.1.1. Making the preparation mechanisms visible and accessible: case of the linguistic and intercultural preparation
6.1.5.1.2. Making the preparation mechanisms visible and accessible: case of the digital preparation mechanisms
6.1.5.1.3. Making the preparation mechanisms visible and accessible: case of the internationalisation actions
6.1.5.2. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys
6.1.5.2.1. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the linguistic and intercultural preparation mechanisms
6.1.5.2.2. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the digital preparation
6.1.5.2.3. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the internationalisation actions
6.1.5.3. Assessment of the extent of use
6.1.5.3.1. Assessment of the extent of use of the mechanisms for linguistic and intercultural preparation
6.1.5.3.2. Assessment of the extent of use of the digital preparation mechanisms
6.1.5.3.3. Assessment of the extent of use of the internationalisation actions
6.1.5.4. Other
6.2. Analysis of country situation with respect to the criteria of the indicator for the “Preparation” thematic area
Part 7. Quality of learning mobility
7.1. Description of country structures and policy interventions
7.1.1. Ensuring the quality of mobility experiences
7.1.2. Countrywide coordination of the quality-related actions
7.1.3. Evaluation of the quality-related actions
7.1.4. Policy targets in the thematic area of quality
7.1.5. How are learners (and stakeholders) involved in making the quality policy effective?
7.1.5.1. Visibility and access policy
7.1.5.1.1. Making the quality mechanisms visible and accessible: case of the linguistic and intercultural preparation
7.1.5.1.2. Making the quality mechanisms visible and accessible: case of the stay monitoring mechanisms
7.1.5.1.3. Making the quality mechanisms visible and accessible: feedback collection and reintegration mechanisms
7.1.5.1.4. Making the quality mechanisms visible and accessible: mechanisms for housing, catering and transport
7.1.5.2. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys
7.1.5.2.1. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the linguistic and intercultural preparation mechanisms
7.1.5.2.2. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the stay monitoring mechanisms
7.1.5.2.3. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the feedback and reintegration mechanisms
7.1.5.2.4. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the mechanisms for housing, catering and transport
7.1.5.3. Assessment of the extent of use
7.1.5.3.1. Assessment of the extent of use of the mechanisms for linguistic and intercultural preparation
7.1.5.3.2. Assessment of the extent of use of the stay monitoring mechanisms
7.1.5.3.3. Assessment of the extent of use of the feedback and reintegration mechanisms
7.1.5.3.4. Assessment of the extent of use of the mechanisms for housing, catering and transport
7.1.5.4. Other
7.2. Analysis of country situation with respect to the criteria of the indicator for the “Quality” thematic area
Part 8. Portability of grants and loans
8.1. Description of country structures and policy interventions
8.1.1. Grants and loans available to IVET learners for use within their country
8.1.1.1. Types
8.1.1.2. Purposes
8.1.1.3. Funding bodies
8.1.1.4. Access conditions and allocation principles
8.1.1.5. Portability
8.1.2. Portability policy
8.1.3. Countrywide coordination of the portability mechanisms
8.1.4. Evaluation of the portability mechanisms
8.1.5. Policy targets in the thematic area of portability
8.1.6. How are learners (and stakeholders) involved in making the portability policy effective?
8.1.6.1. Making the portability mechanisms visible and accessible
8.1.6.2. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the portability mechanisms
8.1.6.3. Assessment of the extent of use of the portability mechanisms
8.1.6.4. Other
8.2. Analysis of country situation with respect to the criteria of the indicator for the “Portability” thematic area
Part 9. Taking on board disadvantaged learners
9.1. Description of country structures and policy interventions
9.1.1. Peculiar actions to provide disadvantaged learners with support tailored to their specific needs
9.1.2. Countrywide coordination of the support measures for disadvantaged learners
9.1.3. Evaluation of the support measures for disadvantaged learners
9.1.4. Policy targets in the thematic area of support to disadvantaged learners
9.1.5. How are learners (and stakeholders) involved in making effective the support policy for disadvantaged learners?
9.1.5.1. Visibility and access policy
9.1.5.1.1. Making the mechanisms for disadvantaged learners visible and accessible: case of information and guidance
9.1.5.1.2. Making the mechanisms for disadvantaged learners visible and accessible: case of the funding actions
9.1.5.1.3. Making the mechanisms for disadvantaged learners visible and accessible: actions in terms of motivation
9.1.5.1.4. Making the mechanisms for disadvantaged learners visible and accessible: actions in terms of preparation
9.1.5.1.5. Making the mechanisms for disadvantaged learners visible and accessible: actions in terms of multipliers
9.1.5.2. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys
9.1.5.2.1. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the actions in terms of information and guidance
9.1.5.2.2. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the funding actions
9.1.5.2.3. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the actions in terms of motivation
9.1.5.2.4. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the actions in terms of preparation
9.1.5.2.5. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the actions in terms of using multipliers
9.1.5.3. Assessment of the extent of use
9.1.5.3.1. Assessment of the extent of use of the mechanisms for information and guidance
9.1.5.3.2. Assessment of the extent of use of the funding mechanisms
9.1.5.3.3. Assessment of the extent of use of the motivation-related mechanisms
9.1.5.3.4. Assessment of the extent of use of the preparation mechanisms
9.1.5.3.5. Assessment of the extent of use of the actions in terms of using multipliers
9.1.5.4. Other
9.2. Analysis of country situation with respect to the criteria of the indicator for the “Disadvantaged learners” area
Part 10. Making use of multipliers
10.1. Description of country structures and policy interventions
10.1.1. Actions in terms of encouraging the use of multipliers and staff commitment to learning mobility
10.1.2. Countrywide coordination of the multiplier policy
10.1.3. Evaluation of the multiplier policy
10.1.4. Policy targets in the thematic area of using multipliers
10.1.5. How are learners (and stakeholders) involved in making effective the multiplier policy?
10.1.5.1. Visibility and access policy
10.1.5.1.1. Making the multiplier policy visible and accessible: case of the actions in terms of using multipliers
10.1.5.1.2. Making the multiplier policy visible and accessible: actions recognising and valuing staff commitment
10.1.5.1.3. Making the multiplier policy visible and accessible: case of the actions in terms of mainstreaming mobility
10.1.5.2. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys
10.1.5.2.1. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the actions in terms of using multipliers
10.1.5.2.2. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the actions in terms of recognising and valuing staff commitment
10.1.5.2.3. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the actions in terms of mainstreaming mobility in the training
10.1.5.3. Assessment of the extent of use
10.1.5.3.1. Assessment of the extent of use of the mechanisms for using multipliers
10.1.5.3.2. Assessment of the extent of use of the mechanisms for recognising and valuing staff commitment
10.1.5.3.3. Assessment of the extent of use of the mechanisms for mainstreaming mobility in the training
10.1.5.4. Other
10.2. Analysis of country situation with respect to the criteria of the indicator for the “Multipliers” thematic area
Part 11. Synthesis - Policy suggestions

You can select one or several topics (or all); and one or several countries.

GB United Kingdom (2015)

IVET level(s) covered in this fiche:

Upper secondary
Post-secondary non-tertiary
Tertiary

The terms IVET and CVET are not officially defined within the formal education systems in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland. In Wales, vocational qualifications have now been categorised into IVET and CVET groups from January 2015. IVET programmes in Wales are introductory and do not lead to occupational competence, whilst CVET programmes lead to occupational competence. Only IVET should be available to learners at 14 to 16, with either category available as appropriate post-16. Moving from IVET to CVET should be recognised as progression even where learning remains at CQFW (1) level 2 (EQF level 3). This fiche refers to policies and initiatives that relate to secondary, post-secondary and tertiary level vocational education. Secondary VET represents the majority of UK vocational students registered on programmes relevant to this fiche.

(1) Credit and Qualifications Framework Wales

Main schemes for international IVET mobility

Mobility scheme: Erasmus+
Source of funds: European
Target group: IVET learners AND other groups (general)

Mobility scheme: Europass
Source of funds: European and national budget
Target group: IVET learners and other groups

Mobility scheme: ECVET
Source of funds: European and national budget
Target group: IVET learners and other groups;

Mobility scheme: International Exchange Programme UK (IEPUK)
Source of funds: Private
Target group: IVET learners and other groups

OVERVIEW OF THE GENERAL GOVERNANCE OF THE IVET MOBILITY POLICY
OVERALL TARGETS IN IVET MOBILITY POLICY

Neither quantitative nor qualitative targets have been set countrywide in the UK. Mobility is the responsibility of individual organisations that may set their own targets, although international learning mobility is encouraged and supported by national organisations, such as ColegauCymru (CollegesWales) in Wales, at VET level in further education colleges. In Northern Ireland, responses to a consultation on the development of a new Further Education Strategy are currently under consideration. This strategy includes a policy commitment for the further education colleges to enhance the learner experience, as well as the professional development and industrial knowledge of their staff through placements and exchanges with institutions in other countries.

Although there aren’t any specific targets for international IVET mobility, there is an interest at the policy and institutional level to increase the current low level of mobility. Targets are set for programmes such as Erasmus+ and include targets for widening participation as well as the overall number. It is an objective for the UK National Agencies for the Erasmus+ programme to ensure maximum take up of the funding is achieved in the UK. To ensure this is achieved, the National Agencies promote the programme widely and offer support and guidance to UK organisations and institutions.

OVERALL COORDINATION OF IVET MOBILITY POLICY
OVERALL EVALUATION OF THE IVET MOBILITY POLICY
PART 1. INFORMATION AND GUIDANCE ON INTERNATIONAL LEARNING MOBILITY FOR IVET
1.1. DESCRIPTION OF COUNTRY STRUCTURES AND POLICY INTERVENTIONS
1.1.1. MECHANISM(S) TO PROVIDE IVET LEARNERS WITH INFORMATION AND GUIDANCE ON INTERNATIONAL LEARNING MOBILITY

Schools and colleges are the principal providers of career advice, information and guidance to learners. Education and training providers direct learners to information from websites and printed material, invite external speakers and information officers, and arrange for learners to attend career fairs. Some providers also deliver dedicated careers lessons. Career advice and guidance about further study opportunities are mostly provided by internal school and college staff in England, including professional career advisers, teachers, tutors, and student services support staff, but also by externally contracted professional career advisers. The majority of colleges provide individualised career advice and guidance, as well as career education classes. Whilst guidelines from national authorities regarding the inclusion of information on periods of study or placements abroad exist, the content and extent of information and guidance vary from provider to provider. In Northern Ireland all post primary school and further education college learners can avail of impartial career guidance provided by professionally qualified career advisers from the Department for Employment and Learning. The information, advice and guidance provided is tailored to the needs of the individual, outlining the opportunities available both locally nationally and internationally to help them achieve their career aspiration.

Several information and guidance mechanisms accessible to IVET learners and career information and guidance officers at education and training providers are in place. The National Agencies for Erasmus+ in the UK – British Council and Ecorys – maintain the UK Erasmus+ website containing information about EU VET mobility funding opportunities. Careers Europe provide information to career advisers, students and anyone interested in going abroad on their website and at events, such as careers fairs. The National Europass Centre informs individuals and education providers of tools that can be used to document periods of mobility and aid recognition of learning. The UK Eurodesk centre is run by Ecorys. Its website contains information about mobility opportunities for HE and VET within Europe. The British Council has a UK facing website for individuals interested in studying or working overseas. This isn’t specifically for IVET students but includes IVET in its scope. It is a source of information and guidance for UK students. The outward facing website is Education UK. This has a lot of information and practical advice and guidance for individuals wanting to study in the UK

In Scotland, guidance is available through organisations such as the Scottish European Education Network and Scotland Goes Global, the latter of which provide “Ambassadors” who go into schools, colleges and universities to provide advice – and a global citizenship and study abroad module delivered in schools.

1.1.2. COUNTRYWIDE COORDINATION OF INFORMATION AND GUIDANCE PROVISION

Whilst much information and guidance to learners about international mobility opportunities is delivered by education and training providers in the UK, there are several organisations and contact points that promote and distribute information across the UK, with the four UK education jurisdictions retaining responsibility. UK-wide coordination is ensured through regular meetings, such as the UK European Coordination Group for VET Initiatives, which brings together the coordinators of initiatives and their government counterparts for exchanging information. The group’s role includes ensuring that, both from a user perspective as well as a policy perspective, the synergies between these initiatives is optimised and communicated.

1.1.3. POLICY TARGETS IN THE THEMATIC AREA OF INFORMATION AND GUIDANCE
1.1.4. DO LEGAL PROVISIONS SPECIFICALLY INCLUDE THE OBJECTIVE OF PROMOTING INTERNATIONAL LEARNING MOBILITY IN IVET?

The document Careers guidance and inspiration, Guidance for general further education colleges and sixth form colleges, issued by the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills and the Department for Education in March 2015 requires that colleges in England ensure that all their students have access to and are taking advantage of information about further study and work opportunities, including work and study abroad.

Other documents address more narrowly career mobility rather than learning mobility. The Welsh Government issued the document Careers and the world of work: a framework for 11 to 19-year-olds in Wales in 2008. The document asks providers to ensure that learners research a range of information about careers and the labour market, and “explore how opportunities in Britain, Europe and the rest of the world might impact upon their career ideas”. For Northern Ireland, the document Preparing for success: Careers Education, Information, Advice and Guidance issued in 2008 states that school leavers and adults will “have developed information handling skills and be aware of career opportunities locally, nationally and internationally.”

1.1.5. ACTIONS FOR IMPROVING THE PROVISION OF INFORMATION AND GUIDANCE ON INTERNATIONAL LEARNING MOBILITY FOR IVET LEARNERS

Challenges related to providing learners with face-to-face guidance regarding mobility opportunities in England are reported to include a lack of funding for dedicated careers advisers and sufficient face-to-face sessions, time constraints and advice delivered in an impartial manner from an adviser that keeps up-to-date of all relevant mobility opportunities. In Northern Ireland there is no restriction on learners accessing face-to-face impartial guidance from careers advisers, who are up to date with mobility opportunities.

The policy of the UK Erasmus+ National Agencies, Ecorys and British Council, is aligned to the overall aims of Erasmus+, and will respond flexibly to changing UK requirements and priorities up to 2020. It will be monitored and reviewed annually in line with the National Agency Work Programme cycle, and comprise measures such as:
- Build evaluation baseline for marketing and communications activities;
- General promotion of Erasmus+ and Key Actions;
- Targeted promotion responding to emerging and existing gaps;
- Promotion of cross-sectoral approaches and projects; and
- Building learning networks.

To support the work of VET providers and enhance quality, the UK Erasmus+ National Agencies have also developed guidelines on how to apply for Erasmus+ funding and how to ensure quality mobility. UK guidelines have also been produced on recognising achievements during mobility periods.

1.1.6. EVALUATION OF THE ACTIONS FOR IMPROVING THE PROVISION OF INFORMATION AND GUIDANCE

The Erasmus+ National Agencies (Ecorys and British Council) monitor and review communications activities. They have a philosophy of continuous improvement and always look for ways in which to improve their service to their customers. This includes obtaining feedback from participants of information and guidance sessions. Monitoring and impact measurement take place in the following ways: (a) Capture and analysis of data for online and digital activities; (b) Capture of feedback.

The Erasmus+ National Agencies are required to report formally on a quarterly basis to the UK government on UK performance on international IVET as well as activities that include programme promotion and guidance to applicants. The UK National Agencies are also required to report on a yearly basis to the European Commission on the performance of the programme that includes numbers of types of international IVET. This report is supported by an audit of the National Agencies from an independent auditing body.

A UK Programme Board (made up of UK and Devolved Administration Government departments), Sector Consultative Groups and Country Advisory Groups (Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland) work to improve the provision of information and guidance in conjunction with the Erasmus+ National Agency function.

CollegesWales makes use of the Erasmus+ country statistics produced by the UK National Agency to monitor and increase participation in mobility programmes in Wales.

The Careers Service in Northern Ireland has achieved matrix accreditation. The matrix Standard is the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills’ quality standard for organisations to assess and measure their advice and support services, which ultimately supports individuals in their choice of career, learning, work and life goals.

1.1.7. PROVISION OF INFORMATION AND ASSISTANCE ON IVET INTERNATIONAL MOBILITY TO COMPANIES AND IVET INSTITUTIONS

Stakeholders mentioned in Section 1.1.1 maintain websites, distribute promotional and information material, hold and attend events, and act as contact centres dealing with direct questions.

The Erasmus+ National Agencies receive ongoing feedback on the quality of their assistance from stakeholders through regular sector consultative group meetings that aim to ensure assistance materials meet the need of the VET institutions and organisations.

1.2. ANALYSIS OF COUNTRY SITUATION WITH RESPECT TO THE CRITERIA OF THE INDICATOR FOR THE “INFORMATION AND GUIDANCE” THEMATIC AREA

UK has in place several mechanisms to provide IVET learners with information and guidance for their international learning mobility. This provision is coordinated countrywide through regular meetings, such as the UK European Coordination Group for VET Initiatives, which brings together the coordinators of initiatives and their government counterparts for exchanging information. Several activities are carried out by the UK Erasmus+ National Agencies, Ecorys and British Council, to improve the provision. Evaluation of provision and improvement actions takes place through a range of channels (capture of users’ feedback, statistical monitoring, reporting).

PART 2. ADMINISTRATIVE AND INSTITUTIONAL ISSUES
2.1. DESCRIPTION OF COUNTRY STRUCTURES AND POLICY INTERVENTIONS
2.1.1. EXISTENCE OF A POLICY ORIENTATION TO ENCOURAGE AND SUPPORT INTERNATIONAL LEARNING MOBILITY OF IVET LEARNERS
2.1.1.1. INTEGRATION OF INTERNATIONAL LEARNING MOBILITY EXPERIENCES IN THE CURRICULA OF IVET PROGRAMMES

The Northern Ireland Strategy on Apprenticeships (Securing our Success: The Northern Ireland Strategy on Apprenticeships) from June 2014 sets out a policy commitment that includes to “fully utilise opportunities for international placements and exchanges.” It goes on to explain that the “Government will establish links with partner countries across Europe, and internationally, to provide opportunities for placements and exchanges through exploring the use of EU programmes, such as Erasmus+ and considering incentives for participating employers”.

The Developing Scotland’s Global Citizens project has produced a draft outward mobility strategy, which encourages colleges to create more accessible study abroad opportunities, and encourages secondary schools to raise the profile of mobility opportunities and emphasise the benefits of language skills.

The Scottish government’s Outward Mobility Fund (OMF) that is available to university and college students is part of the lifelong learning strategy, and aims to provide Scottish students with support for new opportunities to study overseas by funding mobility projects.

2.1.1.2. POLICY TARGETS IN THE THEMATIC AREA OF REMOVING ADMINISTRATIVE AND INSTITUTIONAL OBSTACLES
2.1.2. MEASURES TO FACILITATE LEARNING MOBILITY IN IVET
2.1.2.1. MEASURES TO SMOOTH THE DELIVERY OF VISAS AND RESIDENCY PERMITS TO IVET LEARNERS FROM THIRD COUNTRIES

No significant initiative has been taken at country level. The UK Council for International Student Affairs (UKCISA) and the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) provide some information about visa requirements and how to apply for one, but assistance with visa and study permits mainly come from colleges and other education and training providers. The administration teams of colleges vary in size, depending on the size of the institution. Colleges that focus on attracting foreign students may have a dedicated team dealing with admission, visas and other issues related to international students. These teams are established and funded by the individual providers.

All the requirements for applying for visas to the UK are available from the UK Government’s visas and immigration website. Prospective students must meet certain criteria to be offered a visa, such as having been offered a place on a course of study, possess an adequate level of English language, and have sufficient finance to live and pay course fees.

2.1.2.2. MEASURES TO REDUCE ADMINISTRATIVE BURDENS THAT MAY HINDER THE INTERNATIONAL MOBILITY OF INCOMING OR OUTGOING IVET LEARNERS

The use of Erasmus+ mobility application forms and Europass documents have standardised the documentation processes of international mobility periods. User manuals and events organised by the Erasmus+ national agencies and the National Europass Centre are designed to assist the administrative work associated with organising international mobility periods.

2.1.2.3. MEASURES TO REMOVE THE LEGAL OBSTACLES TO THE INTERNATIONAL MOBILITY OF INCOMING OR OUTGOING MINOR IVET LEARNERS

Trial projects using ECVET memoranda of understanding in which it is clarified which organisation(s) have responsibility for issues such as travel, accommodation, and insurance for travel, health and work, have taken place. Clearly defined responsibilities along with the fact that accompanying staff take part in mobility periods abroad in accordance with Erasmus+ regulations, help organise mobility periods abroad for young people under the age of 18.

2.1.2.4. SOCIAL AND LABOUR PROTECTION OF APPRENTICES AND IVET STUDENTS INVOLVED IN INTERNATIONAL LEARNING MOBILITY

Social security
EU and European Economic Area (EEA) nationals qualify for free National Health Service (NHS) treatment. The UK has reciprocal health care agreements with certain other countries as well. Nationals from other countries must take out health insurance to cover medical care (2).

To be eligible for maternity leave payment, the mother must be a UK resident and have worked for 26 weeks and earn in excess of £112 per week (3).

Employees and apprentices aged over 22, and earning more than £10,000 per year in the UK will automatically be enrolled onto a pension scheme in which both the employer and employee contribute to the pension pot (4).

Labour protection
When employing a young person as an apprentice, UK employers have a responsibility to provide the same protection for their health, safety and welfare as for other employees. If an employer currently employs a young person, or has done so in the last few years, their existing risk management arrangements should be sufficient if a new young person is of a broadly similar level of maturity and understanding, and has no particular needs. If employing a young person for the first time, or employing one with particular needs, an employer will need to review their risk assessment, taking into account the specific factors for young people before they start their apprenticeship (5).

(2) (a) Who Pays? Determining responsibility for payments to providers, NHS England, 2013; (b) Health and Social Care Act 2012.
(3) https://www.gov.uk/maternity-pay-leave
(4) https://www.gov.uk/government/news/what-is-auto-enrolment
(5) See the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999, and the website of the Health and Safety Executive

2.1.3. COORDINATION AND EVALUATION
2.1.3.1. COORDINATION OF THE MEASURES TARGETED AT REMOVING THE ADMINISTRATIVE AND INSTITUTIONAL OBSTACLES
2.1.3.2. EVALUATION OF THE MEASURES TARGETED AT REMOVING THE ADMINISTRATIVE AND INSTITUTIONAL OBSTACLES
2.2. ANALYSIS OF COUNTRY SITUATION WITH RESPECT TO THE CRITERIA OF THE INDICATOR FOR THE “ADMINISTRATIVE AND INSTITUTIONAL ISSUES” THEMATIC AREA

UK IVET policy promotes the integration of international mobility experiences into the curricula of IVET programmes. However the country has not set target for international mobility in IVET. Also, no significant measures have been taken at country level to facilitate IVET learners’ international mobility whether through smoothing the delivery of visas and study permits to third country nationals, alleviate the administrative burdens induced by arranging mobility, or ease the movement of outgoing minor learners. In future, progress in this area could be made through setting countrywide targets for international mobility in IVET (e.g. promoting the EU 2020 IVET mobility benchmark of 6% learners having achieved at least a two-week learning period abroad). It could also be checked, e.g. through users/stakeholders survey, whether there are needs for support measures to assist incoming and outgoing IVET learners coping with the possible legal and administrative issues they might be faced with.

PART 3. RECOGNITION OF LEARNING OUTCOMES
3.1. DESCRIPTION OF COUNTRY STRUCTURES AND POLICY INTERVENTIONS
3.1.1. GENERAL APPROACH TO THE RECOGNITION OF LEARNING ACQUIRED ABROAD BY IVET LEARNERS
3.1.1.1. REGULATION BY LAW OR CASE BY CASE TREATMENT?

The decision to recognise learning completed abroad is taken by individual learning providers in the UK. No uniform national mechanism of recognition of learning has been agreed upon. The process of recognition of learning is influenced by independent awarding organisations who design qualifications, and rules of combination of learning and credit within national qualifications frameworks. The Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework (SCQF) allows for formative and summative recognition of learning, and a Recognition of Prior Learning Toolkit was developed by the SCQF Partnership to assist this process. The Qualifications and Credit Framework (QCF) rules are currently under review, and may result in more freedom for awarding organisations in creating qualifications, and less rigid regulations in terms of unitisation and credits. ECVET pilot projects have been experimented with transfer of learning and credits across borders.

3.1.1.2. EASE OF ACCESS TO RECOGNITION OF LEARNING ACQUIRED ABROAD BY IVET LEARNERS

Learning acquired abroad by IVET learners involved in international learning mobility may be recognised, but the process is felt by users as somewhat difficult. The processes of recognition are not automatic and standardised nationally within each of the four education jurisdictions nor, indeed, across the UK. The effectiveness and ease of recognition is therefore dependent on how well providers’ processes and the learning acquired are aligned with the requirements and regulations of awarding organisations and national qualifications frameworks in the UK.

3.1.2. POLICY TARGETS IN THEMATIC AREA OF RECOGNITION
3.1.3. SCOPE OF RECOGNITION

The recognition approach in place in the country applies to:
• Courses
• Credit points
• Units
• Modules
• Programmes
• Qualifications/diplomas/degrees

In principle, the systems of recognition allow for learning to be recognised for all the above components; however, in practice, actual recognition of IVET acquired abroad is not as common as envisaged when the systems of recognition were designed.

3.1.4. COUNTRYWIDE COORDINATION OF THE RECOGNITION APPROACH

No countrywide coordination exists currently. Four separate education systems exist in the UK (England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland), so different recognition methods, authorities, qualifications frameworks and regulations exist within the UK. Ecorys (the joint Erasmus+ national agency) coordinates a team of ECVET Experts (which includes members from the National Contact Points for each of the four countries of the UK, as well as independent VET experts). This Expert team promotes the use of ECVET nationally through workshops, events and direct support visits to VET stakeholders to explain how they can use ECVET. However, ECVET pilot projects have not resulted in a standard national, or UK-wide, and compulsory, mechanism of recognition. UK NARIC provides an informed opinion of the comparable levels of completed national qualifications from abroad to the UK systems of education, but final decisions regarding recognition of foreign credentials are taken at institutional discretion.

3.1.5. TIME LIMIT FOR THE RECOGNITION PROCESS

UK VET providers operate with a high level of autonomy, and the timeframe to decide on recognition of learning acquired abroad is set by the learning provider.

3.1.6. VISIBILITY OF CONTACT POINTS FOR INFORMATION ON RECOGNITION
3.1.6.1. ACTIONS TO ESTABLISH, OR MAKE MORE VISIBLE, CONTACT POINTS FOR INFORMATION ON RECOGNITION

There is no policy actions aimed to establish or make more visible contact points where IVET learners could obtain information on how learning outcomes and qualifications acquired abroad can be recognised and certified. Recognition of learning is coordinated through established channels within individual learning providers. As part of Erasmus+, the work plan envisions actions to make the ECVET Experts more visible, however the ECVET Experts team works with institutions, and not directly with learners.

3.1.6.2. EVALUATION OF THE VISIBILITY POLICY

There is no national visibility policy, so no evaluation thereof.

3.1.7. USE OF EU TOOLS FOR VISIBILITY, TRANSFER AND RECOGNITION OF LEARNING OUTCOMES

The National Europass Centre provides information about the Europass Mobility Document and how to use it. The Centre also maintains the online database where the mobility document is produced by registered sending and host organisations. The Europass Mobility Document describes and shows the skills gained during individuals’ placements abroad. It records the linguistic, practical, IT, personal, social, work-based and ‘soft’ skills that the participant has gained during a placement. Host organisations describe the skills and competences an individual has gained as a result of the experience, and record these in the Europass Mobility Document.

From October 2015 the Unique Learner Number (ULN) has been included as part of the Europass Mobility System. A section has been included in the European Mobility Registration System along with appropriate guidance for users to reflect this. The ULN is provided by the UK Learning Records Service (an agency of the Skills Funding Agency) and is initially sourced for the learner by the learning provider and then matched to the learner by subsequent learning providers. The ULN is used by Awarding Organisations to allocate qualification achievements.

The National Europass Centre provides information about the Certificate Supplement (CS), and assists UK awarding organisations wishing to use the Supplement to describe their qualifications. UK awarding organisations design and award qualifications, and work independently of the state. There is no requirement for awarding organisations to use the CS in the UK, but a handful of organisations do publish the CS on their websites. A UK CS template was developed by the National Europass Centre in the UK after consulting UK awarding organisations.

There is no legal requirement for UK VET providers and awarding organisations to use ECVET as a tool for recognition and visibility of periods of learning abroad. However, a team of ECVET experts coordinated by Ecorys and the British Council are available to present ECVET and assist organisations wishing to use the system. A number of organisations in the UK have trialled the use of ECVET elements through pilot projects. The aims of the ECVET activities in the UK are as follows: (a) To continue to raise awareness of ECVET to key stakeholders, culminating in a UK conference on ECVET to celebrate the work of Experts and highlight best practice by practitioners; (b) To promote and encourage organisations involved in mobility to use ECVET in geographical mobility, linking ECVET to Erasmus+; (c) To provide specific support to organisations in understanding ECVET within the UK context via a suite of guidance materials, events and ad hoc support visits; (d) To consolidate the work of ECVET in the UK and to encourage ECVET principles are embedded into organisations management systems for geographical mobility; (e) To develop an ECVET community of practice within the UK.

National qualifications frameworks in the UK are benchmarked to the EQF (7). The frameworks require qualifications to be unitised and credit-based. Education and training providers subsequently have the possibility to recognise learning outcomes and transfer credit from abroad.

Formal VET programmes in the UK are based on learning outcomes. ECVET projects in the UK have experimented with recognition of learning outcomes across borders.

(7) Qualifications can cross boundaries: http://www.rewardinglearning.org.uk/docs/regulation/guidance/cross_bound...

3.1.8. EVALUATION OF THE RECOGNITION POLICY, MECHANISMS AND PRACTICES
3.2. ANALYSIS OF COUNTRY SITUATION WITH RESPECT TO THE CRITERIA OF THE INDICATOR FOR THE “RECOGNITION OF LEARNING OUTCOMES” THEMATIC AREA

UK has mechanisms for recognition of learning outcomes acquired abroad by IVET learners. The UK approach makes use of all existing EU tools for visibility, transfer and recognition (i.e. the Europass Mobility Document and Certificate Supplement, ECVET, National qualification frameworks, and the Learning Outcomes approach). It takes into account the range of learning components considered in this review, i.e. courses, credit points, units, modules, programmes and qualifications / diplomas / degrees. However, the UK approach to recognition fails to meet several criteria of the reference indicator. It is not coordinated countrywide, and has no regulatory time frame for processing recognition requests. No policy has been put in place to make visible to users the contact points where they can get information on recognition. Finally the recognition process seems to be felt as difficult by users: learning completed as part of a period of study abroad may be more easily recognised at one education and training provider than another. Addressing these issues in future could be a good way to improve IVET international mobility in the UK.

PART 4. PARTNERSHIPS AND FUNDING
4.1. DESCRIPTION OF COUNTRY STRUCTURES AND POLICY INTERVENTIONS
4.1.1. POLICY TARGETS IN THE THEMATIC AREA OF PARTNERSHIPS AND FUNDING
4.1.2. COUNTRYWIDE COORDINATION OF POLICY ACTIONS
4.1.3. PARTNERSHIPS
4.1.3.1. ACTIONS TO SUPPORT COMPANIES AND IVET PROVIDERS IN THE CREATION OF MOBILITY PARTNERSHIPS AND NETWORKS

Information and assistance about possibilities for establishing partnerships for mobility is distributed as printed material, via websites, at events, seminars and webinars by Erasmus+ and ECVET agencies in the UK at events and through online and printed information material.

4.1.3.2. EVALUATION OF THE ACTIONS TO SUPPORT THE CREATION OF PARTNERSHIPS AND NETWORKS

Feedback is provided by national steering groups such as the UK European Coordination Group for VET Initiatives, which brings together the coordinators of initiatives and their government counterparts for exchanging information. The group’s role includes ensuring that, both from a user perspective as well as a policy perspective, the synergies between these initiatives is optimised and communicated.

4.1.4. FUNDING AND OTHER SUPPORT
4.1.4.1. SUPPORT TO LEARNERS
4.1.4.1.1. ACTIONS TO FUND THE INTERNATIONAL MOBILITY OF IVET LEARNERS

Financial support to IVET learners is provided within the framework of the Erasmus+ programme. Under the programme, organisations applying to send VET learners may receive a student grant to contribute to the costs that can be incurred on an international mobility placement. These costs include contributions to VET learners’ travel and subsistence as well as contributions to the organisations management costs. Funding is set at European level and is based on lump sums and unit costs and varies depending on the numbers of VET learners.

4.1.4.1.2. EVALUATION OF THE ACTIONS TO PROVIDE IVET LEARNERS WITH FINANCIAL SUPPORT

The Erasmus+ National Agencies (Ecorys and British Council) monitor and review activities performed as part of their work plan. They have a philosophy of continuous improvement and always look for ways in which to improve their service to their customers. Monitoring and impact measurement take place in the following ways: (a) Capture and analysis of data for online and digital activities; (b) Capture of feedback. A number of guidance documents and events are given to organisations to successfully manage a mobility project. The National Agencies reports on these activities on a quarterly basis to the UK government and yearly to the European Commission.

4.1.4.2. SUPPORT TO STAKEHOLDERS AND STAFF
4.1.4.2.1. ACTIONS TO PROVIDE COMPANIES, INSTITUTIONS AND STAFF WITH SUPPORT FOR ORGANISING MOBILITY PROJECTS

Eligible organisations are encouraged to apply for Erasmus+ funding for periods of learning and training abroad. In Scotland, organisations such as Scotland Goes Global also provide information, advice and guidance, as well as a study abroad module to be delivered in schools and colleges. The study abroad module is often delivered by a young person with experience of studying abroad, and aims to raise students’ understanding of why they should consider going global, either locally by opening up their minds to people in their community who might be from other cultures or online opportunities, or how they might go about trying to set themselves apart from the crowd by studying abroad as part of their future college or university choices.

4.1.4.2.2. EVALUATION OF THE SUPPORT TO ORGANISING MOBILITY PROJECTS

The Erasmus+ National Agencies (Ecorys and British Council) monitor and review activities performed as part of their work plan. They have a philosophy of continuous improvement and always look for ways in which to improve their service to their customers. Monitoring and impact measurement take place in the following ways: (a) Capture and analysis of data for online and digital activities; (b) Capture of feedback. Evaluation also takes place at organisational and institutional level in the four nations within the UK. The Erasmus+ National Agencies are required to report formally on a quarterly basis to UK government on UK performance on international IVET as well as activities that include programme promotion and guidance to applicants. The UK National Agencies are also required to report on a yearly basis to the European Commission on the performance of the programme that includes numbers of types of international IVET. This report is supported by an audit of the National Agencies from an independent auditing body.

4.2. ANALYSIS OF COUNTRY SITUATION WITH RESPECT TO THE CRITERIA OF THE INDICATOR FOR THE “PARTNERSHIPS AND FUNDING” THEMATIC AREA

UK has in place actions for funding IVET learners for their international mobility, and providing companies and IVET institutions with support for creating partnerships / networks, and arranging international mobility projects. These actions are evaluated, with exception however of the support to creating partnerships and networks, which is simply subject to peer’s feedback. It could be made sure in future that all policies in this area are specifically subjected to full-fledged evaluation, including recommendations implemented and translated into improvement of next generation of policies.

PART 5. MOTIVATION TO PARTICIPATE IN TRANSNATIONAL LEARNING MOBILITY ACTIVITIES
5.1. DESCRIPTION OF COUNTRY STRUCTURES AND POLICY INTERVENTIONS
5.1.1. ACTIONS FOR RAISING AWARENESS OF THE ADDED VALUE OF MOBILITY AND/OR FOSTERING A MOBILITY CULTURE
5.1.2. COUNTRYWIDE COORDINATION OF THE AWARENESS RAISING AND MOBILITY CULTURE ACTIONS
5.1.3. EVALUATION OF THE AWARENESS RAISING AND MOBILITY CULTURE ACTIONS
5.1.4. POLICY TARGETS IN THE THEMATIC AREA OF MOTIVATION
5.2. ANALYSIS OF COUNTRY SITUATION WITH RESPECT TO THE CRITERIA OF THE INDICATOR FOR THE “MOTIVATION” THEMATIC AREA
PART 6. PREPARATION OF OPPORTUNITIES FOR LEARNING MOBILITY
6.1. DESCRIPTION OF COUNTRY STRUCTURES AND POLICY INTERVENTIONS
6.1.1. MOBILITY PREPARATION FROM THE EARLY STAGES OF EDUCATION
6.1.2. COUNTRYWIDE COORDINATION OF THE PREPARATION ACTIONS
6.1.3. EVALUATION OF THE PREPARATION ACTIONS
6.1.4. POLICY TARGETS IN THE THEMATIC AREA OF PREPARATION
6.1.5. HOW ARE LEARNERS (AND STAKEHOLDERS) INVOLVED IN MAKING THE PREPARATION POLICY EFFECTIVE?
6.1.5.1. VISIBILITY AND ACCESS POLICY
6.1.5.1.1. Making the Preparation mechanisms visible and accessible: case of the linguistic and intercultural preparation mechanisms
6.1.5.1.2. Making the Preparation mechanisms visible and accessible: case of the digital preparation mechanisms
6.1.5.1.3. Making the Preparation mechanisms visible and accessible: case of the actions for the internationalisation of the IVET curriculum
6.1.5.2. LEARNERS (AND STAKEHOLDERS) SURVEYS
6.1.5.2.1. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the linguistic and intercultural preparation mechanisms
6.1.5.2.2. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the digital preparation
6.1.5.2.3. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the internationalisation actions
6.1.5.3. ASSESSMENT OF THE EXTENT OF USE
6.1.5.3.1. Assessment of the extent of use of the mechanisms for linguistic and intercultural preparation
6.1.5.3.2. Assessment of the extent of use of the digital preparation mechanisms
6.1.5.3.3. Assessment of the extent of use of the internationalisation actions
6.1.5.4. OTHER
6.2. ANALYSIS OF COUNTRY SITUATION WITH RESPECT TO THE CRITERIA OF THE INDICATOR FOR THE “PREPARATION” THEMATIC AREA
PART 7. QUALITY OF LEARNING MOBILITY
7.1. DESCRIPTION OF COUNTRY STRUCTURES AND POLICY INTERVENTIONS
7.1.1. ENSURING THE QUALITY OF MOBILITY EXPERIENCES
7.1.2. COUNTRYWIDE COORDINATION OF THE QUALITY-RELATED ACTIONS
7.1.3. EVALUATION OF THE QUALITY-RELATED ACTIONS
7.1.4. POLICY TARGETS IN THE THEMATIC AREA OF QUALITY
7.1.5. HOW ARE LEARNERS (AND STAKEHOLDERS) INVOLVED IN MAKING THE QUALITY POLICY EFFECTIVE?
7.1.5.1. VISIBILITY AND ACCESS POLICY
7.1.5.1.1. Making the Quality mechanisms visible and accessible: case of the linguistic and intercultural preparation mechanisms
7.1.5.1.2. Making the Quality mechanisms visible and accessible: case of the stay monitoring mechanisms
7.1.5.1.3. Making the Quality mechanisms visible and accessible: case of the feedback collection and reintegration mechanisms
7.1.5.1.4. Making the Quality mechanisms visible and accessible: case of the mechanisms for affordable and convenient housing, catering and transport
7.1.5.2. LEARNERS (AND STAKEHOLDERS) SURVEYS
7.1.5.2.1. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the linguistic and intercultural preparation mechanisms
7.1.5.2.2. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the stay monitoring mechanisms
7.1.5.2.3. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the feedback and reintegration mechanisms
7.1.5.2.4. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the mechanisms for affordable and convenient housing, catering and transport
7.1.5.3. ASSESSMENT OF THE EXTENT OF USE
7.1.5.3.1. Assessment of the extent of use of the mechanisms for linguistic and intercultural preparation
7.1.5.3.2. Assessment of the extent of use of the stay monitoring mechanisms
7.1.5.3.3. Assessment of the extent of use of the feedback and reintegration mechanisms
7.1.5.3.4. Assessment of the extent of use of the mechanisms for affordable and convenient housing, catering and transport
7.1.5.4. OTHER
7.2. ANALYSIS OF COUNTRY SITUATION WITH RESPECT TO THE CRITERIA OF THE INDICATOR FOR THE “QUALITY” THEMATIC AREA
PART 8. PORTABILITY OF GRANTS AND LOANS
8.1. DESCRIPTION OF COUNTRY STRUCTURES AND POLICY INTERVENTIONS
8.1.1. GRANTS AND LOANS AVAILABLE TO IVET LEARNERS FOR USE WITHIN THEIR COUNTRY
8.1.1.1. TYPES
8.1.1.2. PURPOSES
8.1.1.3. FUNDING BODIES
8.1.1.4. ACCESS CONDITIONS AND ALLOCATION PRINCIPLES
8.1.1.5. PORTABILITY
8.1.2. PORTABILITY POLICY
8.1.3. COUNTRYWIDE COORDINATION OF THE PORTABILITY MECHANISMS
8.1.4. EVALUATION OF THE PORTABILITY MECHANISMS
8.1.5. POLICY TARGETS IN THE THEMATIC AREA OF PORTABILITY
8.1.6. HOW ARE LEARNERS (AND STAKEHOLDERS) INVOLVED IN MAKING THE PORTABILITY POLICY EFFECTIVE?
8.1.6.1. Making the portability mechanisms visible and accessible
8.1.6.2. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the portability mechanisms
8.1.6.3. Assessment of the extent of use of the portability mechanisms
8.1.6.4. OTHER
8.2. ANALYSIS OF COUNTRY SITUATION WITH RESPECT TO THE CRITERIA OF THE INDICATOR FOR THE “PORTABILITY” THEMATIC AREA
PART 9. TAKING ON BOARD DISADVANTAGED LEARNERS
9.1. DESCRIPTION OF COUNTRY STRUCTURES AND POLICY INTERVENTIONS
9.1.1. PECULIAR ACTIONS TO PROVIDE DISADVANTAGED LEARNERS WITH SUPPORT TAILORED TO THEIR SPECIFIC NEEDS
9.1.2. COUNTRYWIDE COORDINATION OF THE SUPPORT MEASURES FOR DISADVANTAGED LEARNERS
9.1.3. EVALUATION OF THE SUPPORT MEASURES FOR DISADVANTAGED LEARNERS
9.1.4. POLICY TARGETS IN THE THEMATIC AREA OF SUPPORT TO DISADVANTAGED LEARNERS
9.1.5. HOW ARE LEARNERS (AND STAKEHOLDERS) INVOLVED IN MAKING EFFECTIVE THE SUPPORT POLICY FOR DISADVANTAGED LEARNERS?
9.1.5.1. VISIBILITY AND ACCESS POLICY
9.1.5.1.1. Making the mechanisms for disadvantaged learners visible and accessible: case of the actions in terms of Information and guidance
9.1.5.1.2. Making the mechanisms for disadvantaged learners visible and accessible: case of the funding actions
9.1.5.1.3. Making the mechanisms for disadvantaged learners visible and accessible: case of the actions in terms of motivation
9.1.5.1.4. Making the mechanisms for disadvantaged learners visible and accessible: case of the actions in terms of preparation
9.1.5.1.5. Making the mechanisms for disadvantaged learners visible and accessible: case of the actions in terms of using multipliers
9.1.5.2. LEARNERS (AND STAKEHOLDERS) SURVEYS
9.1.5.2.1. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the actions in terms of Information and guidance
9.1.5.2.2. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the funding actions
9.1.5.2.3. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the actions in terms of motivation
9.1.5.2.4. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the actions in terms of preparation
9.1.5.2.5. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the actions in terms of using multipliers
9.1.5.3. ASSESSMENT OF THE EXTENT OF USE
9.1.5.3.1. Assessment of the extent of use of the mechanisms for information and guidance
9.1.5.3.2. Assessment of the extent of use of the funding mechanisms
9.1.5.3.3. Assessment of the extent of use of the motivation-related mechanisms
9.1.5.3.4. Assessment of the extent of use of the preparation mechanisms
9.1.5.3.5. Assessment of the extent of use of the actions in terms of using multipliers
9.1.5.4. OTHER
9.2. ANALYSIS OF COUNTRY SITUATION WITH RESPECT TO THE CRITERIA OF THE INDICATOR FOR THE “SUPPORT TO DISADVANTAGED LEARNERS” THEMATIC AREA
PART 10. MAKING USE OF MULTIPLIERS
10.1. DESCRIPTION OF COUNTRY STRUCTURES AND POLICY INTERVENTIONS
10.1.1. ACTIONS IN TERMS OF ENCOURAGING THE USE OF MULTIPLIERS AND STAFF COMMITMENT TO LEARNING MOBILITY
10.1.2. COUNTRYWIDE COORDINATION OF THE MULTIPLIER POLICY
10.1.3. EVALUATION OF THE MULTIPLIER POLICY
10.1.4. POLICY TARGETS IN THE THEMATIC AREA OF USING MULTIPLIERS
10.1.5. HOW ARE LEARNERS (AND STAKEHOLDERS) INVOLVED IN MAKING EFFECTIVE THE MULTIPLIER POLICY?
10.1.5.1. VISIBILITY AND ACCESS POLICY
10.1.5.1.1. Making the Multiplier policy visible and accessible: case of the actions in terms of using multipliers
10.1.5.1.2. Making the Multiplier policy visible and accessible: case of the actions targeted at recognising and valuing staff commitment to learning mobility
10.1.5.1.3. Making the Multiplier policy visible and accessible: case of the actions in terms of mainstreaming mobility in the training of heads and staff of VET institutions
10.1.5.2. LEARNERS (AND STAKEHOLDERS) SURVEYS
10.1.5.2.1. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the actions in terms of using multipliers
10.1.5.2.2. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the actions in terms of recognising and valuing staff commitment to learning mobility
10.1.5.2.3. Learners (and stakeholders) surveys on the actions in terms of mainstreaming mobility in the training of heads and staff of VET institutions
10.1.5.3. ASSESSMENT OF THE EXTENT OF USE
10.1.5.3.1. Assessment of the extent of use of the mechanisms employing multipliers
10.1.5.3.2. Assessment of the extent of use of the mechanisms for recognising and valuing staff commitment to learning mobility
10.1.5.3.3. Assessment of the extent of use of the mechanisms for mainstreaming mobility in the training of heads and staff of VET institutions
10.1.5.4. OTHER
10.2. ANALYSIS OF COUNTRY SITUATION WITH RESPECT TO THE CRITERIA OF THE INDICATOR FOR THE “MULTIPLIERS” THEMATIC AREA
PART 11. SYNTHESIS - POLICY SUGGESTIONS

In the thematic area of Information and Guidance, UK has in place several mechanisms to provide IVET learners with information and guidance for their international learning mobility. This provision is coordinated countrywide. Several activities are carried out by the UK Erasmus+ National Agencies, Ecorys and British Council, to improve the provision. Evaluation of provision and improvement actions takes place through a range of channels (capture of users’ feedback, statistical monitoring, reporting).

Regarding the area of Administrative and Institutional Issues, UK IVET policy promotes the integration of international mobility experiences into the curricula of IVET programmes. However the country has not set target for international mobility in IVET. Also, no significant measures have been taken at country level to facilitate IVET learners’ international mobility whether through smoothing the delivery of visas and study permits to third country nationals, alleviate the administrative burdens induced by arranging mobility, or ease the movement of outgoing minor learners. In future, progress in this area could be made through setting countrywide targets for international mobility in IVET (e.g. promoting the EU 2020 IVET mobility benchmark of 6% learners having achieved at least a two-week learning period abroad). It could also be checked, e.g. through users/stakeholders survey, whether there are needs for support measures to assist incoming and outgoing IVET learners coping with the possible legal and administrative issues they might be faced with.

In the area of Recognition of Learning Outcomes, UK has mechanisms for the recognition of learning outcomes acquired abroad by IVET learners. The UK approach makes use of all existing EU tools for visibility, transfer and recognition (i.e. the Europass Mobility Document and Certificate Supplement, ECVET, National qualification frameworks, and the Learning Outcomes approach). It takes into account the range of learning components considered in this review, i.e. courses, credit points, units, modules, programmes and qualifications / diplomas / degrees. However, the UK approach to recognition is not coordinated countrywide, and has no regulatory time frame for processing recognition requests. No policy has been put in place to make visible to users the contact points where they can get information on recognition. Finally the recognition process seems to be felt as difficult by users. Addressing these issues in future could be a good way to improve IVET international mobility in the UK.

Finally, regarding Partnerships and funding, UK has in place actions for funding IVET learners for their international mobility, and providing companies and IVET institutions with support for creating partnerships / networks, and arranging international mobility projects. These actions are evaluated, with exception however of the support to creating partnerships and networks, which is simply subject to peer’s feedback. It could be made sure in future that all policies in this area are specifically subjected to full-fledged evaluation, including recommendations implemented and translated into improvement of next generation of policies.